Ouch, $100 for a pitching book is pricey!


#1

Dick Mills announced yesterday that the price of his new book, “The Art and Science of Pitching,” is about $100. Pricey, no doubt.

Despite the hefty tag – and subsequent need to probably get a “second job” to snatch it – are you still going to check it out?


#2

no!!!


#3

I have one of Mills previous books…not bad…but I must say I find your ebook to be even better

I’ve bought that and really enjoy this forum

Thanks a bunch

My son is 13 going on 14 soon, and I continue to try to learn as much as I can to try to help him be the best he can be

:stuck_out_tongue:


#4

There is a way better book i know about for only 25 dollars. I think its called The Ultimate book of Advanced pitching Philsosphies (SP?) by Steve Ellis.

In all seriousness, I really did like your book. I have a read a ton of baseball books and the best are the Pitchers Bible by Nolan Ryan, the one by Leo Mazzone (forget the title) and your book. I like how it has an upbeat feel to it. It really simplifys everything. Some baseball authors are into all of the “State-of-the-art” equipment that costs a ton. Others, such as Dick Mills’ has even gone as far to say that all of these thing can hurt you. I like how the 3 books that I mentioned are in the middle. Everything that you write seems to make sense, if you think about it.


#5

[quote=“Hoovedawg”]Has anyone read the book by Mike Marshall?[/quote]Oh boy!! Let’s not go there again!! :wink:


#6

please dont go there.
coach ellis’ webbook is great. real life instruction - no guru speak.
mazzone’s book is great.
2 of the most useful pitching books ive ever read by coaches in the trenches actually doing the job is “the total pitching program” by university of memphis coach daron schoenrock and a “balanced approached to pitching” by former ut pitching coach fred corral. corral also has a couple of good videos.
you can buy corrals, schoenrock, mazzone, ellis’ books and still not spend anywhere near $100 and get a whole lot more useful info than you can by getting ripped off by one of the “gurus”.


#7

[quote=“raiderbb”]…get a whole lot more useful info than you can by getting ripped off by one of the “gurus”.[/quote]So, you’re assuming this is a rip-off. Regardless of what you obvisously think of Mills, do you realize who his co-author is? Brent Rushall is quite a respected person in the sports physiology, motor learning research and bio-mechanics fields. I want to hear what he has to say. If Mills were writing all of this by himself, I’d say no to buying it but Rushall has written some very good things and I’m expecting more of the same from him. Paul Nyman often includes on his web sites articles on learning research, physiology, bio-mechanics, etc. from noted researchers. He included one a while back on reverse progression, backward chaining or whatever you want to call it. I found it fascinating and only recently realized it was by the same Brent Rushall who is Mills’ co-author. That lends some credibility.

I grow so very tired of people stating that “…it has been scientifically proven that …” but they don’t have anything to back it up. Hopefully, Rushall will have that backup. I’m investing but I hope he isn’t just on a crusade regarding a philosophy he has as opposed to showing “real” science. He promises the science. We’ll see.


#8

I didnt know that Dr. Marshall’s book had been discussed on this board already. Sorry


#9

The moderator and at least one other contributor to this site are fans of his teachings. It has inspired some very interesting posts.


#10

I would like to, but I won’t afford it.

I was looking for a Pitching book. I searched Amazon.com and I was just about to buy one of Tom House’s pitching book (The Pitching Edge).

But then I found Steven Ellis’ ebook and opted to buy it instead of buying Tom House’s book.

It amazed me how good the book is, and how inexpensive it was. I loved it because it is a new book with no outdated informations.

Mills’ book should be a great book but for a $100 price tag I don’t think the “average” people will afford it.


#11

no book should cost that must unless its the original note book john lennon wrote all the beatles classics in lol

everyone would be better off to spend that towards some pitching lessons with a qualified hands on instructor


#12

[quote=“raiderbb”]
2 of the most useful pitching books ive ever read by coaches in the trenches actually doing the job is “the total pitching program” by university of memphis coach daron schoenrock and a “balanced approached to pitching” by former ut pitching coach fred corral.[/quote]

Where can I get a couple of copies of each?

Another great book, if, of course, you can find it, is Bob Shaw’s “Pitching,” which was published some time ago. (It was actually Chris O’Leary who recommened it a while back. Thanks, Chris.)

Anyone read Bagnozi’s “The Act of Pitching”? It tops many people’s Top 5 lists.


#13

dm by no means do i think dick mills doesnt have useful info. ive stated many times ive got alot a useful stuff from mills. but i can get the same stuff a whole lot cheaper.
coach ellis’ i just called both of those guys at their office and asked for some info. its their whole pitching program. weights, throwing programs, conditioning, inseason routines, mechanics, bullpens, strategies, etc. etc. they charged me $10, the cost of the printing and mailing. id recommend them to anyone. coach corral left ut for another job at a major program. i’ll have to recheck where it was but it was another top d1 program. i know the new pitching coach at ut is following the same program. he sent me stuff too and it was basically the same.
i just got another book- just glanced at it but seems pretty good. “coaching pitchers” spanky mcfarland.
ive got 2 tom house books. " the pitching edge" and “fit to pitch” got a little from it but alot of these people really over complicate the process. im not into science speak.
leo mazzones book is also very useful and practical. keeps it simple.
the webbook by coach ellis is great.


#14

just for refference the Shoenrock book, is explained by himself here:
http://www.mycoachonline.com/store/detail.lasso?U01=PR0703HF

just googled around and thought i’d share, it looks good to me, basically like raiderbb said, it’s his coaching on paper (originally for his players to study). I might have to pick this one up myself.


#15

[quote=“Steven Ellis”]Anyone read Bagnozi’s “The Act of Pitching”? It tops many people’s Top 5 lists.[/quote]I have it. Great for grips and how to throw various pitches but, in my opinion, not great for mechanics.


#16

Mazzone’s “Pitch Like a Pro” is another one that surprised me with how poor it was for mechanics. I got very, very little out of that book.


#17

mazzone is about the bottom line - getting the job done. im not into scientific speak. thought it was a great info.


#18

Thanks for the link. Got Schoenrock’s book and, along these lines, e-mailed him to join the forum. We’ll see. If you’ve got additional baseball people you’d like me to contact, please post here or PM me. I’m more than happy to do that. Thanks again for the link.

BTW, I agree that the Mazzone book, “Pitch Like a Pro,” is generally not what I hoped, I did, however, gleen some useful info. (p. 58, balls to strikes; p. 56, “it all comes down to location, not pitch selection”; p. 47 individuality and pitching mechanics; and p. 5, developing “feel and touch.”) I’ll “blog” about this stuff in the coming weeks.


#19

fyi - fred corral is now at the university of oklahoma. like i said i just called him and he sent me his book.
i also looked up his video series - found it available at the webball site.


#20

[quote=“raiderbb”]mazzone is about the bottom line - getting the job done. im not into scientific speak. thought it was a great info.[/quote]I’m not into “scientific speak” either. I prefer relevant information. Anyone can sound smart by spouting lots of technical terms. Give me the real deal and back it up with research, videos, peer confirmation, etc.

Raiderbb, what did you find was “great info”. All I got out of his book was the discussion about tempo and his talk about pitch location. He had little need to deal with mechanics. He had guys like Maddux. He had other things to deal with, like starting rotations. I just found that the book was not very useful for a coach strugging to get a kid to improve his mechanics.