No windup for 10 yr old


#1

So the other day at rec league my son starts to warm-up to pitch an inning, and he’s doing it out of the stretch. I ask him why, since I’ve spent a couple of dollars with pitching lessons, and he tells me his coach, who’s watched him throw all of 20 pitches, says the wind-up is too many movements for a 10 yr old. So, before I say anything if this comes up again I’d like some input.

And FWIW, my son is a pretty athletic kid who had thrown 5+ innings of 1 run ball at a TT tourney the weekend before.


#2

We’ve talked about this quite a bit over the years on LTP (I’ll try to link to some of those posts for you), and I think the general consensus is that it’s perfectly fine for these young guys such as your son to pitch out of the stretch. It’s true that there is less movement, hence less that can technically go wrong with the delivery and the more accurate a pitcher usually is.

I’m not for or against it. I pitched from the full starting out and only went from the stretch full-time in pro ball. But I was a closer then; I was a starter all throughout up to that point.

It’s not going to impact his future development going from the stretch. So I wouldn’t get too worried about it. Just keep working on both the stretch and the full in your practices with your son away from the field.


#3

I understand what you’re saying. On the other hand, if a kid can pitch well from a wind-up why would one encourage him not to do so, or the other way around?

I don’t know what others see in their leagues, but it’s my opinion that ours dumbs the game down. They teach the kids it’s OK to screw up, it’s OK not to try, it’s OK to lose. Not that I feel winning is everything, but one shouldn’t be “OK” with losing.

What really bothers me is this coach didn’t really take the time to actually evaluate my son, it’s just “you’re 10, you can’t do that”. So, because his son can’t do it well, or the assistant’s son, or any of the other kids, then surly mine can’t.

But in the end you’re right, it’s not the end of the world. I’ll tell the kid to suck it up and do as the coach says. Thank god for travel ball.


#4

I don’t dictate one way or the other whether young kids pitch from the wind-up or the stretch. It seems most young kids start off mimicing their favorite pro from the wind-up so they tend to be more practiced from the wind-up than the stretch by the time I get to work with them.

Also, I don’t think the wind-up is an appropriate “fix” for posture and balance problems because it’s too easy for coaches to simply mandate pitching from the stretch and just leave it at that without really addressing the issues.

Besides, it’s fun to pitch from the wind-up.


#5

If your son has a pitching coach whom you and he trust, pitch with the mechanics he’s been taught, IMO. I would say that this includes whether to go from the stretch or wind up. My 12 year old uses both and a quarter kick mixed in to try to keep runners honest.
I’ve had coaches try to correct my son’s mechanics to fit what they believed was the “right” way, including only throwing from the stretch. I’ve instructed him to listen to their advice, say “yes sir” and do what he knows is right. I will explain the differences to the coach, if he can understand, and most do.
There are too many coaches in youth baseball, from rec to travel, that have no more idea of pitching mechanics than what they learned in this or that video.
The bottom line, again IMO, is that your son is on the hill all alone, not the coach, and it’s your son that needs to be comfotable and confident up there, not the coach.


#6

[quote=“Turn 22”]
There are too many coaches in youth baseball, from rec to travel, that have no more idea of pitching mechanics than what they learned in this or that video.
[/quote]

I’d feel a little better if I thought he had watched some vid, read something, anything. But I have a sneaking suspension he’s relying on he was taught back in '63, “when I pitched, and was dam good at it”. LOL


#7

[quote=“SomeBaseballDad”][quote=“Turn 22”]
There are too many coaches in youth baseball, from rec to travel, that have no more idea of pitching mechanics than what they learned in this or that video.
[/quote]

I’d feel a little better if I thought he had watched some vid, read something, anything. But I have a sneaking suspension he’s relying on he was taught back in '63, “when I pitched, and was dam good at it”. LOL[/quote]

I feel your pain LOL. I wish I had the time to coach, but there aren’t enough hours in the day.


#8

I can’t tell you what is right or wrong in your situation, but here is what I do.

My son’s 10th birthday is today and he is the youngest kid on his Little League team. The past 2 years I have been teaching first-time pitchers and even this year I am working with one 11-year old with a strong arm but he has never pitched before.

The way I approach is it I ask the kid what he wants to do, and if he wants to go from the wind-up, then I make sure he has a controlled motion minimizing side-to-side movements. The bottom line is that the last 2/3rd of the pitching motion is the same from wind up or stretch, it’s alla a matter of how you get there. If he/she can achieve proper arm separation and balance posittion from a wind-up, then I have no problem with that.

Once they get going with things, I do tell them that if they are going to play in a league that allows lead-offs, it IS important to learn to pitch from the stretch position.


#9

I haven’t seen anything in your posts where YOU actually talked to the coach to find out why he wants your kid to work a certain way. Perhaps he saw something in his delivery that warranted the change. As a coach of a youth team myself - I make it a point to work with the parents of my pitchers to find out what they are learning outside of our practices so as to not derail their learning process. However - if I see something that I think will help the kid I will introduce it to the kid and tell the parents why I did it so that they in turn can communicate the same to the private instructor - and I also ask for any feedback the private instructor gave. When parents start having their kids play for multiple teams and getting private lessons - there is bound to be some differences of opinions on how to do things and it’s the parents responsibility to keep them sorted out AND well communicated between the coaches.


#10

:allgood:

I always tell my pitchers that play for other teams or work with other instructors that if I say something that contradicts what they’re being told but the other coach/instructor then they should let me know so we can discuss it and work things out. It’s all about helping the kids and confusing them or giving them contradicting instruction doesn’t help.


#11

Myself, it I were a kids rec league coach, and I knew this player had a paid pitching coach, I would take a hands off approach. Even if I saw the kid doing something fundamentally wrong I’d be hard pressed to say something. I just don’t need the grief.

Now as to my son’s TT coach, I went so far as to take him to a lesson just so he could see what was being taught, just made sense to me.

Thanks for the replies. It turned out the rec coach didn’t press it and Keegs pitched 5 innings of 2 run ball the other night, both out of the stretch and wind-up. If I could get him to understand there’s a difference between being a pitcher vs just a thrower, and to think a little, and to trust his change, it would have been a shutout. 8)


#12

Memo to “some baseball dad”: You said in your last post that there’s a big difference between being a pitcher and being just a thrower. How true! I remember when Allie Reynolds came to the Yankees from the Cleveland Indians, back in 1946. He was, at the time, more of a thrower, inclined to be wild at times, not having all his stuff together. In 1948 Ed Lopat came to the Yankees from the Chicago White Sox, and he saw what was up with Reynolds and took him in hand, sitting him down and telling him about repertoire—about stuff. He also noticed that Reynolds was rushing his delivery too much, and he slowed him down, taught him to pace himself better and to change speeds on all his pitches. And so Mr. Lopat turned Reynolds from a thrower whose fast ball exceeded 100 miles an hour into a very fine pitcher whose fast ball exceeded 100 miles an hour.
As for pitching with or without a windup, have you ever seen Don Larsen—he of no-no-no fame? He started working with a no-windup delivery, and it really paid off for him, and not just in that World Series game. So I guess it’s a matter of which way your kid is more comfortable and what enables him to be more effective, with better control. A lot of pitchers nowadays are using the no-windup delivery, by the way. :slight_smile: :baseballpitcher:


#13

i pitched from the stretch all little league. now i pitch like don sutton wind up. but pitch from my old way with a runer on base


#14

I think its up to the kid, it makes the hitter see different angles when you throw from both the windup and stretch but it shouldn’t make a difference as to verlocity etc. If the kid is ready for it then he should have a windup and stretch but it is less to work on if you only go stretch.


#15

[quote=“SomeBaseballDad”]Myself, it I were a kids rec league coach, and I knew this player had a paid pitching coach, I would take a hands off approach. Even if I saw the kid doing something fundamentally wrong I’d be hard pressed to say something. I just don’t need the grief.

[/quote]

Ditto. I coach LL and keep hands off with kids who’s parents pay good money for pitching lessons. I may talk to the parent, but I’m not interfering with his mechanics. For kids who don’t have a pitching coach, I still ask thier parents if they want me to give them some pointers. And I ask if they want to go with the full wind up or the stretch. My preference is the stretch since it’s simpler to teach pitching concepts, but if the kid wants to go from the delivery, then we start the lesson at the leg lift and go forward. Doesn’t really matter to me.

My son pitches solely from the strecth and it works for him. The other four pitchers use full delivery. To each his own. :slight_smile: