My Mechanics


#1

I finally got a video posted and was hoping the members of this board could give me some help with my mechanics.
If anyone would like a copy to use in quicktime player send me a PM

http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=-6237732650012243117&hl=en-CA

http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=5873848703958422207&hl=en-CA

http://video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=7676618311980000064&hl=en-CA
Thanks


#2

sorry about the links, I think I fixed it now


#3

A couple of things.

  1. You really have to stop the extreme bend in the elbow during the lift phase on the way back. As the ball comes up, keep about a 90 deg. bend in it. Don’t tuck it in so much. Think of it as scribing an arc upward and pointing toward 3rd base more. Relax it.

  2. You have virtually no hip/shoulder separation.

  3. Your shoulders open far too early, which is causing #2 above. This is resulting in your arm doing all of the work, although I like the explosiveness of the arm action.

  4. Rather than pulling that back knee forward, I’d like to see you keep the sole of the back going upward and pointing at the sky, as a result of a full hip turn.


#4

I agree.

I REALLY don’t like your Pitching Arm Side arm action. It looks very Mark Prior to me, and that’s not a good thing.

I think the problem starts with where (up high) and how (elbows high and palms down) you break your hands and continues through the point where your PAS forearm hangs down vertically from your upper arm. I wouldn’t be surprised if you were coached to do this, but I think this is very bad advice.

Finally, I also don’t see much in the way of hip/shoulder separation.

The bottom line is that you look like someone who is trying to get more velocity, but is focused too much on arm action (e.g. throwing with your arm) and not enough on throwing with your body.


#5

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]The bottom line is that you look like someone who is trying to get more velocity, but is focused too much on arm action (e.g. throwing with your arm) and not enough on throwing with your body.[/quote]Couldn’t have said it better myself.


#6

[quote

I think the problem starts with where (up high) and how (elbows high and palms down) you break your hands and continues through the point where your PAS forearm hangs down vertically from your upper arm. I wouldn’t be surprised if you were coached to do this, but I think this is very bad advice.

quote]

how should I fix this, do you think if I just lower my hands when they break the problem will be solved? and will it improve velocity or reduce the risk of injury. By the way the only pitching instruction Ive had is from this and other websites, and could you please explain what PAS is.
Thanks


#7

[quote=“khut”][quote

I think the problem starts with where (up high) and how (elbows high and palms down) you break your hands and continues through the point where your PAS forearm hangs down vertically from your upper arm. I wouldn’t be surprised if you were coached to do this, but I think this is very bad advice.

quote]

how should I fix this, do you think if I just lower my hands when they break the problem will be solved? and will it improve velocity or reduce the risk of injury. By the way the only pitching instruction Ive had is from this and other websites, and could you please explain what PAS is.
Thanks[/quote]

PAS = Pitching Arm Side

I would start with breaking your hands lower. At your belt buckle.


#8

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]
I would start with breaking your hands lower. At your belt buckle.[/quote]

Hi Chris. I really break my hands up high, at about chest high. And my glove-side arm don’t “go down” and then forward, instead it goes directly forward.
Why is breaking the hands up high a problem? What should it cause? Loss of control? Loss of velocity? Increase injury risk?
Also, doing that, what I do with the Glove-Side arm, is there a problem?


#9

[quote=“KreGg”]Why is breaking the hands up high a problem? What should it cause? Loss of control? Loss of velocity? Increase injury risk?
Also, doing that, what I do with the Glove-Side arm, is there a problem?[/quote]

I have read studies that say that a longer arm swing, which is what you get if you break your hands low, reduces the risk of both elbow and shoulder problems.

With respect to your glove-side arm, it looks to me like you start pulling your glove into your chest a little early (e.g. before your glove-side foot plants). This could be why your shoulders start rotating prematurely.

I would suggest that you try to keep the glove arm extended a little longer because this will give your hips more time to open up and let you throw more with your body and less with your arm.


#10

Chris.
How many pros actually point their glove at or near the target? I can’t find them.

If anyone is going to follow this advice, they should be very aware of the “potential” down side. That relatively heavy glove, out at the end of a straightened out arm (lever), wants to drop and take the shoulder with it.

When are they to point the glove and at what?


#11

The idea isn’t to point the glove directly at the target, because that will cause you to drop the front shoulder (ala JHuskey, Billy Wagner, and others).

However, I think that pointing the glove to the pitching arm side of the plate can help a young pitcher learn to keep their shoulders closed.

I agree that this is a potential risk, but am not sure that it’s much more than just that. Here’s a photo of Jered Weaver. His shoulders are reverse-rotated in this photo, so he’s pointing to the 3B side of Home.

Here’s a photo of Aaron Cook doing a similar thing…


#12

Bingo! There are two aspects to the equal and opposite arms thing - balance and timing. Now I’m not saying anything about pointing the glove any which way. But getting the glove out front and leaving it there gives you the timing you need to get good hip and shoulder separation AND delayed shoulder rotation. And, as Chris says, these things help you use the body to throw with instead of just the arm.


#13

This “pointing” is really just a moment in time. Again, the stills just don’t show what’s really happening. VIDEO VIDEO. This position you showed happens for an INSTANT!!! This pitching thing is a dynamic activity.

When do you point it and for how long? Show me all of the pros who are doing this and don’t show me yet another still image for proof because I think I’ll just tear my hair out.

Here’s a list of MLB pitchers I checked VIDEO of on this issue and NONE of them “point” the glove. Even the ones who have the lead arm straightened out at some point “sweep” it rather than “point” it.

Clemens, Jimmy Key, Beckett, Verlander, Brown, Rivera, Nolan Ryan, Pedro, Prior, Randy Johnson, Oswalt, Schilling, Kazmir, Smoltz, Wagner, Reyes, Zito, Radke, Sabbathia, Benson, Colon, Schmidt, Santana, Sosa, Kinney, Wood, Lohse, Koufax, Palmer, Hawkins, Gibson, Seaver, Tim Hudson.

So, tell me, if these guys don’t do what you are recommending as being so necessary in the people on this board you are advising, why should anyone? Why? All of this “theory”, supported by still images, isn’t supported by the pros.