Objective numbers for hitters and pitchers


#1

Here’s something that may get me some input for ideas here in LTP.

I’ve been tinkering around with some numbers for hitters and pitchers to see just how much info I can produce from my basic hitting and pitching data, that a scout or a recruiter would have no way of discounting because of inferior scoring at the HS level.

http://www.infosports.com/scorekeeper/images/objnums.pdf

As far as I can see, all of those fields are pretty much objective because they have nothing to do with the scorer’s judgment. There are some things that might not be available from the basic data tracked by say a MaxPreps or some other service that allows coaches to post HS stats, but in general this is all pretty basic stuff.

Would anyone care to comment?


#2

I’m having a hard time making your numbers add up for the 1st player (Dylan Chavez).

It says he faced 169 batters
53 reached base safely
45 struck out
9 struck out looking
48 ground ball outs
32 fly ball outs

If I add all that up I get 187 - but he only faced 169. What am I missing?


#3

[quote=“oc2viking”]I’m having a hard time making your numbers add up for the 1st player (Dylan Chavez).

It says he faced 169 batters
53 reached base safely
45 struck out
9 struck out looking
48 ground ball outs
32 fly ball outs

If I add all that up I get 187 - but he only faced 169. What am I missing?[/quote]

You’re double counting K’s and K L’s. A K looking is still a strike out.

Its also possible for a batter to reach safely on a K, and those would also be double counted.

GBO’s and FBO’s aren’t intended to be used to calculate batters. All they indicate is whether or not an out was directly related to a ball hit in the air or one on the ground. So it could be a single on the ground that produced an out because of a throw.

Total Reached safely is computed by summing WALKS+HBP+ROFC+ROE+Hits. The reason I didn’t list them separately, is because HITS and ROES are not at all objective, and I only want to list objective numbers. By taking them as a total, they totally lose their subjectivity and can be tested with a true false. Did the batter reach 1st safely? Y or N.

All the numbers to the right of “Batters per Reached Safely” are only to give a better overall picture of the pitcher, not as part of any calculation.

Great question though! You made me dig out the answer, and that means you were thinking, and that’s always my intention. The more you think, the more the numbers mean something to you, and the better you’ll understand the game than the guy who doesn’t think. Knowledge is power! :wink:


#4

that’s pretty funny - I usually don’t get caught thinking too often. Just ask my wife :).

Now that you’ve explained things a bit I can have a better look at what you have here. Thanks.


#5

Is the point to create stats that are more meaningful? If that’s the case, then I don’t see how a batter reaching on an error or a fielder’s choice is a good, objective way of saying that was a “good” at bat.

If the goal is to show someone who performs the best, beyond the numbers, I’d just focus on hard hit balls, weak hit balls, pitches seen, and walks. Whether or not a batter reaches first is definitely objective, but crediting him the same whether or not he lines a single or reaches on an E-6 is defeating the purpose IMO.

Also, a scout is not going to care about high school stats all the much; college stats hold much more weight and they’re not even the be all end all. Scouts have to actually evaluate the talent and projectability of the player. A 5’6" player with no power who hits .560 will get overlooked compared to the 6’3" 220 lb. player with great speed who may “only” hit .400. Obviously a scout is not looking at the little guy who is only a high school slap hitter. That’s an extreme example, I know that not every small player is terrible.