My Weight Loss

Before I started my weight lifting program, I weighed about 274 lbs. I went to get a physical about two months ago, in October, and weighed in at 264 1/4 lbs. and listed at 6’0" (they had to get that wrong, I know I’m taller than that), anyways now I got on a scale, and weighed in at 258 lbs. that’s 16 pounds in 4 months of work (Started Mid August and still going.) My goal for the Off season was 20 lbs. I’m almost there, but I wont stop there! The more pounds the better. I want to get down to 230 by senior year, have a body frame like this guy when I get older:

:wink:
I just wanted to let yall know :smiley:
I just HOPE this work translates to the Field and some cheddar cheese on the fastball, by spring. But hey, they all say hard work pays off, I sure can’t wait to see it Pay off.

It’s all good, man. I did my “bulking” phase and now I weigh about 250 lbs. Like you, I’m starting my cutting phase now and will be down to 220 lbs. before the season starts.

My squat/deadlift got where I wanted them (435/500, respectively) and I hope to retain a decent amount of that strength after I diet down to March.

Good luck!

Wow you squat and dead lift over 400 lbs? You’re a BEAST!

You play in College? HS?

I also had a pretty nice transformation this offseason. I started lifting early october, weighed 155lbs at 6’3. Now im 172(and a little leaner), with a 305lbs squat and im going to attempt to deadlift 345lbs today (i got 335 up last week after killing myself with 4 prior sets.)

[quote=“JR.Navarro34”]Wow you squat and dead lift over 400 lbs? You’re a BEAST!

You play in College? HS?[/quote]

435 squat 500 deadlift is not all that impressive, but thanks. :slight_smile:

Oh, my playing days are long gone. Now I’m just a coach and beer-league player for the fun of the game!

Bro, 500 deadlift? That’s beasty.

Is that something I should aim for in the future? I mean, do pro and college training consist of 400+ lbs lifts?

[quote=“JR.Navarro34”]Bro, 500 deadlift? That’s beasty.

Is that something I should aim for in the future? I mean, do pro and college training consist of 400+ lbs lifts?[/quote]

Double BW deadlift at 250 lbs. is merely decent, but I’m happy with the progress. I train with guys my size who pull 700 no problem.

You know the workout program that I recommend ALL THE TIME in this forum? I did it myself. I went from a relatively untrained novice (minus the squat, I’ve always trained that) with a 225 lb. deadlift and 230 lb. squat to an intermediate lifter with 435 squat 500 deadlift in just seven months. Yes, SEVEN months. It doesn’t take long. It just takes dedication and good programming. And protein.

Pro and collegiate training varies widely, but I can tell you this: If you get strong in the squat and deadlift, you will see serious results. Eric Cressey’s professional pitchers do tons of squat and deadlift variants day in and day out at his facility.

Also consider that I’m an old has-been (never-was, actually). I’m 26. Most of you guys are 14-18 years old. Don’t waste your opportunity. I wish I had taken training this serious in high school. Maybe I would have done something other than play club-level college baseball.

So what was the workout program that you did yourself?

Workout three times a week.
Squat 3x5 every workout day
Bench 3x5 every other workout day
OH Press 3x5 every other workout day
Deadlift 1x5 every other workout day
Power Clean 5x3 every other workout day (alternated these with Pendlay Rows)

Basically alternate the Bench and OH Press. Alternate the Deadlift and Power Clean. So workout days look like:

Squat
Bench
Deadlift

Squat
Press
Power Clean

I suggest a few changes, but that’s it. I would have added pull-ups and subbed neutral grip work for the Bench and OH Press, but what’s done is done. :slight_smile:

Programming doesn’t have to be difficult to succeed. In fact, it shouldn’t be. BTW, this is the basic framework for Mark Rippetoe’s Starting Strength.

kevinbert, don’t start serious weight training at 12. there are better ways to spend your time until you are 14 to 15 (depending on your maturity). work on your throwing motion, technique, and fastball, breaking pitch, change right now. that will get you where you need to go.

Well, I stick to some core exercises, chinups, pushups, and some body-weight squats. I do a lot of running and hitting.

Well do them until you are 14 or 15. You will have a decent strength base built up, which will make lifting weights so much easier.

I still do bodyweight squats to work on barbell squat form.

There is no reason to wait to train with weights.

This is a myth that needs to be dispelled ASAP.

Workout three times a week.
Squat 3x5 every workout day
Bench 3x5 every other workout day
OH Press 3x5 every other workout day
Deadlift 1x5 every other workout day
Power Clean 5x3 every other workout day (alternated these with Pendlay Rows)

Basically alternate the Bench and OH Press. Alternate the Deadlift and Power Clean. So workout days look like:

Squat
Bench
Deadlift

Squat
Press
Power Clean[/quote]

This is extremely similar to what the pitching staff at my school is supposed to be doing!

I put on 30 pounds from squating 3 times a week. It was ridic.

There is no reason to wait to train with weights.

This is a myth that needs to be dispelled ASAP.[/quote]

Lon Kilgore has a serious bias in his work since he himself was a body builder. That study is pretty vague and doesn’t go into the consequences that happen later in life due to certain lifts.

also his emphasis is on doing the lifts with meticulous form. What are the chances a 12 year old is going to have perfect form when some collegiate athletes don’t even have good form.

I just can’t agree with the guy on that one. And just cos he has a PHD slapped on the end of his name doesn’t mean anything because if that were the case we would all be throwing like Mike Marshall and baseball would be ruined!!

[quote=“UndersizedRHP”]Lon Kilgore has a serious bias in his work since he himself was a body builder. That study is pretty vague and doesn’t go into the consequences that happen later in life due to certain lifts.

also his emphasis is on doing the lifts with meticulous form. What are the chances a 12 year old is going to have perfect form when some collegiate athletes don’t even have good form.

I just can’t agree with the guy on that one. And just cos he has a PHD slapped on the end of his name doesn’t mean anything because if that were the case we would all be throwing like Mike Marshall and baseball would be ruined!![/quote]

Lon Kilgore being a bodybuilder has nothing to do with his research. In fact, his program is VERY bad for bodybuilders and very good for people training for strength. They are diametrically opposed. Mark Rippetoe is his colleague, who was never a bodybuilder, and trained for strength as a powerlifter.

Additionally, I’m not sure that Dr. Lon Kilgore was a bodybuilder. Everything I’ve read shows that he was an Olympic-style weightlifter that he initially took up to become a better wrestler.

Good form can be taught very simply by coaches. It’s not hard. And remember, “Perfect is the enemy of good.” You don’t need to have perfect form - just one devoid of serious problems. And that’s not hard to attain at all. Do you not throw a baseball because perfect mechanics are hard to get? Without perfect mechanics, you risk injuring your arm - so do you not pitch? Of course not!

Lastly, the fact that Dr. Kilgore is a Ph. D. in Exercise Science does not make him equivalent to Dr. Marshall. Dr. Kilgore continues his education, publishes peer-reviewed research, and trains athletes at the OLYMPIC level. Dr. Marshall does none of this. This is no different than comparing Dr. Glenn Fleisig and Dr. Mike Marshall, and it’s wrong.

(BTW, I hope you know that the exercise program above that you thought was good was made in part by Dr. Lon Kilgore.)

He didn’t invent the exercises in that workout. And it is different teaching form to a Division I athlete and a 12 year old kid.

A 12 year old kid is more likely to damage his growth plates than a kid who has some secondary education. That can’t be argued.

You can find one or two twelve year olds in online videos who show good form and i’ll find you 20 others who have no clue what they are doing because they are too young.

I’m not trying to argue that the guys a loony because he is obviously smart but its one of those situations where he is promoting this idea so he can make a buck off of his book.

Realistically 12 year old boys arent going to worry about form and technique they are going to worry about putting as much weight as they can on the racks and THAT IS dangerous. And scientifically proven.

Well, I wouldn’t like to lift that much weight.

as a 12 year old, I would suggest copious amounts of bodyweight exercises.

also, it’s not too late to begin some gymnastics type training. The kind of strength those guys develop is beyond insane…and I havent ever heard of someone bashing gymnastics training because it will “stunt growth” or anything ridiculous like that.