P90x for Baseball?


#21

Kyleb, I’ve seen alot of your posts and whether you mean to or not, you come off very negative, condescending and defensive. Maybe that’s your writing style, I don’t know. I think you’re probably a guy who spends alot of time on this stuff and have alot to offer but frankly I’m not attracted to your posts by their tone.

Try striking a more positive and callaborative tone and I think you’ll find yourself in less of these types of back and forth.

My only experience with the p90x is with a 13-year old that I’ve been working with for 2 years. He completed it this winter and he’s stronger and more explosive. He throws harder and maintains his posture much better. I’m not saying this happened and so this happened, I’m just saying he did it and he got better.


#22

I’m simply going to repeat these rules, since I’m no longer interested in having the same argument over and over again:

  1. Everything works.
  2. Some things work better than others.
  3. Nothing works forever.

#23

KyleB, I’m interested in that positive sulcus sign data.

Are self-administered tests possible? All I could come up with on Google required another person.


#24

[quote="|J3|"]KyleB, I’m interested in that positive sulcus sign data.

Are self-administered tests possible? All I could come up with on Google required another person.[/quote]

I’m sure that it can be done using a mirror and some creative thinking, but I haven’t seen a how-to for it.


#25

After 4 years of College baseball, I first found out about the TuffCuff booklet in 2007 and completed the yearly cycle while also incorporating my college’s mandatory team workouts. I loved it but personally it didn’t help me throw any harder. I could do heavy squats and explosive exercises and I would still top out at 87-89 like I did in high school (as a LHP). I’ve completed 3 sessions of P90X going from the Basic to Doubles, to the Lean section. I believe that a pitcher would mostly benefit from the Lean section. The first three weeks are this:

  1. Core Synergistics aka full body explosive movements involved
  2. Cardio X - light workout but good on bullpen days
  3. Shoulders and Arms, Ab Ripper X - Good after a heavy throw day
  4. Yoga X- Helps with Overall flexibility and increases balance
  5. Legs and Back, Ab Ripper X- Good for lower body explosive movements
  6. Kenpo X- Average workout that helps with flexibility, cardio, and balance
  7. Rest Day or X Stretch- more flexibility.

Also the P90x program is meant to be flexible to people schedules so if someone is feeling like they need to do other things that day then they should do it such as Squats, Medicine Ball workouts, or just a good run.
-Personally I would do the Plyometrics CD more often than the Cardio X to work on explosive movements and work on cardio at the baseball field.

Anyways I still can throw 87-89 even after P90X with no irritation in my shoulders or elbow and I find that I feel better/stronger doing the pushups in the program than doing DB bench presses or straight bar.
I believe that P90x is a better weight/conditioning program than most colleges NAIA-NCAA D1 schools are using. (Not including top schools with lots of $$ in their baseball programs)


#26

[quote=“Joker18”]
I believe that P90x is a better weight/conditioning program than most colleges NAIA-NCAA D1 schools are using. (Not including top schools with lots of $$ in their baseball programs)[/quote]

On this we absolutely agree. Except for the top schools with lots of $$… because I would include them too!