One reason why pitchers throw harder than others

Some pitchers throw harder then others because they have better mechanics or stronger legs.

yeah mechanics is definetly is one factor. Another is natural arm strength. Either your born with it or your not. not to say that you cant build up arm strength it just makes it a lot easier to throw harder if your born with it. An example would be Nolan Ryan.

Polar Bears Sp-
Actually, most pitching coaches and people who have studied pitching,
agree that most of a pitcher’s power comes the legs, hips, etc. (lower body)
Like Tim Lincecum has said,
“My arm is just along for the ride”.
The arm should not be the sole source of a pitcher’s velocity.
As for Nolan Ryan, have you ever watched a clip of him pitching in slow motion?
As you should notice, his hips rotate, then his shoulders (delayed shoulder rotation).
Nolan Ryan threw with his body, not his arm.

Polar Bears Sp-
Actually, most pitching coaches and people who have studied pitching,
agree that most of a pitcher’s power comes the legs, hips, etc. (lower body)
Like Tim Lincecum has said,
“My arm is just along for the ride”.
The arm should not be the sole source of a pitcher’s velocity.
As for Nolan Ryan, have you ever watched a clip of him pitching in slow motion?
As you should notice, his hips rotate, then his shoulders (delayed shoulder rotation).
Nolan Ryan threw with his body, not his arm.[/quote]

That assumption is way too simple. If you threw with your body there would be no need for scapular loading however all pitchers do to varying degrees. Try this record yourself and try to just throw using your legs and core, likely your arm will basically just be along the way for the ride and provide none of the scapular loading which is necessary for high velocities.

Now this in no way means that all pitchers throw simply with their arms, but their body supports and feeds power into their arms through the kinetic chain. It a whip which ultimately culminates in the delivery of the ball.

There is no question that much of pitching velocity is determined innately. For, were it simply a matter of mechanics, or training, or drills, or nutrition, all pitchers would throw 101 mph. But few do, because most can’t, because they lack the innate ability to do so.

The whole body must be coordinated in order to pitch.
Every section or segment of the body has its own importance in pitching.

To CardsWin and priceless: BRAVO! You guys are right on target. The secret of a pitcher’s power, regardless of whetner s/he is a fireballer or a snake-jazzer, is getting the whole body into the action, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and seamless) motion, to generate the power behind the pitches. The arm and shoulder do indeed go along for the ride, and so the pitcher can throw harder with less effort—how not to get a sore arm or a sore shoulder or a sore anything else! In fact, I call it ‘THE SECRET", and I learned it a long time ago from watching the Yankees’ Big Three rotation, seeing just how they did it, and making a note of it and working on it on my own. :slight_smile:

There is no question that much of pitching velocity is determined innately. For, were it simply a matter of mechanics, or training, or drills, or nutrition, all pitchers would throw 101 mph. But few do, because most can’t, because they lack the innate ability to do so.

Charlie Hough was once asked why more pitchers don’t throw the knuckleball. “Why don’t more pitchers throw 95 mph?” Hough shot back.
“Because it’s really hard to do!”
:!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :!:

I actually think it’s b/c pitchers train to throw hard from the mound. I played with LOTS of guys (outfielders, shortstops) who threw 90+ mph from the field. But from the mound, they were low 80s. Pitchers throw hard because they train to throw hard from the mound…

Fast twitch motor units and the nervous system to use them.

To be able to throw 90s off a mound, a pitcher (or player) must have the correct mechanics.
Also, throwing from a mound is quite different than throwing on a level field surface. When throwing on a level field surface, the stride is shortened and sometimes (depending on the length of the throw) the release point is different.