NPA Camp Indianapolis

My son and I had a great weekend at the NPA Clinic in Indianapolis this weekend. The lecture from Tom House on Friday night was awesome. You can really tell by the way he speaks that this is a passion for him and it shows.

The two days of working with James Evans during the actual clinic and throwing part were amazing. The guy is the real deal and helped my son out with a few adjustments that made an immediate impact on his throwing. I think turnout was a little lower at the camp than what they were hoping for but it did benefit my son with more one on one attention.

If you ever get a chance to go to one of these I highly suggest going.
Here is video of my son working with James during a bullpen.


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I noticed one thing although I respect those guy’s opinions. Your son needs to relax his upper half at leg plant. He begins to move his shoulders forward before leg landing and doesn’t gain his potential torque that will make him explode out front. Looks really good with command though and that’s really what matters.

Awesome, munster! The kid’s stuff looks filthy…

Very nice. One thing I’ve noticed about the NPA guys I’ve met is, as you noticed, they have a passion for what they do. That doesn’t mean others are any less passionate about what they teach, it’s just very consistent with the NPA. Like most organizations I believe that starts at the top with Tom House.

Looks like Jamie was focusing on getting the lower half going quicker to home plate, thus the crossover setup and the count. I think Roger predicted this in an earlier thread. Keep up the good work.

Yes Roger nailed it, he was working on getting the lower half moving a little quicker with him.

They also had him working on his head movement, he tends to move it forward too quickly as well.

Now he needs to work on not tripping over the mound!

I would claim that this starts with the glove - better stabilization out front will allow the shoulders to stay closed longer.

Couldn’t agree more! It’s one of the reasons I travel to California every year to get re-certified. House and the NPA offer a very positive and inspirational environment. I come home really excited and motivated.

How did he like going off of a mound, this is the first time LTP gets to see him from the bump, isn’t it?
I’m so proud of the development and growth you guys have had and am jealous for the special time I know you guys had…man I sure miss those days (I still get to steal some great moments, but usually not and entire weekend of this sort).
Temp mound, talking to the instructor and going too quickly (So mechanically we aren’t seeing him “really”) but I’m thinking he’s doing great and progressing in supurb fashion…

[quote=“jdfromfla”]How did he like going off of a mound, this is the first time LTP gets to see him from the bump, isn’t it?
I’m so proud of the development and growth you guys have had and am jealous for the special time I know you guys had…man I sure miss those days (I still get to steal some great moments, but usually not and entire weekend of this sort).
Temp mound, talking to the instructor and going too quickly (So mechanically we aren’t seeing him “really”) but I’m thinking he’s doing great and progressing in supurb fashion…[/quote]

It think your right, it is the first time you have seen him on the bump. He will get some time on it this summer as he moves up to 14U. I am not sure why but in this area nobody has a mound until 14U and then it is only some of the fields.

He does like throwing from the mound. We have an indoor practice facility that we go to over the winter and he throws off one there. The only problem is that it is about a 25 mile drive to get there.

I have a suggestion – taking nothing away from the folks who are instructing here.

Take the glove off, then pitch without it. I wouldn’t be surprised if the youngster does 100% better … smoother, more relaxed, and forward momentum enhanced.

That glove is not only ill-fitted to the youngster, he’s not using it to compliment his size and other proportions relative to his ability to balance himself throughout his delivery. (12 inch gloves are pitcher friendly.)

Start off by suggesting shorter steps with his stride leg, don’t really concentrate on releasing the ball until his stride foot is firmly … and I do mean firmly,… planted on the ground. In fact, a few dry runs with planting the stride foot,… THEN … progressing with his forward delivery is a common exercise to enhance the feeling of forward motion advantages with release, and all the other stuff that goes along.

Coach B.

Thanks Coach B

The glove is something we have talked about but i have not won that battle yet.

One of the things that an ill-fitted glove will do to a youngster in training, is to focus and draw some of that youngster’s attention on the glove hand itself … instead on other things that compliment his development.

Notice in the video how the glove acts like the center of the attention during the set-up phase and all through the release phase. This youngster’s body gravitates around the glove … which hangs down around his belt line from beginning to end. Also, this “beginning to end” influence has a impact on his release phase. Notice how flat his delivery arm is during his release phase, from time to time.

Basically, the body is divided into platforms - legs, hips, torso, shoulders, arms-pitch/glove side … each with their own contribution to your son’s delivery and command of his pitch inventory (fastball, slider, etc…) These platforms also have a “pass it along” kind of compliment from beginning to end. Your son is just starting to realize that any one of these platforms that DO NOT pass along a compliment for the next platform to build upon shortchanges the entire package … namely … him.

I’m sure in the process of your experience with the NPA folks that much of what I’m mentioning here will be covered … but with far more expertise and detail that I can elaborate on.

I would like to mention one thing that is in your son’s favor … you dad. You’ve gone to the lengths of acquiring talent that’ll keep you son safe and healthy while experiencing this sport - - in particular, pitching. Now I am not a member of the NPA, nor do I actively promote or sell their products and services. But, they do seem to have a good repore with those they interact with and they do seem to have a good reputation.

Again, you son is very lucky to have a dad that acquires the talent for instructing your son. My compliments sir.

Coach B.

Thanks Coach, I think it is all part of being a parent.

More on the glove, we are going shopping. After checking around on the web there are a lot of great deals right now.

Finding the right glove that “just feels right” is not too complicated. It has a lot to do with fit, personal impression, and balancing one with comfort. Your boy will know it when he tries the right glove on … it’s just the right glove at the right time.

The large box stores have an impressive collection of gloves - even at this time of the year. Try on as many as possible, got through the pitching motions, slow and easy does it, see how the glove seems to compliment the process.

There’s no substitute for just the right feel and comfort. And believe or not, your son will know it when he slips the right one on. I would however suggest a 11 inch, 12 inch, or12.5 inch glove size. The glove size in plainly marked (stamped) on the glove.

When you purchase the glove, try some of the “mom-n-pop” sporting goods stores near you. This time of the year they want to get rid of inventory and starting a good relationship with these people can help you in the future. Also, you can be sure of what your getting. Sometimes ordering gloves over the web can get you a product that you didn’t order due to mix ups, out of stock substitutes, and a host of other things. But on the other hand, I know some people have done very well over the web.

In any event, have your son try on as many gloves as he can, different manufacturers, different styles. You can also visit the web by all the glove brands and they have a position guide – pitcher’s gloves, infielder’s gloves, and so on.

Just one more thing - don’t be surprised to fine some serious money in the works for pro models and those that have special features. Some of these items can run in the hundreds. ( $200 - $400) However, like I said before, trying on many and getting the feel for one that’s just right can take a lot of the guess work out of it.

Coach B.