My Mechanics


#1

Hey, sorry I havent been around for a while. I 've been real buzy and Im just starting to pitch again after recovering from my injury. I had a piched nerve in my neck which made it painful to throw, but Im back and looking for some help with my mechainics.
http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=6262154649508974087&hl=en-CA

http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=798671257421855935&hl=en-CA

http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=-1501805509808168316&hl=en-CA
http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=6633737150301002418&hl=en-CA

http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=-1346829657283082662&hl=en-CA

Thanks, and If anyone want to take a better look I have them in MOV.


#2

Looks pretty good to me.

Two things to look for: Your right foot comes up early. A little drag of the right toe can help prevent over rotation which is shown by your finishing off balance to the 1st base side. On the other hand, many pitchers have little or no toe drag and still get the job done.

Second, you can probably increase your shoulder/hip separation.

Nothing major in my opinion.

One question. When you miss, where do you miss? To the PA side?


#3

Overall, looks pretty good. I don’t see any major problems. But I did notice the following:

(1) It looks like you stride to the closed side. You also lean to the glove side at release. I believe these are related. Specifically, I feel the posture change is an attempt to get the upper body back in line with the target after having strided to the closed side. You can minimize the posture change by starting on the left side of the rubber. Otherwise, you need to change the direction of your stride. One way to do that is to get your hips going sooner to commit your weight in the direction of the target.

(2) You have a rather wide stance when you pitch from the stretch. This makes you slower to the plate because your first motion is a sizeable weight shift onto the back leg. In other words, you go back before you go forward. This may slow down your move to 1B too.


#4

[quote=“hoseman18”]Looks pretty good to me.

Two things to look for: Your right foot comes up early. A little drag of the right toe can help prevent over rotation which is shown by your finishing off balance to the 1st base side. On the other hand, many pitchers have little or no toe drag and still get the job done.

Second, you can probably increase your shoulder/hip separation.

Nothing major in my opinion.

One question. When you miss, where do you miss? To the PA side?[/quote]
I usually miss high to the PA side


#5

[quote=“Roger”]Overall, looks pretty good. I don’t see any major problems. But I did notice the following:

(1) It looks like you stride to the closed side. You also lean to the glove side at release. I believe these are related. Specifically, I feel the posture change is an attempt to get the upper body back in line with the target after having strided to the closed side. You can minimize the posture change by starting on the left side of the rubber. Otherwise, you need to change the direction of your stride. One way to do that is to get your hips going sooner to commit your weight in the direction of the
target.

(2) You have a rather wide stance when you pitch from the stretch. This makes you slower to the plate because your first motion is a sizeable weight shift onto the back leg. In other words, you go back before you go forward. This may slow down your move to 1B too.[/quote]

So I should stride more towards the left handers batting box?
and about the wide stance from the strech it acually helps my time to the plate by reducing my leg kick. A couple of times this year runners acually stopped running and went back towards first because they had such a bad jump, then we’d just get them out eventually in a hot box.

Where in the motion is my posture change?

 Thanks for the replies

#6

No. Stride toward the target. In the rear view video you posted, I compared the position of the pivot foot when it planted along side the rubber to the position of the stride foot when it planted. The camera angle is not directly behind so it’s a little difficult to tell. But it looked to me like you strided toward the right handers box.

Could you not use the reduced leg kick AND just move forward toward the plate? I can guarantee you that base runners will be off to the races as soon as they see the weight shift back. Anything you do prior to moving toward the plate just gives time to the base runner.

It’s most noticeable after release but I feel it starts as soon as your front foot plants. Certainly at release your upper half appears to be leaning to the glove side.


#7

Ok Roger thanks.

any more suggestions? DM, Chris what do you think of my mechanics?


#8

khut
I’d like to see them in mov format. That way I can step through them frame by frame in Quicktime. Can you send one side and one back to: dm-59@hotmail.com?

I’m with hoseman18 about the back foot coming up early. Related to this is how your back leg/knee never really fully rotates under as much as it could. My suggestion is to focus on really rotating it all back there, along with good, aggressive hip rotation. The back foot must turn over and will drag on its own after all of this rotation.

The landing on the closed side of the target line, I believe, is related to not rotating the hips into landing enough. Because of this, I think your hips are depositing the front foot too soon.

You are rotating, I think, your hips and shoulders roughly simultaneously. Get the hips rotating prior to landing while the throwing arm is still on its way up toward high cocked.

Send the files though. It really helps to stop frame them.


#9

hey to me it looks like your a decent height so it seems like you could get a better angle on the ball, try to get on top of the ball more