My pitching mechanics


#1

newest video from about 3 months ago


#2

Tanner. That just doesn’t look like the mechanics I’ve come to know from you.


#3

[quote=“dm59”]Tanner. That just doesn’t look like the mechanics I’ve come to know from you.[/quote]better or worse?


#4

Worse. The back leg doesn’t play as much of a positive role as it used to or should/could. I do see that you’ve taken to heart all of the talk about stopping the head from leaning back. The result is, in just my own opinion, not an improvement. It has dropped your arm slot considerably, which is a natural effect of staying so upright. I’m not a big fan of the upright posture idea. Now, that doesn’t mean that one should lean over to an extreme either. I did think that your leaning back was extreme and needed to be toned down but now things have gone too far the other way.

This must be incredibly frustrating for you. A lot of people (including me) are saying that you have to not lean back so much but when you try to stop that I come along and say you’re too upright now.

I’m with Paul Nyman in that there’s nothing wrong with a slight lean as you rotate the shoulders. That’s how you get a higher arm slot. I think that trying to have this upright posture that Tom House seems to recommend can result in a stiff set of mechanics with a low to sidearm arm slot.

I think you should go back to what you used to do but keep the head from flipping back. Don’t worry so much about staying so upright with the torso.

Sorry Roger. I’ve just never liked the upright posture idea. There are just too many pros who have a tilt to the shoulders coming through to say that you MUST stay upright. Actually, I can’t find any pro videos where this upright posture is maintained.

Now, the possibility exists that House doesn’t really mean that the posture is this upright. Maybe I don’t understand the recommendation well enough.


#5

[quote=“dm59”]Worse. The back leg doesn’t play as much of a positive role as it used to or should/could. I do see that you’ve taken to heart all of the talk about stopping the head from leaning back. The result is, in just my own opinion, not an improvement. It has dropped your arm slot considerably, which is a natural effect of staying so upright. I’m not a big fan of the upright posture idea. Now, that doesn’t mean that one should lean over to an extreme either. I did think that your leaning back was extreme and needed to be toned down but now things have gone too far the other way.

This must be incredibly frustrating for you. A lot of people (including me) are saying that you have to not lean back so much but when you try to stop that I come along and say you’re too upright now.

I’m with Paul Nyman in that there’s nothing wrong with a slight lean as you rotate the shoulders. That’s how you get a higher arm slot. I think that trying to have this upright posture that Tom House seems to recommend can result in a stiff set of mechanics with a low to sidearm arm slot.

I think you should go back to what you used to do but keep the head from flipping back. Don’t worry so much about staying so upright with the torso.

Sorry Roger. I’ve just never liked the upright posture idea. There are just too many pros who have a tilt to the shoulders coming through to say that you MUST stay upright. Actually, I can’t find any pro videos where this upright posture is maintained.

Now, the possibility exists that House doesn’t really mean that the posture is this upright. Maybe I don’t understand the recommendation well enough.[/quote]i am doing a workout tommorow, ill try focus more on what i was doing before this…


#6

Remember, this is only one person’s opinion. Others may disagree. That’s the problem with on-line forums. You’ll get all kinds of differing advice and you then are on your own as to what you take away and implement.

My advice: Work on that back leg, momentum sideways and not lifting your chin up and tilting the head back. Don’t stress out about a small lean with the shoulders.


#7

Tanner who works with you besides the folks on this site?


#8

[quote=“jdfromfla”]Tanner who works with you besides the folks on this site?[/quote]my dad, and thats basically it


#9

Go ahead and disagree all you like. You’re still wrong.

Just kidding! :mrgreen:

Actually, I think House focuses more on the head and spine and not so much the shoulders. There was a picture of Maddux where his shoulders are tilted while his head is still upright. That’s probably a good representation.

What’s interesting is I don’t think I’ve been one of the bigger influencers of Tanner on this site (though I wouldn’t doubt if I commented on the back lean issue).


#10

Wrong!?! I’ve been called worse than that!!! :lol:


#11

I think you look better … the head is a big improvement, and I wouldn’t be surprised if your control is better not that you don’t lean back. You look more balanced in this clip than you’ve previously looked.

DM59, if you’re not a fan of the upright posture, does that mean you advocate leaning forward slightly or arching back slightly?

I’m not seeing how he’s “gone to far the other way” … you mean he’s leaning forward now? … it’s not like he’s in Jeff Weaver territory.

Plus, if his arm slot has dropped, we don’t really know if that’s a bad thing. Maybe Tanner would be better served with a lower arm slot. We don’t know that, do we?


#12

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]You look more balanced in this clip than you’ve previously looked. [/quote] I disagree completely. In one of the throws, his right foot actually comes off the mound, to the side.

Because he’s trying to stay so upright, excessively so, he gets very little forward trunk flexion and the back knee comes forward into release, which is something very few pros do.

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]DM59, if you’re not a fan of the upright posture, does that mean you advocate leaning forward slightly or arching back slightly?[/quote]That isn’t where I was going but those things are sometimes advocated by some (bow-arch-bow a la SETPRO).

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]I’m not seeing how he’s “gone to far the other way” … you mean he’s leaning forward now?[/quote]No. I didn’t say that at all. I’m saying that, because he’s trying to keep everything so upright, he’s become to mechanical and stiff.

This upright posture thing has to be a timing issue. When and how long do you remain upright with the spine? An NPA article says the following:

My question, again, is when and for how long?

What I see in most MLB pitchers is the spine and head staying upright as shoulder rotation begins and the trunk “tracks” forward but it smoothly leans to the glove side as everything progresses. This is variable, of course, from pitcher to pitcher depending on their own personal preferences and arm slots. A guy with a very high arm slot will have much more lean than those with lower arm slots.

I’m not advocating leaning to the glove side immediately upon the start of shoulder rotation but I’m also not going to say that leaning is necessarily bad. Tanner’s lean was excessive and my real issue was that he tilted his head that way so much.

Roger was correct when he mentioned guys like Maddux who have the shoulder lean as the arm comes through but the head is somewhat upright. The eyes are very close to level, which I suggest is a good thing for orientation and perception of the target.

I still maintain that Tanner’s mechanics were very, very good with only a few things to work on for further improvement. Those would be the back leg and sideways momentum along with the head issue. If he were to focus on not lifting the chin and bringing the head back like he does, I believe he will benefit in consistency.


#13

Tanner I’d suggest you reshoot that video from a regular mound. You looked a little unsure up on that portable. It looked a little steep from the camera angle.

I think I remember a video you did from the mound and thought you looked pretty confident and solid.

Find a pitching coach to give you “hands on” instruction and another perspective in addition to you dad.


#14

I’m interested in your point about the back knee coming forward into release. It seems like he does that in his older clip too.

You attribute it to his limited “trunk flexion”

The “trunk” of the body refers to what? From below the arm pits to the hips, right?


#15

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]I’m interested in your point about the back knee coming forward into release. It seems like he does that in his older clip too.[/quote]I’ve seen several clips of Tanner over the past year. Early on, this was an issue that I raised. He worked on it and made some good progress, if anyone agrees that this is even a good idea. I do not agree with the oft stated philosophy that pulling the back knee forward and inward results in better hip rotation.

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]You attribute it to his limited “trunk flexion”[/quote] Not quite. Actually, I said “Because he’s trying to stay so upright, excessively so, he gets very little forward trunk flexion…”

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]The “trunk” of the body refers to what? From below the arm pits to the hips, right?[/quote] I’m considering the shoulders as part of the trunk/torso. I’m not sure why we would exclude the shoulders.


#16

I think Tanner lacks momentum. At one point during his stride, he is leaning sideways towards 2B (sideways because he’s closed off and facing 3B at that point) as if he’s trying to “stay back” and it really looks like he is reaching with the front foot. His release point gets no further than his front foot when it should be out in front of his front foot.

Tanner’s hips don’t start forward until at or after the apex of the knee lift. I say the hips need to start forward sooner. This may also take care of any “upright” look.


#17

[quote=“Roger”]I think Tanner lacks momentum. At one point during his stride, he is leaning sideways towards 2B (sideways because he’s closed off and facing 3B at that point) as if he’s trying to “stay back” and it really looks like he is reaching with the front foot. His release point gets no further than his front foot when it should be out in front of his front foot.

Tanner’s hips don’t start forward until at or after the apex of the knee lift. I say the hips need to start forward sooner. This may also take care of any “upright” look.[/quote]thats something i have been working on, is getting my hips going sooner, the portable mound is the height of a regular mound


#18

This is something that Tom House is wrong about.

I have looked at a lot of photos of this moment, and in virtually every case the release point is in line with the front foot.


#19

[quote=“dm59”]I’m with Paul Nyman in that there’s nothing wrong with a slight lean as you rotate the shoulders. That’s how you get a higher arm slot. I think that trying to have this upright posture that Tom House seems to recommend can result in a stiff set of mechanics with a low to sidearm arm slot.

I think you should go back to what you used to do but keep the head from flipping back. Don’t worry so much about staying so upright with the torso.

Sorry Roger. I’ve just never liked the upright posture idea. There are just too many pros who have a tilt to the shoulders coming through to say that you MUST stay upright. Actually, I can’t find any pro videos where this upright posture is maintained.[/quote]

I agree.

I think a moderate shoulder tilt is a good way to raise the release point without causing too much head movement.


#20

[quote=“Tanner Lorenz”]newest video from about 3 months ago

Tanner,

Send me the clip and I’ll go through it frame by frame.

The biggest thing that I saw was a little too much reverse rotation of the shoulders. I prefer that you take the ball more back toward 2B.