Need some analysis from the crowd


#1

My son just turned 10 last month.
He was the star pitcher in his minors division, striking out 10+ players in each game he pitched. I don’t recall him giving up more than 4 or 5 hits this season.

Lately though, he’s been playing on the All Star team and facing much better competition, which he wasn’t used to…so while he’s still doing well, it’s definately a learning experience, which will be helpful as he moves to majors next year and faces 12 years olds.

Anyway, the following two videos were close up for analysis of motion (I don’t like the way his right foot is landing, and want him to pull the glove through more.

The other is just for fun, alternating pitches. He’s around 47mph with his fastball, 38 with the change up, and 31-32 with a killer knuckleball.

Would love to hear from some experienced pitchers (high school or above) who might have some tips.

Regards
Steve

All fastballs http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmhhFf46q-k

Fast vs. Knuckleball http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIzIiNhymhE


#2

Well it seems you have all the equiptment which says your very into his pitching. Is he into the pitching as much as you are?? If your willing to spend the money on the mound and gun and bucket of balls maby you should invest in a smaller glove?

It seems his glove is a bit big. I’m not the person to say oh go out and buy a glove because his isn’t good enough but seeing that you have all this equiptment maby you should.

Now mechanically he’s only 10 so I’d work on tucking his glove. It’s a habbit you don’t want when your older. Get him to tuck that glove in. Check some pro clips to see what I’m talking about.

Also, he’s throwing his pitches too fast. Give him a breather. Even if your using a video. Let him just pitch don’t force him to throw a lot.


#3

Thanks Bower. I appreciate the feedback.

Jesse is lucky because he’s the youngest of my three boys (my oldest is 18) an so we already had all the toys :slight_smile:

He’s very, very much into pitching…probably because he’s always been relatively shy and insecure feeling shadowed by his siblings…and all the sudden he really came alive this year and began to shine on his own (much more so than the older ones).

We have a smaller glove from last season. I’ll have him switch to that one.

Can anyone speak to the right foot landing? I always thought it should be more on the toe than flat footed…

Oh…btw…he was only pitching that fast as an excersize to squeeze what we could into a 60 sec video clip. He’d never do that otherwise…

Regards

Steve


#4

He looks good but remember for him to keep that glove tucked in. Also dont have him throw a lot of changeups and knuckleballs. He is young and you should focus on throwing hard and throwing strikes.


#5

Yea that’s what I figured but I had to say it anyways because it’s not healthy to be throwing like that.


#6

Looks pretty good. Keep having him work on his fastball and change. Don’t let him throw a curveball even if the other kids are. Keep the glove tucked. One thing I would do different would not take so big of step to the side maybe a little step kind of like Mark Prior. Ill see if I can find a clip for you.

Chandler


#7

See in his windup he takes a little step not moving his head so much


#8

[quote=“chandler2109”]Looks pretty good. Keep having him work on his fastball and change. Don’t let him throw a curveball even if the other kids are. Keep the glove tucked. One thing I would do different would not take so big of step to the side maybe a little step kind of like Mark Prior. Ill see if I can find a clip for you.

Chandler[/quote]
I agree with Chandler about the last part of Mark Prior. Prior has almost flawless mechanics.


#9

Thanks everyone.
What a great reource

Anything on tha right foot landing?

Regards

Steve


#10

[quote=“stevertr”]Thanks everyone.
What a great reource

Anything on tha right foot landing?

Regards

Steve[/quote]

I think his right foot is fine I think it got wild there because he was rushing for the video.


#11

I think you should leave him the way he is. Hes doing great as you claim and hes a child. Usually around 14 15 yrs of age you would incorporate better mechanics into his delivery. If your son is too fine now then it may mess him up in the future. Pitching is a stepping process. Let him grow into the mechanics that will fit him. Then when he starts building up that arm strength you start working with him to reduce injury and to maximize power.


#12

Here are my recommendations:

(1) Have him learn to keep his head upright. He tilts it to the left right at the beginning of his delivery. This can lead to other posture and balance issues later in the delivery which, in turn, lead to an inconsistent release point.

(2) The next thing I’d have him work on is keeping his head more stable and minimizing the posture changes during the delivery. (This is related to (1) above.) If you watch his head in the video, it first moves toward 1B when he takes his rocker step. Then, as he lifts his knee, he tilts it as described above. Then, as he begins his stride, he collapses his back leg and his head takes a big dip. It also moves toward 3B as he ends at the waist to get into a posture he has the strength to maintain through the rest of the stride.

So, adjustments I’d recommend to help stabilize his head - and, therefore, his posture - are to minimize the rocker step to the side and start in a more athletic stance so he doesn’t have to adjust into that during his delivery. Start with the knees bent a tiny bit to reduce the dip. And start with the torso bent forward at the waist a tiny bit to reduce the posture change toward 3B during the delivery.

(3) As others have pointed out, he really needs to stabilize his glove. At foot plant, the glove should be positioned somewhere out front above the front foot. As the shoulders rotate, the glove-side elbow should tuck down below and maybe a little in front of the armpit, and the glove should turn over so the palm faces his chest or face. The glove arm should firm up to create a stable base for the throwing arm to throw against. He should bring his chest to the glove. Keeping the glove up in front will not only provide some front-side stability but it will also allow him to better protect himself (especially his face) from a line drive hit back at him which will be more important next year when he faces the older kids.

Your son is still a young fellow so I wouldn’t get too carried away. But these changes to improve stability will set a good foundation to build upon. Once he’s got these things down, then he can work on other things.