No Warmups before throwing?


#1

Players from 13 to 19 years old do not warmup before they throw. They go for a light jog and just play catch.

What are your thoughts on this?


#2

Dumb. Not educated. I could go on but that sums it up in 3 words.


#3

The opposite of what you just said. The older the pitcher gets, the more important stretching and preparing become. Not only because as you age your muscles, joints, tendons, etc become less flexible, but you are putting a LOT more force on them and they need to be properly warmed up and they need to stay warmed as long as you will be in a game.


#4

I couldn’t agree more! A pitcher has to be properly warmed up before coming into a game, whether as a starter or as a reliever. He has to know beforehand what pitches are going to work for him and which ones need to be put on the shelf for the game in question, and the only way to determine this is to warm up for a good ten or fifteen minutes. And if a relief pitcher has to come into the game in a crash emergency he’s allowed as much time as is needed to be properly warmed up and ready to pitch—very major leaguer knows this. Even Mariano Rivera, who needed only eight or ten pitches to be ready, had to take time to warm up, to stretch out and loosen his muscles—the whole idea of just jumping in there and pitching is not only ridiculous but actually potentially injurious. :baseballpitcher:


#5

When you mentioned … " just a light jog … etc…", that can have a meaning that can be interpreted in many ways.

In the coaching circles of athletics, there is a method of preparing athletes called . Sometimes, this can be misinterpreted as just a “jog” to those that are not familiar with the system(s). Not that I’m implying what you witnessed is any less in your eyes as “just a jog.”

During the end of my career as a pitching coach, I attended a preview of this kind of “prep”, and to many in attendance, it was a departure from what I had been accustomed to. In fact many who attended, like myself, were well into our late 50’s, and thought … gimmick, gimmick, gimmick. But not any more. Going one step further, any pitching coach who really wants to see who’s prepared for a days pay and who’s not, let the dynamic stretching routines do it’s thing and watch who starts to slack off - bingo … that individual is a prime candidate for an injury(s), or has issues worth addressing on the spot.


#6

Makes me think a couple of things.
Ignorant coaches. The blaming of the coaches only goes so far.
These players may very well also complain about sore arms.
Lazy players.
If the coach offers nothing the player and or parents need to figure out for themselves.