Penny ball(overrated and dangerous)


#1

alright my elbow has been killing me for a couple months, even when i throw fast balls or change ups. but i think it is because my friend convinced to throw a penny ball with him a couple times aweek. i was uncertain, but i caved in and did. sure my velocity increased greatly over a month or two, but i started notcing throbbing elbow problems after about 15 pitches(with out throwing any breaking pitches) and now i noticed and beleive that the penny ball threw my mechanics way off and my release point and delivery all togather and i dont last many picthes as i use to and was wondering if any of you could help me do sumthing to get my arm healthy again.
oh im slowly fixing my mechanics with out throwing a ball, though just baby steps. and i was wondering if a water logged baseball is better use than a penny ball(I think it would be).
well please give me some help on the arm care if you can.

      - Thanks

#2

what is penny ball


#3

it is just a a ball of pennies wrapped in duct tape, like a little smaller than a soft ball


#4

Think shotput.

Definately stop throwing the penny ball right now.

I’ve read no more than a 20% change in weight to prevent mechanical change, thus a 6oz baseball. You can pick one up online.

Definately do not use penny balls, they are far to heavy, and force you to recruit other muscles, thus the mechanical change, thus the pain from poor mechanics and added stress from an overly heavy ball.


#5

I hope the people who are interested in the whole overweight ball training thing read this.

First, stop throwing the penny ball.

I have made a few penny balls for use while dry throwing, and they end up at around a pound. That is roughly 3 times as heavy as a standard ball.

The problem with trying to throw at full speed with a heavy overweight ball is that it will eccentuate any mechanical problems and basically cause problems to occur 3 times times as quickly.

I do use 1lb, 3lb, and 6lb balls during training, but only at low speed and when performing certain exercises.

As you found out, trying to throw a heavy ball at full speed using your normal mechanics is a recipe for disaster.

Do you have a video of yourself throwing?


#6

Holy moly. That’s got to weigh 2, 3, or more lbs.


#7

I had never even heard of a penny ball before :?

And yeah, I’ll agree with what everyone else said. If the ball is too heavy and forces you to change your motion, it will do a lot of harm- wrecking your shoulder as well as your mechanics. I think weighted balls have great benefit but you have to find your threshhold for weight, and then go about the program with someone that knows how to instruct.


#8

I make my penny balls by cutting a 1 inch slit in a tennis ball, filling the ball with pennies, and then suturing the slit closed. The result is a ball that weighs a little less than a pound.

BUT I DON’T LET MY GUYS THROW IT AROUND.

I just let them dry throw with it (e.g. go through the motions of pitching at slow speed).

P.S. Sorry for the shouting, but I wanted to make sure I get that last point across.


#9

thats alright ill take any constructive cristicism, i never thought of a tennis ball sounds a quite bit safe than the one i have. but i think im going to wait a few months before any more weighted balls. thanks


#10

Rule of thumb for weighted ball training: Never use a ball over 6 oz., an ounce heavier than a regular ball, and never use a ball less than 4 oz., an ounce lighter. That’s all you really need to effectively extract the benefits of weighted ball training, assuming you do it correctly.