My Mechanics


#1

Hi im 14 years old and just finshed a video of my pitching.
I have had an elbow problem in the past so i might have a mechanical problem

and

any comments and help would be great

thanks


#2

something to do with your stride doesnt seem right. i donno what


#3

Ok I see alot of problems here

1st problem-you are to slow in your delivery, you want to explode through the balance point

2nd problem- you short arm the ball to much you want to long arm more

3rd problem- your stride is very short work on getting your stride to 100%of your height

4th Problem- you need to gain better leg strength because you can’t stop your self from drifting forward. If you lengthen the stride that might take care of the drift frowards.

5th problem- your elbow is to high and is not at shoulder height but a little above. This could lead to shoulder/elbow problems in the future.

You aren’t as high as adam wainwright but you are still way to high
http://www.chrisoleary.com/projects/Baseball/Pitching/ThePitchingMechanic/Images/AdamWainwright_2006_002.jpg

TRY TO BE LIKE GREG MADDUXS

                                                                                               http://www.chrisoleary.com/projects/Baseball/Pitching/Images/Examples/Example_Pitcher_GregMaddux_010.jpg

#4

1st problem-you are to slow in your delivery, you want to explode through the balance point - if i explode through would it increase velocity because i pitch slower than most at my age and height mid 60’s at 14, 5-8

2nd problem- you short arm the ball to much you want to long arm more - kinda of confused on that one

3rd problem- your stride is very short work on getting your stride to 100%of your height - i agree im trying to work on that and its probably hard to see but sometimes i throw across my body so i have stride problems

4th Problem- you need to gain better leg strength because you can’t stop your self from drifting forward. If you lengthen the stride that might take care of the drift frowards. - ya i deffently need to put on muscle im like 130 and 5-8

5th problem- your elbow is to high and is not at shoulder height but a little above. This could lead to shoulder/elbow problems in the future. - so you want your elbow level with your shoulder or a little above, I always thought as high as possiable relisticly speking

Thank you for all your help ill get to work.


#5

Both the arm action and glove action look very forced and mechanical. Try to smooth it out a bit. I wouldn’t exactly call it short arming though.

I think a percentage of stride length as a checkpoint is overrated.


#6

The goal is 100% but 95% and up is good.

Palo20 the reason he looks mechaincal is he isn’t exploding through the balance point. Also he is a pitcher that is “slow and smooth and mechaincal” instead of explosive like a tim lincecum or a roy oswalt.


#7

You want to think"fly through the balance point" and you will gain velocity.
There is no balance point so don’t pause or hesitate at all.

Short arming the ball means your arm gets up before the body is ready to throw it. Try to long arm the ball so the arm circle isn’t as big

If you are throwing across the body then think take a small step back and explode through the catcher.
Y
ou want your elbow even or below not above the shoulder thats were you will get injured.

Easy thinking
Take a small step back
Don’t think hit balance point and instead think fly through the balance point and your velocity will go up.


#8

I don’t think a specific stride length correlates to velocity, particularly not a percentage like 95 or 100% of height. Those are arbitrary numbers. Once again as Mills would say, for something to be truth, it has to be truth every time. If a guy has a stride length of 75% of his height and he increases it to 100%, it doesn’t necessarily mean that his actual velocity will increase.


#9

YES his velocity would change because he is building more elastic energy which then if transfrod right it would increase velocity. Look at Mike Mussina his stride is around 75% now and he is throwing alot slowwer when he had his more explosive long stride mechanics.


#10

if roy oswalt and tim lincecum stride was not 100% do you think they could both throw upper 90’s at there sizes?


#11

Yes, they are two specific cases of small guys who use their entire body very well to throw hard, but once again, if it works for one it has to work for everyone. Randy Johnson is a short strider and always has been. Would he be throwing 105 back in the day if he lengthened his stride?


#12

randy johnson doesn’t have a short stride really it’s pretty much between 95% and 100%.


#13

I don’t think Randy Johnson strides close to 6’10." 100% is an extremely far stride and guys that stride that far are usually shorter guys. So once again, all of these big leaguers that don’t stride 100% of their height, will they automatically gain velocity by increasing their stride?


#14

Thank you for the help
When you said short arming it… Well when i was on Chris O’leary website i saw short arming - under throwing too high. And i tend to throw high the best couple starts, so it must be. I have another video its proabably the best one here it is.


#15

Bostonsportlova,

I think you need to modify your stride leg’s motion. From the top of your knee lift, you immediately open up your front leg. Your stride foot goes out and then down with a rather harsh landing. I think this contributes to the mechanical look others have described as well as the appearance of “short-arming”. It also opens up the lower half too soon and it appears (in the second video) to cause you to plant your stride foot pointing a bit toward the 1B side.

I believe the adjustment you need to make is to lead with your front hip longer into your stride and then take the front foot down and out instead of out and down. In the second video, it appears you get your hips started toward home plate early enough. But you might be able to get them going a bit faster.

Also make sure you don’t pause at the top of the knee lift. It looks like you do this in the first video but not in the second video. Get those hips going.


#16

Moving faster isn’t a guarantee of anything. A certain stride length isn’t either. It just ain’t that easy. If it were, everyone would be doing it already. The pitcher needs the functional strength and flexibility to perform the mechanics properly and with proper timing while moving faster.


#17

Ahhh the mysteries of life.

Yes

Thanks to long stride, yeah. And it’s not ‘specific cases’… it always is the case.

Wrong. If Tim Lincecum STILL had that long stride without that kind of body speed, he wouldn’t be throwing that hard. Think about a big, jello-like rubber attached to a car. If a car goes faster, the rubber with move faster, but what if the car goes slower? The rubber won’t move fast as as it did. Seriously, this is a common sense

I know there’s long toss argument… but this is really ridiculous of posters thinking stride length doesn’t effect velocity. It’s like thinking pitcher’s body is big rubber band and if you stretch that rubber band longer, more energie it will make.

Basically it’s more elastic/kinetic energy that you make by long stride. I don’t see this very hard to understand and I’m 16 yrs old

Some examples of long-stride hard throwers

Dice-K

Koufax
http://quietfm.com/Blog/Images/koufax01.jpg

Nolan Ryan

Tim Lincecum

and to Roger and palo, no offense, but I think you guys don’t know how the body helps the arm speed


#18

Ha, no offense taken here, I know full well how the body works to throw the ball.

I have no problem with a long stride, I actually encourage it within reason. Like I said before though, putting a percentage on it is stupid, everyone is DIFFERENT. Some guys may actually throw harder with a short stride, yes it’s very possible. It’s just not as simple as making a guy stride longer and boom, there’s more velocity. As Roger pointed out, it also takes a certain amount of flexibility and functional strength.

Once again using the argument that for something to be fact, it has to be fact EVERY single time, then I’ve lengthed my stride before and not thrown harder. I’ve seen the same for other people as well.

Long strides have huge benefits, but the correlation to velocity is not as simple and linear as we’re trying to make it.


#19

Hey, thanks for your kind words. But interesting… how is that possible?


#20

It’s possible because changing something like stride length may throw off the timing of the kinetic chain. Also, I’ve seen guys who have shorts strides and they have ridiculously quick arms. If they had longer strides their arm may have to wait and slow down a bit in order to compensate for that longer stride. Tough to explain without video.

How else is it possible? Throw a pitch, then lengthen your stride another 6 inches or so. See if the velocity increases. If it does, then stride even farther. Check it again. There is simply no guarantee that velocity will increase every time.