Moving up to the big field


#1

My son has played on the small field now for 4 years, he will be 13 next year and will move up to the bigger field and the longer pitching distance. Is there any advice you could give me?


#2

Changing speeds will become more effective. Make sure he is really getting a good grasp for his changeup, as this will be an effectuve pitch from a further mound.


#3

How big of an adjustment it will be depends on what you mean by “small field” and “big field”. If “small field” means the Little League 46x60 field and the “big field” means 60x90 field, then the adjustment will be biggest. If the “small field” is an intermediate travel ball field size, then the adjustment won’t be as big.

Regardless, start practicing on the big field well in advance of actually having to play on that size field. In other words, work your way up to it. To do this, go out on the bigger field regularly but limit the number of pitches thrown initially. Then gradually increase the limit.

Lots of long toss is also good.


#4

[quote=“Roger”]How big of an adjustment it will be depends on what you mean by “small field” and “big field”. If “small field” means the Little League 46x60 field and the “big field” means 60x90 field, then the adjustment will be biggest. If the “small field” is an intermediate travel ball field size, then the adjustment won’t be as big.

Regardless, start practicing on the big field well in advance of actually having to play on that size field. In other words, work your way up to it. To do this, go out on the bigger field regularly but limit the number of pitches thrown initially. Then gradually increase the limit.

Lots of long toss is also good.[/quote]

what he means is his kid will be pitching from 60.5 ft now instead of shorter.

My advice to you is , get your kid practicing on these fields you’ll play on. Now that the mound will be on a “hill” thayt might be the biggest obstacle for him, adjusting to the hill . the sooner you get him experiences the hill the better


#5

My two cents:

Work on a changeup, I did have one worth anything in little league, but from 60 feet it can be a great pitch especially against older kids who are already on their front foot due to the slower speed of a younger guy.

Throw from 60 feet and be pacient it’s amazing how much 14.5 feet will do to make a great pitch an easily taken ball. There’s a lot of distance to get used to, it’s a tight learning curve but a short learning curve as well.
Learn to hit your spots unless he’s got a golden arm (a 13 yo around here can hit 84, lol) hitting spots are huge because you’ll only be able to throw it by them if you set them up with good pitches before hand.

I would definately recommend fall ball because it’s a much more laid back atmosphere so you can learn and get down new parts of pitching.


#6

[quote=“jgoff”]My son has played on the small field now for 4 years, he will be 13 next year and will move up to the bigger field and the longer pitching distance. Is there any advice you could give me?[/quote]it wont be as much as a difference as you think. the mound is higher and will add speed to his pitches so the only thing you need to work on is him getting used to the mound and throwing strikes, also he has to concentrate a lot harder than in little leauge because most liekly, the strike zone will be much smaller than in the younger leagues…


#7

I pitched when I was 12 at a smaller field, and moved up to a bigger field at 13, due to the cut-off date. Make sure you have him throwing longer distances in order to adjust his arm, and keep his mechanics straight. If he trys to over throw, his adjustment will be tough. He’ll physically adjust.


#8

Get him on a 60’ mound as soon as possible and start catching him, but catch from 15 feet in front of home plate and work back gradually (over weeks).

For example, start at 15 feet in front, then after a week of him getting comfortable on the mound, move back 3-5 feet (so that you’re 10 feet in front of home plate) for a week, then another 3-5 feet the next week, and so on.

After about a month of you moving back gradually, he should be at around the right distance, but don’t rush him. “Listen” to his arm and make your moves backward when he looks to be throwing almost effortlessly.

One of the keys is to keep him throwing on a downward plane; as you move back tell him it’s OK to bounce pitches rather than arcing / rainbowing the ball to reach. Of course you’ll want to make sure you have a mask and a cup!

Now once he’s throwing off the mound at 60’ comfortably for a few weeks, you might even want to keep going back, to 75’, once in a while, to get him stretched out and so that 60’ doesn’t look so far anymore. But that’s down the road — something to consider later on.


#9

the move to the big field… that’s when my big league dreams died for good.


#10

Oh thats encouraging. xD