New Mom to forum


#1

Hello everyone,

Sure glad I found this site.

I’d like to introduce myself as I know I will be on this site quite often, Maybe not posting but surely reading everything

My son Robbie, will be 10 on July 21st of this year and has been in little league baseball since the age of 3 1/2.

We live in northern Ontario, Canada in a small town called Timmins, you may have heard of it. Shania Twain comes from Timmins as well as many many hockey players.

Last year at the age of 8, my son Robbie was tested with a radar gun and his fastball was clocked at 69 mph. This year I do not know. All I know is that the kids cannot hit his balls and they are all afraid of his balls.

This is his first year as a pitcher and I (and his dad) am reading all the information I can to help him out and also (I only found out!) how not to injure his arm at an early age.

He is really an awesome pitcher for his age and would love a baseball career, but unfortunately for him, I think his career will be short lived living in such a remote area of Canada.

I would love to read stories of how other people have overcome small town obstacles as well as all the politics that come with small town sports.

Thanks for reading and hope to meet all of you.

Mom


#2

Your son’s pitches soom really hard for his age , thats good.
Remeber not to over work him. Refrain from throwing sliders or curves at his age , dont throw curves till 15 and dont even think about sliders yet.If your son desires to learn a secondary pitch allow him to learn how to throw change ups. when you’re younger kids misinterpret how change ups are thrown , ive seen 12 yr olds trying to throw a change up by just slowing down their arm. This is the incorrect thing to do.
This is how i throw my change up its difficult at first just try to keep the ball low.

http://www.oddball-mall.com/knucklertalk/viewthread.php?tid=3130[/url]


#3

Robbie’s-Mom
Welcome to the board!! It’s good to see another Canuck here. I’m from Halifax. There are lots of very helpful people here. My advice to you is to continue to read as much as you can but not only here. You might also want to try hsbaseballweb.com. It has a pitching forum also.

You should also get video of your son throwing at game level effort from the back (2nd base), front (behind catcher) and open side (3rd base for a righty, 1st for a lefty). Find a way to post them. You can also PM some of the people on this site who’s posts you’ve read much of and find knowledgeable. Just remember one thing. EVERYONE here is giving their OPINIONS only. Some have had more experience at it than others but they’re still only OPINIONS.

That being said, Roger and Chinmusic are a couple of the better ones to read posts from. If you read mine and still want to contact me (despite my posts :smiley: ) PM me and you can send me video directly and I’ll give you my OPINIONS.

Again, welcome, fellow Canadian.


#4

Thanks for the replies.

You read my mind. I was looking at other videos on this site today and thought this would be an excellent venue to have his pitching abilities evaluated. My husband and I are definitely not that knowledgeable of pitching.

Right now he is mostly using the 4 seam and 2 seam. I have ordered him 2 videos which should be arriving shortly. I have read and printed all the different pitches and you are right, everywhere I read, they all advise not to get into any fancy balls until at least the age of 15.

My biggest concern right now is that he is, at present, in a growth spurt and our Little League does not use the pitch count. At one of his games last week I told the coaches to pull him off the mound as I could see he was at his limit. (I was right!)

I have gotten him to read the replies I received, because to him, he is indestructable and nothing will ever hurt him. Thank you, as he now sees it’s not just mom blowing air.

He has Tuesday and Wednesday games and I will see if I can get some good enough footage to post here.

Thanks for the advice and any/all opinions are always valid. They are opinions.


#5

Don’t let DM fool ya’. :wink: He knows his stuff too.

And he’s right about the opinions. Some know more than others but even the “gurus” are still figuring things out. Just keep an open mind and you’re bound to learn a thing or two.


#6

If you’re looking for other places to find opinions here a site i go to often:
http://www.oddball-mall.com/knucklertalk/index.php

Good job pulling him off the mound , althought it was the coahces job , he should be protecting his player.Good job !!^^


#7

If he works and stays healthy it sounds like he’s on a great path for a solid career already. Having parents interested in pitching and willing to work with him at a young age is excellent.

Just a few thoughts about small towns and remote locations:

Curt Schilling is from Alaska and I have to say he is a heck of a pitcher.
I know we’ve got an active poster from Alaska even, and there have been several posters from canada from time to time, even I know of one for a fact from Australia.

My dad grew up in a small farming town, now I don’t know of anyone from his generation making it to the tops of the baseball ranks, but actually a guy he went to school with son, they still live in the small town and the dad teaches Gym class, but anyways the son just received 2nd team All-American honors in Div 1 College baseball and got drafted in the 6th round this year.
As huge as the internet has grown, and other services players can make use of to get themselves noticed, the old adage is never more true, “Where there’s a will there’s a way.”


#8

[quote=“Robbie’s-Mom”]Hello everyone,

Sure glad I found this site.

I’d like to introduce myself as I know I will be on this site quite often, Maybe not posting but surely reading everything

My son Robbie, will be 10 on July 21st of this year and has been in little league baseball since the age of 3 1/2.

We live in northern Ontario, Canada in a small town called Timmins, you may have heard of it. Shania Twain comes from Timmins as well as many many hockey players.

Last year at the age of 8, my son Robbie was tested with a radar gun and his fastball was clocked at 69 mph. This year I do not know. All I know is that the kids cannot hit his balls and they are all afraid of his balls.

This is his first year as a pitcher and I (and his dad) am reading all the information I can to help him out and also (I only found out!) how not to injure his arm at an early age.

He is really an awesome pitcher for his age and would love a baseball career, but unfortunately for him, I think his career will be short lived living in such a remote area of Canada.

I would love to read stories of how other people have overcome small town obstacles as well as all the politics that come with small town sports.

Thanks for reading and hope to meet all of you.

Mom[/quote] One thing that i have always heard that if you throw with good mechanics, the best way to preserve your arm is to throw often. If you throw maybe 50 pitches every other day or so, it really helps to prevent injuries in games


#9

Robbie’s Mom,

Welcome to the forum. I am not trying to throw cold water on your parade; however, some facts in your OP do need discussion.

As an 8 yo, pitching velocity of 69 mph is virtually unheard of. To put this into perspective for you, Dr. Michael J. Axe’s actuarial table of velocity expectations vs age suggests the following:

The average 8 yo can be expected to throw a baseball at 40 mph. At one standard deviation above the norm, perhaps 33% of 8 yo throwers can be expected to throw 43 mph. Two std devs above the norm for 8 yo is 47 mph. When you get to the extremely rare 1-in-a-million arm among 8 yo throwers, 5 std devs above the norm, the expectation is 57 mph.

In fact, 68 mph is in the 5th std dev group for 11 yos and it is somewhere between the 1st and 2nd standard deviation for 14 yo throwers.

Let’s get real, please.

It is somewhat more than likely, in my opinion, that your son was clocked with a radar gun that was set to a Km/h readout. All high quality radar will give velocity in miles per hour or kilometers per hour; it’s the operator’s choice.

However, if the reading was actually 69 Km/h, that translates to 43 mph–about 1 standard deviation from the norm among 8 yos.

Does this make sense?


#10

Here’s all I can tell you, I come from a small town in south west Wyoming. I was always the dominant pitcher in my league and I’m still pretty good, if your son works hard enough he can have a baseball career. But for right now I would just try to keep him throwing you don’t want him doing anything more than maybe dream about pitching in the world series one day. Just make sure he has fun and he’ll stick with baseball. Try to get him with a pitching a coach if thats possible if not try to post a video of him on the Mechanics forum and I’m sure the people on this forum will help you out.

Good Luck.


#11

[quote=“laflippin”]Robbie’s Mom,

Welcome to the forum. I am not trying to throw cold water on your parade; however, some facts in your OP do need discussion.

As an 8 yo, pitching velocity of 69 mph is virtually unheard of. To put this into perspective for you, Dr. Michael J. Axe’s actuarial table of velocity expectations vs age suggests the following:

The average 8 yo can be expected to throw a baseball at 40 mph. At one standard deviation above the norm, perhaps 33% of 8 yo throwers can be expected to throw 43 mph. Two std devs above the norm for 8 yo is 47 mph. When you get to the extremely rare 1-in-a-million arm among 8 yo throwers, 5 std devs above the norm, the expectation is 57 mph.

In fact, 68 mph is in the 5th std dev group for 11 yos and it is somewhere between the 1st and 2nd standard deviation for 14 yo throwers.

Let’s get real, please.

It is somewhat more than likely, in my opinion, that your son was clocked with a radar gun that was set to a Km/h readout. All high quality radar will give velocity in miles per hour or kilometers per hour; it’s the operator’s choice.

However, if the reading was actually 69 Km/h, that translates to 43 mph–about 1 standard deviation from the norm among 8 yos.

Does this make sense?[/quote]

agreed…


#12

[quote]Posted: Jun 23, 2006 Post subject: New Mom to forum

[/quote]Its all good…I wonder what Robbie is throwing like today?


#13

[quote=“Dino”][quote]Posted: Jun 23, 2006 Post subject: New Mom to forum

[/quote]Its all good…I wonder what Robbie is throwing like today?[/quote]

I was thinkin’ the same thing dino reno!


#14

Doh!

From the date of the OP, that could’ve almost been Robbie Nen’s mom :lol:


#15

[quote=“laflippin”]Doh!

From the date of the OP, that could’ve almost been Robbie Nen’s mom :lol:[/quote]

Hahahaha, yeah I think I saw some cobwebs on the way into this topic…


#16

If your son DOES throw 69, which I’m not saying he doesn’t, keep him healthy. A good diet along with icing, and LIGHT jogs sometimes. He may seem young, but with an arm like that, you gotta keep it fresh.

(I’m 13 and I throw 73.) Your kid sounds like a stud to me. Best of luck! :smiley:


#17

Robbie is turning 12 soon…I wonder if he is throwing mid 80’s by now. I wonder when Robbie’s mom will post another update…Maybe when he is drafted :twisted:


#18

To Robbie’s Mom: Welcome aboard, and you can be sure you’re finding all sorts of good stuff to read on this site.
About throwing every day: My pitching coach of many moons ago—he was a key member of the Yankees’ fabled Big Three pitching rotation—believed in doing just that, throwing every day, because he felt that this was an excellent way to keep the arm loose and flexible and avoid all kinds of trouble. What I used to do was alternate between just playing catch for about twenty minutes one day and doing a bullpen session the next, during which time I would work on a new pitch, refine an existing one, or concentrate on sharpening up one or another aspect of mechanics. And if I had to relieve between starts, pitch an inning or two late in a game, that counted as throwing every day.
One thing I would suggest is that Robbie start working on a changeup—he’s about to turn 12, right? That’s about the right time to develop a good one. I would recommend one of my favorites—the palm ball, which is not difficult to pick up (that was the first one I acquired, and it was a honey) because you throw it with the same arm motion and the same arm speed as the fast ball; it’s the grip that does it. Babe Ruth, who knew a little about pitching :), once said that a good change will cause batters more grief than just about anything else, and he was so right—quite a few major leaguers use a devastating changeup as their strikeout pitch.
Again, welcome to the forum. 8)


#19

Boy 69 is fast for my junior high league let alone an 8 year old are you sure it isn’t kilometers per hour?


#20

This Robbie is getting to be a dang urban ledgend…

I made a tremendous mistake orginally when I said Robbie was soon going to be 12. Actually he is going to be 14 since the original post was June 23, 2006 and Robbie’s Mom said he was turning 10 in 2006. By now he must be an Eagle Scout, flown solo in an airplane, sings the Canadian National Anthem for the Maple Leafs and canoed across Lake Ontario to the US in world record time.

That dang Robbie…he’s one of a kind. I wonder what DI school is recruiting him??? :twisted: