Pitch count and recovery time for 7yr old


#1

My son pitched in a tournament last weekend and thought he was being over used. He pitched in 2 1/3 innings and threw 42 pitches on Saturday. On Sunday he pitched 2 innings and threw 31 pitches. I asked what the pitch limit was for their age and was told that there isn’t one, but can only pitch in 3 innings per day.
Also, he did complain about soreness in his back on his throwing side and wasn’t sure if it is just from playing or if there’s a mechanical issue with his pitching that may have caused his pain. I will attach the only video I have of him pitching from the tournament, once I figure out how to do that. Thanks and I look forward to hearing your feedback


#2

#3

Bashee

As you know, rest and recovery is probably the most important part of the pitching equation most coaches don’t get. The rest and recovery time it takes to recovery from a pitching outing is key. The arm especially the young arm needs time to recover from pitching before it is ready to pitch again. Youth pitchers are going through a growth period and may be at larger risk for injury. Ask yourself this, would a major league pitcher who threw 2 1/3 of an inning with 42 pitches in one day come in and pitch the next day? Probably not.

Until the rules of tournaments change these are some of the guidelines I used when coaching youth baseball:
1 inning pitched - 0 days rest if the inning was less than 20 pitches
2 inning pitched - minimum of 1 day rest. If he had a high pitch count inning, up to 25 pitches, add 1 day of rest.
3 inning pitched - minimum of 2 days rest. If pitch count went up to 25 pitches per inning, add one more day of rest
If a pitcher threw 25 pitches twice in an inning he was removed.
If a pitcher would ever exceed 30 pitches in one inning, the pitcher would be done for the day.

If you are looking for an answer to your question, no I would not have pitched your son on Sunday. Start to keep track of pitches per inning. Follow the formula above. Also look at the little league guide for how many pitches a pitcher should throw and what their suggestions for days rest is.

Hope this helps
Steve C


#4

Thanks for your advice Steve! How about warmup pitches? Should that be taken into account too?


#5

No I didn’t count warm up pitches as part of the pitch count


#6

You are the last word on pitch count with your son. It doesn’t matter what the league, team or tourney rules are, its your call. A good starting guideline is PitchSmart. You can adjust from there as your experience with your son and pitching expands.


#7

bashee,

“My son pitched in a tournament last weekend and thought he was being over used.”

Good thinking, what did you do about it right then?

All youth pitchers are used to much!

People in general do not know the dangers of ballistic Joint actions that get worse as biological age goes down.

By pitching your child at 7 chronological years old you have exposed him to lesser growth potential later that can not be gained back! he may be biologically aged 4.5 at this point in his male biological clock.

Even if he were an advanced maturer, his Elbow (the whole Epicondyle) will show up as translucent in an X-ray !!!

Warning! any pitch counts you hear as being recommended safe, especially the MLB endorsed Pitch Smart pitching rec’s are pseudoscience that are derived from surveys with non experts in child development, kinesiology or motor development. They were taken from College, pro and HS coaches, trainers and other baseball establishment professionals who guessed at the safe levels.

I’m told “at least it’s a start” when there is actual science on the subject and I don’t think acceptance of bogus info helps protect youth pitchers from arcane evolvement.

“He pitched in 2 1/3 innings and threw 42 pitches on Saturday.”

You did say he was 7?

“ On Sunday he pitched 2 innings and threw 31 pitches. “

Another big red flag and why Dr. Marshall said until Women are running little leagues these boys will never see a change in the way they are developed .

“men have proven incapable of protecting their boy’s”

“I asked what the pitch limit was for their age and was told that there isn’t one, but can only pitch in 3 innings per day.”

Only you can prevent ignorance!

“Also, he did complain about soreness in his back on his throwing side”

Pitching motions that employ bending of the back to recover (traditional) produce back joint pathomechanical effects. He is to young for that and is probably a fitness thing

You do not have to bend your back to recover and by staying tall allows you to use more degrees of rotation during ball drive. Your son stays tall and rotates like most kids his age. never change this.
He throws over the top so his primary mover is his latissimus Dorsi and it will be felt at his back in that area, this is a good indicator, never change this either.

“ if there’s a mechanical issue with his pitching that may have caused his pain.”

No if’s about it. Only a muscle can injure another muscle with a monoathletic movement and always thru mechanical applications. There is mitigation for all of them.

“Thanks and I look forward to hearing your feedback”

Dr. Mike Marshall who has produced the most non-injurious joint mechanics in overhead throwing even recommends no adrenaline assisted competitions until the first growth centers in the Elbow have started closing in equated biological maturers at 12 byo. And that’s only one time thru the line up once a week for only 3 competitive months consecutive a year.

It’s all about potential growth and even his mechanics can not avoid bone deformation.

With an equated maturer (chronological age matches his biological age) at chronologically aged 7 his cartilaginous Elbow will show X-ray translucense and show when it’s first hardening to white hard bone in 2 years at chronologically 9 as a dime sized dot at the tip of the Elbow, at 10 cyo/byo it turns into a nickle sized white spot, at 11 cyo/byo it turns quarter sized, at 12 it’s fittycent sized and it solidifies the whole Epicondyle except growth centers that have now entered their final growth period at 13. A very important time to not perturb!!! All growth centers in the Elbow close at 16 cyo/byo.

Now what if he is a delayed maturer? 1/3rd are on average.

The worst part is telling him his Elbow is a jumble of cartilaginous goo trying to organize it self and we will have to curtail your competitive oppertunities for a while ?


#8

#9

Bashee, this is good advice…almost my exact precription. I couldn’t agree more. And to Bashee’s father, no coach is going to be as good at protecting your son’s health in baseball than you. Especially for pitchers.

Follow those rules, and you won’t have to worry. Nice Job Explosivepicthing!