Overthrowing


#1

Ive heard a few coaches touch on overthrowing, saying that overthrowing causes the fastball to flatten out and actual lose velocity which would take away any relevance to overthrow and gain velocity. Then I here coaches talk about letting it rip or letting it loose, whats the difference between overthrowing and these phrases.


#2

Overthrowing can cause rushing, which can cause you to leave the ball up in the strike zone. A guy who’s overthowing actually needs to back off a little bit.

Letting it rip is a fix for someone who’s trying to aim the ball and is shortening up their arm swing as a result.


#3

Overthrowing is throwing at a speed where you lose command. In most cases trying to throw harder will have little or no effect on movement unless one is a sinkerball pitcher relying on downward movement. A lot of HS pitchers tend to work 1 or 2 mph below their maximum speed and can only be wild in the strike zone at best. More experienced pitchers, especially starters, tend to work about 4 mph below their maximum velocity so as to be able to locate their pitches and also have a little extra left when they need it.

On the other hand pitchers need to learn how to throw hard, because that is what builds arm strength and improves velocity. Ideally, a pitcher learns to throw hard, builds up their maximum velocity and then throws most of their game fastballs a few mph less than their maximum velocity. Some pitchers will lose velocity when trying to throw hard because they tighten up their muscles. That’s one reason why radar guns can be an effective tool during a bullpen. They can let a pitcher know the difference between throwing hard and throwing fast.


#4

good advice both of you…if only I could afford a radar gun lol


#5

[quote=“CADad”]Overthrowing is throwing at a speed where you lose command. In most cases trying to throw harder will have little or no effect on movement unless one is a sinkerball pitcher relying on downward movement. A lot of HS pitchers tend to work 1 or 2 mph below their maximum speed and can only be wild in the strike zone at best. More experienced pitchers, especially starters, tend to work about 4 mph below their maximum velocity so as to be able to locate their pitches and also have a little extra left when they need it.

On the other hand pitchers need to learn how to throw hard, because that is what builds arm strength and improves velocity. Ideally, a pitcher learns to throw hard, builds up their maximum velocity and then throws most of their game fastballs a few mph less than their maximum velocity. Some pitchers will lose velocity when trying to throw hard because they tighten up their muscles. That’s one reason why radar guns can be an effective tool during a bullpen. They can let a pitcher know the difference between throwing hard and throwing fast.[/quote]

Well put, CADad!!


#6

When a h.s. kid looks behind the backstop and sees all the guns does he try throwing harder or faster and assuming he uses the same grip and pressure how does he mechanically.slow down a few mph and what does he do to add a few mph?


#7

Most HS pitchers will try to throw harder for the scouts unless they are used to them.

There really isn’t anything mechanical to do to try to throw harder or slower although some pitchers find that speeding up the tempo can help them throw a bit faster as long as they can maintain their timing while doing so. That’s something that has to be practiced as most pitchers will simply end up rushing when they first try to increase their tempo.


#8

CADad…hoping you would define the meaning of the words throwing harder or faster then you use tempo. When amateur pitchers hear “don’t overthrow” they either do nothing different or throw slower. If they were throwing too hard or fast originally and/or there was a location problem could a better choice of words get the point across better?


#9

Probably. I may not know what the best words to use are. I really only work with my son and haven’t been able to do that for a while. We have him work on location, work on throwing at the speed that he can get the ball somewhere in the strike zone at, and work on throwing as hard as he can. That gives him the opportunity to learn how to do each of those things and to understand his limits. We were using a radar gun at times to give him feedback so he new if he was throwing faster or just trying to throw faster and of course hitting or not hitting his target provided the feedback on his ability to locate.


#10

CADad. If you have access to a net {8x8}you can stand behind, while holding a bat and assuming various l/r stances he will get used to the image of a live batter and you can provide feedback as to the speed variances without worrying about getting hit. You may place home plate on his side of the net, you the batter then can move back and swing or take his pitches. Likewise you may sit on a bucket with a catchers glove, behind the net and he can hit the targets as you then concentrate on his motion, speed etc. without even catching the ball.


#11

Being that I like to focus on the result and kinda work backward from there, I like to tell my guys to go as hard as you can while still finishing with perfect balance …