Observation

[size=7]Bare with me if this topic has recently been discussed but this is something that recently i have been giving a lot of thought. currently my schools fall season is coming to a close and the popular time to hit the weight room is at hand. a major opinion of the majority of the pitchers on my team is that lifting and getting stronger will produce better pitching ability (mostly i am talking about velocity because seemingly this is what they are looking for). as i have stated in my intro i am a fourth year senior at my college and have been through the lifting phase of the season one to many times. to me pitching is a skill, its almost artistic. off the top of my head some close examples would be bowling or throwing darts, the reason i site these activities in relation to the idea i am questioning is because no matter what type of training outside of the act itself would seem almost a waste of time. i find it interesting that “some” people (i guess i can only speak for the people i have interacted with, but i am sure there are more) are so quick to turn to weight training to improve pitching. i have witnessed and even spent time myself doing countless workouts, running mile upon mile, throwing long toss in hope that this will make me a more effective pitcher. but could the secret be just practicing pitching more, and improving my skill to effectively get hitters out. this is just an observation and i am not totally opposed to a conditioning program, but from personal experience i feel i have lost some valuable time in improving my skill.

  • p.s i am not one of those people who claim to know everything about pitching or preach my beliefs to others. i am looking for some good discussion out of the love for pitching ! i think my philosophy on everything about pitching can be summed up in this quote “your mind is like a parachute, it only works when its open”. i hope that i have sparked some thought and cause some to question a popular topic. i know that other topic people have discussed on this forum have caused me to question the popular ideas that have been drilled into my head about pitching, and i think i have become better because of it.

At the top portion of this web page you’ll find an information bar shaded in grey and a section called “pitching Articles”. Click onto that section and search the topic that’s of interest to you. This section is an excellent start.

If I’m not being too personal - what place in the rotation does your pitching coach “block you”. In other other words, does he pre-schedule you in advance - like on a rotation schedule for a certain span of games, or are you sent in with only a couple of days notice? Are you backup for another pitcher or are you one of his main stays.

Because your a senior, and I assume this is your last year of college ball, it does make a difference with your factfinding and thus the follow up workouts and your expected results. In particular your pitch selection and what you bring to the roation as a contribution element. ( i.e. what are you noted for)

Coach B.

[quote=“AB21”]Bare with me if this topic has recently been discussed but this is something that recently i have been giving a lot of thought. currently my schools fall season is coming to a close and the popular time to hit the weight room is at hand. a major opinion of the majority of the pitchers on my team is that lifting and getting stronger will produce better pitching ability (mostly i am talking about velocity because seemingly this is what they are looking for). as i have stated in my intro i am a fourth year senior at my college and have been through the lifting phase of the season one to many times. to me pitching is a skill, its almost artistic. off the top of my head some close examples would be bowling or throwing darts, the reason i site these activities in relation to the idea i am questioning is because no matter what type of training outside of the act itself would seem almost a waste of time. i find it interesting that “some” people (i guess i can only speak for the people i have interacted with, but i am sure there are more) are so quick to turn to weight training to improve pitching. i have witnessed and even spent time myself doing countless workouts, running mile upon mile, throwing long toss in hope that this will make me a more effective pitcher. but could the secret be just practicing pitching more, and improving my skill to effectively get hitters out. this is just an observation and i am not totally opposed to a conditioning program, but from personal experience i feel i have lost some valuable time in improving my skill.

  • p.s i am not one of those people who claim to know everything about pitching or preach my beliefs to others. i am looking for some good discussion out of the love for pitching ! i think my philosophy on everything about pitching can be summed up in this quote “your mind is like a parachute, it only works when its open”. i hope that i have sparked some thought and cause some to question a popular topic. i know that other topic people have discussed on this forum have caused me to question the popular ideas that have been drilled into my head about pitching, and i think i have become better because of it.[/quote]

I totally agree but, in High School sometimes you don’t have the chance to throw and going to the weightroom is better than doing nothing. That’s what I see in my school, but it seems that what you are saying is the pitchers you interact with are hitting the weights instead of throwing.

Do some of the these players have the opportunity to pitch with someone and work on pitches and hitting locations? or is it just becuase they have no other choice but then to hit the weights?

My opinion is that conditioning in the art must be directed to be effective. If you have ambition to be a starter for example, it would be of absolute benefit to condition for endurance. I can certainly see and understand the Mets Coach Peterson and his view towards things like yoga that create strength and flexability. I think (Again my opinion) the gist of your post is somewhat indicative of…frustration(?). Perhaps this is what Coach Baker is getting at. I do think that many players spend way too much time of “cliche” type of conditioning or just doing generic, non-directed lifting and in many instances it can prove non-helpful in improving you to where you hope to go.