NPA Velocity Program

http://www.nationalpitching.net/equipment.asp?

$435 for a sock/towel, weighted ball set, sand filled pilates balls, and programming on how to use them.

House said that he came to an epiphany with regards to deceleration training - don’t throw the balls, hold on to them - while watching tennis players not release their racquet. Interesting observation. I can think of someone else who trained their pitchers in a similar way and had done so for years/decades. :slight_smile:

Anyway, I personally think that price is straight-up insane. I would like to hear the opinions of others, though.

That’s an insane price.

Gotta wonder how much of the factor in the price is due to ‘branding’ vs. quality of product.

The main part of the price is the personalization portion. It is modified every few weeks after gains are made. They also use your info for their on going info for various age groups.

I would think if a person currently uses weightballs, you could probably incorporate a non throwing portion. I think the sand filled ball is 2lbs. Drills are done from the knee(House knee drill), standing and with forward motion. The sock is used after each overload ball is used. This is what I have been “loosely” told.

There is one upside to the whole thing…

If you are a kid with a minimum wage paying job, it’s going to cost you about 70 hours of work to get it. Good motivation to put the program through its paces.

If you are a parent and you invest that kind of money…you are going to be all over your kid making sure he follows through with the program to the T.

NPA should bundle a P90X Tony Horton 90 Day Extreme Home Fitness Workout DVD Program - retail $140. Make the package an even half a grand. Your kid can gain 4 mph on his fastball while your wife loses 20 lbs.

:shock: :stuck_out_tongue:

:lol:

Too funny Dino too too funny

We have done this for a few years now. I think we all know who else has been doing this for 20+ years. :wink:

Could it be the most controversial pitching coach of all time?

He did do at least one thing right. He caught Hank Aaron’s 715th home run ball and gave it right back to him. So , not only was he a pitcher but he was a catcher too.

I’m not sure you can call him a pitching coach, but yeah, it’d be him. And “most controversial” would imply he had some reach, which he doesn’t, really.