# of different pitches

Hi i just wanted to know how many different pitches a high school player should know because i now know how to throw all the pitches on Mr.Ellis’ page but i want to know which ones or how many pitches i should know. I am a righty pitcher. I know how to throw these:
-4 seam fast ball - best pitch so far
-sinker - not sure of how the movement goes
-curveball- about teh same speed as a my fastball - it tends to only curve
-curveball- i take alot of the pitch about 5-10mph less than my fastball-it drops
-curveball-sidearmed-does the opposite of a regular curve.instead of droping it rises
-knucklecurve- it tends to be alot slower than my regular curveball but i havent thrown this that much
-3 fingerchange up- i just release it like a fastball but with about a 45 degree angle from my head but with the same speed
fosh changeup-i just release it like a fastball but with about a 45 degree angle from my head but with the same speed
circle change- i just release it like a fastball but with about a 45 degree angle from my head but with the same speed
-slider- cannot throw
** please tell me how many pitches i should learn and which ones also**
please do correct me if i am doing anything wrong thanks

“curveball- about teh same speed as a my fastball - it tends to only curve”

First, the above pitch sounds like a slider to me. Similar speed to fastball but with some break. This could also be a sinker (aka 2-seam fastball).

Second, a change-up isn’t a change-up unless it comes in 10% slower than your fastball but looks exactly the same.

Third, I would focus on throwing all of your pitches from the same arm slot. That will make it harder for batters to know what’s coming.

In general, I would focus on throwing fewer pitches better. For now, a good basic set is Fastball, Change-Up, and Curveball.

well said-“fewer pitches better”. This was a major problem I had when I worked with high school pitchers. Guys always trying to work on “another” pitch and trying to come up with as many pitches as possible.
Spot the fastball, get more movement on the sinker, try to make your change as effective as possible, and a good breaker. This is a simple plan for a starting high school pitcher. Make these three pitches as effective as possible. Ask any college coach what he wants in a pitcher and most will tell you command of a third pitch. Not a fourth or fifth.
We would have relievers try to command two pitches, generally a sinker and either a change or breaker. When young pitchers focus on two or three pitches, you end up with two really effective pitches instead of five or six average pitches.

concentrate on fastball, change and a quality breaking pitch.
you might can throw all those other pitches but you’ll master none - plus have arm problems.

after a while people see enough curves to know how to hit them. Focus especially on a change up and moving fastball. Breaking pitches can be effective but very few high school pitchers throw a good change up with movement. The ones who do get their teams deep into the playoffs… like we did last year.

Focus on 4-seam fastball, 2-seam fastball, Change, and Curve.

I noticed some people did not add the 2-seamer in what you should be focusing on but you really should add that one too.

[quote=“Redsox04”]Focus on 4-seam fastball, 2-seam fastball, Change, and Curve.

I noticed some people did not add the 2-seamer in what you should be focusing on but you really should add that one too.[/quote]

Hi I have a 4 seam, a 12-6 curve and a Changeup/Circle Change. Should I try to learn the 2-seam as well? I’m still developing my Curveball and my Circle Change. I have good control on my 4-seam fastball, but should I also learn a 4th pitch before mastering my Change and my Curveball?

Thanks.

Yes the 2-seamer should be the pitch that will cut to the outside of the plate for you, so its a great pitch to have.

ok…u dont need that many pitches

I don’t see three pitches as being too many. Don’t look at the two-seamer(or sinker) as “another” pitch, it’s still a fastball with more movement and (generally) less velocity. It can be difficult to pitch with only a four-seam fastball unless the velocity and location is very good. The two-seamer adds arm side run with sink to the fastball and makes it much more difficult to hit as opposed to a straight fastball.

Many pitchers like to throw the two-seam to the arm side of the plate and the four seam to the glove side of the plate. Throwing the two seam to the glove side of the plate can be difficult until control of it is mastered.

Babe Ruth—there will never be another like him—once said that a good changeup will cause batters more grief than anything else. So it’s essential that a pitcher have at least one good changeup in his arsenal. I will add to that something my old pitching coach, an active major-league pitcher, once told me—that just about any pitch I threw can be turned into a nice changeup, and he demonstrated a few such. This was particularly useful for me because I was a “snake-jazz” pitcher, not much on speed but with a good repertoire of breaking stuff. Because I didn’t have a fast ball to speak of, I had to acquire this collection of breaking pitches! My best pitch, by the way, was “Filthy McNasty”—a very good slider which I named for a character in a W.C. Fields movie because that was exactly what it was, and I worked off that and used it as my strikeout pitch.
Of course, however few or many pitches you have in your repertoire, it’s so important to have command of all of them. :slight_smile: 8)