One more try


#1

This is what I’m doing naturally. I’ve never been taught and would like any instruction on what looks correct and incorrect, suggestions?

I just wanna add one other thing in case there’s anyone else out there like myself. One of my biggest inspirations is Scott Eyre. I didn’t know I had ADHD until I was a senior in high school so it basically ruined any chance I had of playing baseball. Here I am now working full time, going to school part time and working out 5 days a week. I cant let go of wanting one shot at trying out. Thats why I’d really appreciate any information out there. Thanks for all read this and I look forward to hearing from you…


#2

Your front side is opening up to early. You’re rotating your front arm to the right before you land. This is why you fall off to the right after release. I suggest that you work on your front side by practicing throwing when youre in the landing position. Keep your glove out in front of you when throwing and bring your chest to the glove and not rotate it.

I’d also have you bring your arms closer to your body when you’re lifting your leg. This will help you stay compact and limit the extra movement in your delivery.


#3

what huskie said is true

also you must become more explosive while being flexible… look up on google and youtube some workouts to help


#4

I totally agree, that is a perfect thing to work on first, you can see this all the way down to your foot that after it plants ends up nearly facing straight toward the 3rd base dugout. I think after some work on this then try and post a new video for more suggestions.


#5

First off, thanks all you guys for taking the time out of your day and I really appreciate it! Practice makes perfect and I havent ran for over a year lol, as you can tell where that quickness is lacking. Gonna work on this stuff in the gym just throwing and running/lifting legs while losing hopefully 30 some pounds and give you another video once this snow melts, thanks again!


#6

Agree with the above comments. Focus on stabilizing the glove out in front of your torso. Doesn’t have to be dead center - just don’t let it get outside your body. You can turn it over as the shoulders rotate but firm it up - squeezing the glove can sometimes help.


#7

You’ll be throwing 90 in no time.


#8

I know you’re huge on stabilizing the glove out front, and I have used your sound advice with my 9 year old lefty son. But I don’t recall seeing you recommend squeezing the glove. Can you elaborate? Is this a common technique? And how does it work? Is this something you would try with a 9 to 12 year old? Thanks.


#9

When you squeeze your glove it helps create tension, instead of being lose, the tension over exaggerates the stabilization of the glove allowing you to lock in the basic fundamentals. Technically you always want to be applying tension in majority of physical activity because it actives all the muscles through out the body , maximizing efficiency of the movement.


#10

You seem like you know your stuff huskie… I’m reading on your power fit pitching and learning some new stuff, thats awesome. Keep it going, I’ll be reading it all the time.


#11

south paw,

Like huskie said, squeezing the glove can help activate the muscles in the glove hand/arm to create tension and stabilize the glove. But you’re right that I don’t normally recommend it - especially with younger pitchers. The reason is I really want pitchers to generally be relaxed and loose. Too much tension in the the body and at the wrong time will have a negative effect. This is, for example, why pitchers who try to muscle up on the ball when throwing for the gun actually throw slower. You can’t create as much “whip” when you’re tensed up.


#12

Thanks Roger. I’ll keep this in mind as my son matures.


#13

I realize I put these on my blog on here but I need all the help I can get. I’m not a mound yet, not sure if its going to make it harder to analyze but any advice is better than no advice. I’ll keep updating this thread as I get better and actually LEARN how to maximize my size. Thanks in advance.


#14

You still open up too early, as in the first video. By doing so, you put excess stress on your shoulder. Not to mention the fact that you also are losing velocity by doing this. Focus on driving to the plate and pointing your toe right at the catcher.


#15

When I land on my right foot, I kind of feel as if I’m landing on the outside of the foot instead of the center of the foot. I’m thinking if I’m doing this thats what is causing me to really shift to the outside. I’ll try my best tommorow to really stay tight and level when I land. Baby steps thats all I can do for now. Thanks for the help though man.


#16

[quote=“JustinRenard”]When I land on my right foot, I kind of feel as if I’m landing on the outside of the foot instead of the center of the foot. I’m thinking if I’m doing this thats what is causing me to really shift to the outside. I’ll try my best tommorow to really stay tight and level when I land. Baby steps thats all I can do for now. Thanks for the help though man.[/quote]When you start to make these changes, work from the stretch. It becomes easier to fix faults this way since it is so simplistic. My suggestion is the you lean forward a little bit more. Since you are landing on the outside, it can be a balance issue. My question is, how long is your stride? If you overstride, you currently may not have the flexibility or strength to maintain proper form, but that will come in time.

Also, saw in your log that you still struggle with cardio and endurance. This will help you lose the most amount of weight, so I suggest doing cardio and endurance quite often during the week, but don’t let your workouts go too long. If you are on a crunch for time, run in the morning and lift at night or vice versa. One your body goes past a certain point in a workout, you stop receiving it’s positive benefits.