Off-season Core Work


#1

hey im a freshman. im just wondering if by any chance i can get a link to a weekly off-season core program or exact list of what workouts i should be performing to have a better pitching core…

thanks…


#2

I have a bunch of exercises. PM if you want them!


#3

Dear David:

Good to hear your getting ready for the 2006-2007 season. The core, as you know, is one of the key factors helping to produce effective velocity and mechanics during the delivery. Surprisingly, the spine and lower back is just as important for training purposes. This year, our pitching staff has incorporated yoga stretching and motions into our abdominal workout. The prone series, plank/dog pose, and swiss ball work have really helped our players improve their strength in the core region. All of the exercises are super easy and will help the development of strength in the abdominals, gluets, and lower back. That way, not only will you be throwing harder, but you will be HEALTHY as well.

Good Luck…


#4

Dear David:

Check out the following link:

www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/corestabex.htm

This website displays great yoga stretches that you can perform to strengthen your core muscles.

Good Luck…


#5

CoachKreber I am glad you posted some yoga stuff, because I was just going to post a question about this. What do you think about incorporating yoga/pilates into your daily workout routine, is it good for pitchers or not?


#6

hey corazon can you sedn me a pm of those excersises you have? thanks


#7

Gentlemen:

I really think this type of training is the way of the future in sports. Many colleges are turning to these static strength drills to improve functional strength and fitness. In 2005, there was an excellent Sport’s Illustrated article outlining the Washington Redskins OL yoga and core workouts. These workouts were based on yoga and pillates exercises.

I think the trick is changing people’s perceptions on why these exercises work for athletes, not just middle aged women. First, they force players to achieve balance throughout the exercise. Secondly, these exercises develop one of the body’s largest muscle: glutes. These muscles are extremely important in sports. Thirdly, for younger athletes, these exercises strengthen the lower back, which is an area that players have started to injury quite frequently. Finally, these exercises force players to achieve mental toughness, extreme focus, and slow breathing. As you know, both are very useful in athletic competition.

I am not saying that it has to be the major strength component of your program, but try it out with your players. I promise they will be dying from these workouts. I have seen them first hand.

I think if you look at Japanese baseball you will find pitchers that work at this on a daily basis. Check their injury totals. I do not have the statistics in front of me, but I can almost promise their pitchers do not experience the “body breakdowns” US pitchers seem to run into every year.


#8

My son has just begun using the swissball or postureball for flexibility and core strength. These exercises were brought to my attention by my chiropractor who has a background in college baseball. I’ve been impressed with the results. I agree with CoachKreber about the benefits. My son had some challenges with growth spurts and these seem to help his overall flexibility and balance especially the spine and back muscles.

Check out www.bodyzone.com