My son needs help with mechanics


#1

My son is 13 and seems to throw with his arm at a half side arm little to no velocity throws around 63mph he is big for his age 5’11" 190. I am thinking of purchasing the thromax to get him to throw at a better angle. Does anyone know of any product or drills that can help with this? Are there any pitching/fudementals camps that he can attend location not a concern.

Thanks in advance

Mark


#2

I don’t know where you live, but this time of year it’s pretty lean for camps. Contacting the NPA web site can let you know of certified Tom House Pitching coaches in your area, I’d also make two other suggestions, call his middle school coach or the high school coach, they generally know of reputable pitching coaches nearby, if that fails contact whatever college is located near you and ask their pitching coach. I would save my money and don’t buy gimmicks, chances are they’ll just collect dust after a few uses. If you are altering his motion you should have someone who knows look at him and work with him. In early summer, many colleges have week long camps, they vary in how good/bad they are depending on the coach of the school (Some just use the camps as funding for their own trips…so caveat emptor for sure). My son has attended many at the University of North Florida and A) Had a great time and B) Helped his entire approach to pitching. So it can be a good thing.
Good Luck


#3

I’d recommend searching around your location for a good pitching instructor rather than a camp. Camps can help but they are a short term thing, some get a lot out of camps other don’t, depends on the kid, depends on the camp.

A good pitching instructor will pay dividends for a long time, however it will take some research on your part. You have to find somebody whose pitching/throwing philosophies you are comfortable with and who your son can work well with.

While the lack of velocity relative to his size is a concern it may not be all due to mechanics, sometimes kids who grow early don’t have the coordination or timing that they’ll have once they get used to their new body again and the result is less velocity than one might expect for a while.


#4

I think the Thromax is a waste of money.

Does he pull his glove into the chest or does it fly out to the side?

Do you have a video of your son throwing?


#5

Where in the USA do you live? Let us know and maybe someone can make a recommendation for a camp and/or instructor.

I’d suggest you try to find an instructor before buying any training aids. Most training aids are like a sailboat — it may be the ideal way to get you where you want to go, but you won’t know how to work the sails correctly until you get some one-on-one, hands-on training from an expert first.


#6

I dont like the npa at all and im a student of Dick Mills and you can say ahything about him but he has helped me under stand the game more then anything. Tom house also thought that Mark Prior had perfect mechaincs shows how smart he is.
www.pitching.com


#7

What do you know about the NPA? Maybe instead of being a blind follower of Mills you should try to learn about different ideas from different people.


#8

i was just on there web site and it was funny. Towel drill lol teach the body not to throw the ball. The body throws not the arm power. Lead with hit while picking leg up you will not find that in MLB.


#9

RI, how many times do you tell everyone to lead with their hips?!?

NPA is saying the same thing as you! And they’re saying the same thing as Nyman, and Mills, and O’Leary, and every other pitching guru who is trying to make a buck.


#10

they lift the leg at the same time they lead with it.


#11

who does?


#12

The tom house program teaches to lift and lead with the hip at the same time.


#13

Right, and when many mlb pitchers lift their leg their hip moves forward as well.

Look at Ryan and Johnson in the video section. As their leg is moving up, their hips have already started moving forward.


#14

Yep, and generally for the same price of a camp where one on one instruction is limited and so is the experience and expertise of the instructors (many are high school or college guys with lots of playing experience but no teaching or coaching experience), a pitching coach will work with your son in a one on one or two on one lesson environment several times (usually monthly is recommended) over a period of time, giving both the coach and the player an opportunity to learn their pitching motion and improve mechanics over time, rather than a see it and forget it scenario like a camp.

Camps, because they last 3 or 4 days in a row and throw an immense amount of info at your player, require the player to absorb a lot and practice on his own, without any input as to how much they may be improving, or whether they are doing the drills or exercises properly. They are also generally very general in approach. I have seen camps where the majority of the kids are with one of the younger coaches working on basics while the one or two “studs” of the camp work with the head coach - i.e., the guy who knows what he’s doing.

A good pitching coach can work with your son to identify strengths and weaknesses, and to determine the best methods to improve. I’ve done both, and if I had it to do over again I would forget the camps and dump my baseball money into private lessons. More bang for the buck.