My son


#1

My son needs to develop back leg drive to get down the mound. Any advice on drills or correction? Having trouble uploading a video now but will upload a picture.


#2

The bottom picture isn’t him but the pic on the left is what we are trying to accomplish.


#4

Hey Suzuki160,

There are many drills you can use to help your son gain early momentum moving down the mound. But as with all drills, if not performed correctly, they can instill bad habits causing bad mechanics. What do I mean by this? One of the drills I do like is the net drill. For this pitching drill you don’t necessarily need a net if you do not have one. You can also use a wall. The idea is to have something behind the pitcher that will let the pitcher know if he has broken his hands too early or is not gaining enough ground going forward.

This is a great pitching drill if done correctly. But, I have seen many young pitchers push off of the back leg so hard to try and move further away from the wall or net that they create new flaws in their pitching deliveries.

Before doing amy type of drill you have to understand the importance of proper mechanics starting with the back foot. This is where it all begins. If his entire back foot is not anchored to the ground and he lifts it up or pushes all of his weight to the instep, he becomes a quad pitcher. This is what we want to stay away from. Quad pitchers will never be able to correctly use ground force, load his hip, get his shin vertical, stay closed, and sit into his delivery.

Drills are great just as long as you understand the movements prior to what you want to work on. Video the drills and watch closely. If you are not sure about a movement, just ask.

Steve


#5

I would like to see a higher leg lift and slightly more turn (left back pocket pointed towards home plate). This may help with more explosive movement down the mound.


#6

Appreciate the comments and idea - will check back with our progress


#7

His right arm position seems a little awkward with it being parallel to the ground. Can’t see the hand break but it seems like his hand break is early so he may not have a lot of time for leg drive. These two could be related.

I think the other two things to look at are the leg lift and glove arm. The leg lift looks abbreviated…again…hard to completely tell from the back. The glove arm is really not helping him generate power. Its is just falling away. The glove arm is leaking a ton of power out of the delivery.


#8

It seems to me that if the boy is so comfortable and he is good at playing, why should he correct something? Let him do what he wants
https://www.letstalkpitching.com/uploads/db4140/original/2X/0/0b10a52d0717fb1bdbc79c0d7efda7eb6a9c7cd3.jpeg


#9

because poor mechanics can develop problems down the line. just because he’s comfortable now doesn’t mean that he’ll be comfortable in the future when he needs to start progressing


#10

I agree Judge. My son is also a self driven kid who has a strong desire to be the best he can be.


#11

that’s great to hear. small changes at a time until it becomes muscle memory and then make another small change. too many changes at once will throw him off and can cause injury. you can start with something small like having him relax his foot/ankle. i notice his toes are pointing up but they should be relaxed and pointed down as shown in the other picture.