My curveball


#1

I just started to learn how to throw a curve, but it moving more like a slider, or in clock terms, 3-9. How do I get it to get more downward movement? Also, everytime I throw it, I always leave it up in the zone, how do i fix this?


#2

I don’t think you should throw a curveball. You hardly have control of your fastball. Having a curveball will just make things worse. It’s another release point to remeber.Heres what you should really do

  1. Maintain decent mechancs and be able to locate
    2)Put movement on your fastball. and not just on kind. try getting different types of movements.

Try these. Personally i think its easier for a pitcher to be succesful because he has less release points to remeber. And less things change.
Then once you get good at this develope a breaking pitch. But I personally hate the curveball alot. Tatds why i learned the splitter. Its a really effective pitch.


#3

It sounds like you’re doing two things…

  1. When you release it, your fingers are on the side of the ball. You want to make sure that your fingers stay on top of the ball.

  2. You could be leaving it up because your release point is too far back. When throwing the curve, you want to release it out in front.

Hope that helps…


#4

Ideally, one should throw all of their pitches from the same release point. I know some will say it’s good to be able to throw from different release points to give the batter different looks. But that only works if the release point DOESN’T tell the batter which pitch is coming. In other words, you’d need to be able to throw all of your pitches from all of your release points. It’s a nice idea but it’s hard to master and most pitchers can’t do it. And there’s a good reason why it’s hard to learn. The release point is determined by the mechanics leading up to it. So having multiple release points means having multiple mechanics. Why would anyone want to do that? Why try to get good at doing things multiple ways when you can focus on trying to get good at doing things just one way?

I think it’s better to throw all of your pitches from the same release point. Combine this with hiding the ball (which is easier to do with delayed shoulder rotation) and getting your release point closer to home plate and you’ll make things more difficult for batters. Deception is a valuable characteristic to have.


#5

[quote=“GottyJ”]I don’t think you should throw a curveball. You hardly have control of your fastball. Having a curveball will just make things worse. It’s another release point to remeber.Heres what you should really do

  1. Maintain decent mechancs and be able to locate
    2)Put movement on your fastball. and not just on kind. try getting different types of movements.

Try these. Personally i think its easier for a pitcher to be succesful because he has less release points to remeber. And less things change.
Then once you get good at this develope a breaking pitch. But I personally hate the curveball alot. Tatds why i learned the splitter. Its a really effective pitch.[/quote]

are u kidding me? the curveball is an awesome pitch… especially when you might be able to develop a curve like kevin millwood, felix hernandez, AJ burnett, and justin verlander… talk about major hooks…personally my fav. pitch is the curve followed right behind by the fastball… but i dont know how to throw a curve so well which sux…


#6

[quote=“toro15”]
are u kidding me? the curveball is an awesome pitch… especially when you might be able to develop a curve like kevin millwood, felix hernandez, AJ burnett, and justin verlander… talk about major hooks…personally my fav. pitch is the curve followed right behind by the fastball… but i dont know how to throw a curve so well which sux…[/quote]

yes the curve ball is an effective pitch. but that doesnt mean that you absolutly need it. try a change up for starters…you would be suprised with th results if you can learn to throw a good one


#7

you can’t make it anywhere with just a fastball and changeup, i’m sorry, but you just can’t, you have to add one more pitch into that mix, whether it be a slider, curve, sinker, knuckleball, screwball, forkball, splitfinger, slurve, or something like that, you need 3 pitches, that’s the first thing scouts will tell you to work on, longtoss and develop a good third pitch if you don’t have it, johan for example, wouldn’t be nearly as good if he didn’t have that decent slider, because people could guess on his changeup and fastball more often and he’d get hit a lot harder, that third, fourth, or even fifth pitch makes a lot more possiblilities and thoughts go through a hitters mind and gets them offbalance, unsure of what pitch is coming, and a little on their heels for if a offspeed pitch comes, you don’t get that when you only have a fastball changeup, now don’t get me wrong, the changeup is a great pitch, in my mind, it’s my favorite pitch, but my fastball and changeup would be nothing without my slider and curveball, if you know how and when to throw the curveball, it’s a great pitch, on the other hand, it can ruin arms and careers, so it’s a risky pitch to learn without mentoring with you on the mound, or buy a video, or something like that


#8

greg maddux. he hardly ever throws a breaking pitch. im not saying dont throw a curveball. im saying work on establishing the change first. i know that is redundant right now to other people but it really helps. learn the curve after. (or slider or whatever floats your boat.)


#9

greg maddux. he hardly ever throws a breaking pitch. im not saying dont throw a curveball. im saying work on establishing the change first. i know that is redundant right now to other people but it really helps. learn the curve after. (or slider or whatever floats your boat.)[/quote] i dont know about that, i’m a huge cubs fan and watch a lot of maddux’s games, he throws curveballs, no sliders, but he does throw curveballs, his change isint so great cause he dosent throw 90 anymore, but its still effective


#10

Mets reliever Aaron Heilman only throws a fastball and a change … he rarely throws his slider, hardly ever … while he is effective with just two pitches, I think he’d be better served incorporating the breaking ball …

Heilman used to be a starter, and as a starter he threw the slider more, but now out of the pen he’s pretty much abandoned it.


#11

[quote=“andrew.ra.”]Mets reliever Aaron Heilman only throws a fastball and a change … he rarely throws his slider, hardly ever … while he is effective with just two pitches, I think he’d be better served incorporating the breaking ball …

Heilman used to be a starter, and as a starter he threw the slider more, but now out of the pen he’s pretty much abandoned it.[/quote]i believe heilman injured his shoulder or arm, sometime in the last two years, that could explain that


#12

Hi,

To throw a curve, think of making a horseshoewith your fingers. The ball must rollout over the leading edge of the horseshoe not off the finger tips (as a slider or slurve would).

Arm excelleration should be thought of as more downward cutting your hand swifty away. In order to get the right spin, try it with a nerf ball, make sure it is spinning correctly from 12 to 6 or 1 to 7. It should take a nasty drop. When you have mastered the spin on the nerf, then transfer to a baseball. Make sure the sensation & rotation are the same.

Many of the great strike out pitchers threw curveballs:

Koufax (according to Neyer/James had the best)
Ryan (who threw his with a straight wrist-and really hard)
Blyleven (the greatest curve ever-my opinion)
Mordeccai Brown( whose can not be easily dupicated)

Today

Tom Gordon (who throws a hard Curve and a big slow Change up curve too)
Barry Zito

As far as leaving it up in the strike zone, try the rotation thing first. Also how old are you, some guys will tell you minimum age is 14 1/2 and some think 17.

Rmemeber too arm slot will have a bearing on your rotation 12-6 or 1 to 7,

Ian


#13

i think having a curve ball changes how many pitches u throw and also the difference between a win and a loss. Last year when i pitched my coach didnt allow us to throw curveballs and every game getting into the 5th inning was when i would lose the game becausec my fastball would loose its movement. You need a curve to keep them off balance. When i played in the summer league for my school i threw the curve and it made a huge difference on how long i was able to go and the amount of Ks. It also allowed me to have movement on my fastball late in the game.