My Future


#1

Hey guys, I have a question. I am wondering how fast do you need to throw to play college ball then go on to the minor leagues. I know everyone says it’s now about how fast you throw, just say it is for now

I’m a 14 year old freshman in HighSchool and tryouts just finished and I was clocked at 79MPH consistent and accurate. (Made the JV team) I was wondering what you think I can hit by senior year. I’m planning on going to a D2 school if I can make it, then play class A if It’s possible.

If you have an idea on how fast the average college & minor league pitcher throw in Class A, AA and AAA that would be helpful, thanks!


#2

Velocity varies at the college level. Majority of D1 pitchers will be in the 85 to 90 range on average, and even faster. Some will be slower. It all just depends on what arm you throw with, your stuff (curve, slider, etc), your size, and projection to get better. D2 school pitchers throw between 82 and 88 on average, but once again they got the 90 guys as well. I play for an NAIA team, and the velocity varies greatly from game to game. We see kids who throw 90, and then kids who can barely touch 80. It depends the program you go too as well. I’m a freshmen at the NAIA level and I throw 85-87 range. D3 is much like the NAIA, lots of mixed velocities. 80 to 86 on average for D3 ball. The minor league pitchers no matter what class they play in can bring it. Many minor league pitchers can bring it 90+ mph.
Since you are already throwing 79 mph, I would assume you would be able to throw at least mid 80’s by senior year. Your velocity will depend on your genetics, muscle development and so on. I can’t truly predict your velocity, but if you work hard enough you should be pumping gas :slight_smile:


#3

Velo will get you in the door but if you can’t pitch you wont last long. Just keep working and dont worry about 4 years down the road just the day ahead.


#4

My son is in the same situation. My advice for him is to focus developing his game and keeping his academics strong, and to keep his eyes set on who he will be and what he brings to the table when he’s a Junior. If he wants to be throwing mid-80’s or 90’s when he’s 16 (i.e. a Junior), then there are certain things he needs to do and work on, including listening to his coaches and being teachable, scheduled bullpen sessions, adding strength and commanding the mental part of the game. If he does what he needs to do, everything else will take care of itself.

He has to want it, taste it, feel it and work hard to achieve it. He’s still growing and developing. If he works as hard on his pitching this spring as he does his academics, and vice-versa, he’ll be fine

As iron sharpens iron, so does a friend sharpen a friend. My son’s JV team this year has four pitchers (three of whom are freshman) hitting mid-70’s to mid-80’s, and the varsity team has the two best pitchers (both juniors) in the county. Therefore, he’s playing JV until his junior year. This takes a lot of pressure off of him.


#5

Got a video?


#6

Nothing is impossible…if you want it bad enough.

I topped out at 73 as a freshman in high school. I just wanted a chance to play college baseball.

I topped out at 95mph two weeks ago as a senior in college. Some people told me I would never throw that hard (including one of my idols - a well known “guru” that I still look up to), others including my coach freshman year of college told me what I would become before I even knew what I was capable of.

It doesn’t matter what others think. It matters what you think and how bad you are willing to work to achieve it. Even when I threw 73, there was never a fiber of my being that didn’t believe I was capable of throwing a baseball 90 mph. I knew that there was some way, somehow that I could build my body up to that level and learn how to move my body through space and apply enough force to the baseball to achieve that goal. I just knew it, even when I struggled, and even when I had worked 5 years and still not achieved the goal.

But the results did come. And I’m just getting started.

There is always a way, and there is always someone out there who can show you the path when you lose your way.

Ben


#7

Lanky’s post is gold. Seriously. I was going to start in with the typical comment – Lefties need to be 86-87 mph coming out of high school to pitch at a major D1 school. Righties need to be 88-89. But honestly just read Lanky’s post again. That was essentially my experience, too. Doubters doubted. Believers believed even before I did. It really comes down to work ethic and desire. Lanky is proof of that.


#8

[quote=“ncikman”]Hey guys, I have a question. I am wondering how fast do you need to throw to play college ball then go on to the minor leagues. I know everyone says it’s now about how fast you throw, just say it is for now

I’m a 14 year old freshman in HighSchool and tryouts just finished and I was clocked at 79MPH consistent and accurate. (Made the JV team) [/quote]

I’ve observed my son at 14, eventhough he is 6’-1"+ and 180lb +, is young for HS JV and is competing with 16 year old sophomores who have finished growing and are starting to put on weight and strength. My son’s opinion is he’s nothing special in comparison to his teammates, so he’s loose, enjoying being “nobody” and having fun. No grandiose thoughts for this year. Just make the team, and help out where needed. So far, throwing his 2-seam and a slider, he’s struck out about 75% of his teammates in batting practices, and the coaches are noticing. So are his teammates!

Be patient, learn and listen, enjoy the process, and focus on being your best. Everything else will fall into place in its proper time.


#9

One of Mississippi State University’s main pitchers last year and this year only throws about 82 or so. He’s not really very good though, his career record through the end of last season was only 17-0. :lol: The starters only go 2-3 innings and then Ross Mitchell comes in and pitches 4-6 innings. By the way, MSU finished up number 2 in the country last year.

Edited to add: Jamie Moyer won 20 games two different years in the majors and pitched until he was about 79(Actually he pitched until the year he turned 50) and he topped out in the 70’s

FYI:
Nobody does the college baseball atmosphere like MSU, ask any one who has played them there or look up the all-time game attendance records.


#10

[quote=“LankyLefty”]Nothing is impossible…if you want it bad enough.

I topped out at 73 as a freshman in high school. I just wanted a chance to play college baseball.

I topped out at 95mph two weeks ago as a senior in college. Some people told me I would never throw that hard (including one of my idols - a well known “guru” that I still look up to), others including my coach freshman year of college told me what I would become before I even knew what I was capable of.

It doesn’t matter what others think. It matters what you think and how bad you are willing to work to achieve it. Even when I threw 73, there was never a fiber of my being that didn’t believe I was capable of throwing a baseball 90 mph. I knew that there was some way, somehow that I could build my body up to that level and learn how to move my body through space and apply enough force to the baseball to achieve that goal. I just knew it, even when I struggled, and even when I had worked 5 years and still not achieved the goal.

But the results did come. And I’m just getting started.

There is always a way, and there is always someone out there who can show you the path when you lose your way.

Ben[/quote]
That is a great post Lanky, very inspiring.