Most Common Mechanical Flaws

What do you think are the most common mechanical flaws at the high school level?

  1. Not getting the hips moved forward towards the target soon enough
  2. Lack of Hip/Shoulder separation
  1. Timing problems leading to opening up early.
  1. Dropping the glove early (adding to the problem of opening shoulders too early.

  2. Pulling the back knee forward and inward

  3. Not enough momentum generated in the stride

Would everyone agree that most mechanical flaws are a result of lack of general strength and conditioning? I think that’s where it all starts.

In younger kids, strenght certainly plays a bigger role. But, for high school kids, I think more problems are due to habitual bad mechanics. For example, dropping the glove can be a strength issue for young kids but I don’t think it is for high school age kids. It’s mostly likely just a bad habit for high school kids.

Ok two questions what does dropping the glove early mean? And what is the problem with pulling the knee forward and inward beacause I filmed my slef and noticed I do that?

1.) Rushing. Don’t think the speed and power your body creates will go into the velocity and movement of a pitch. A rushed body without proper timing leads to a lagging arm and injury.

2.) Overthrowing. Overthrowing is when you put too much into arm movement and stop throwing with your entire body. Pitchers usually overthrow at the beginning of a game of at an important point of the game and the ball usually gets left up high in the zone.

3.) Throwing across the body. Throwing across the body usually happens when your legs become unsynched. You can not use your lower body effectively during the thrust and follow-through and you put your arm into danger.

Just wanna point out before getting any hate messagers that those points came from The Art of Pitching by Tom Seaver. Enjoy.

I agree i think those are right, but in Picture Pefect Pitcher it says something like some pros throw across their body (Nolan Ryan?) sorry my friend told me so i dont no the exact information.

andy pettite throws across his body, tom glavine used to do it too. they didnt have problems but jimmy key threw across his body and he got a lot of arm troubles. they all threw curveballs which isn’t really goosd for the arm either. when i throw a forkball i can get curveball action without the wrist elbow or finger snap

One of the only things I could think of (which, most likely, is WRONG but oh well) is that they were synched. They threw across their bodies with synched leg motions I think in the book Tom Seaver meant when you become unsynched you start throwing across your body (if you already don’t do so). Just a guess sorry I don’t have a good actual answer :frowning:

:shock: In one post you say you get curveball action on your forkball and on another you say it has knuckleball movement, that’s one hell of a pitch…

:shock: In one post you say you get curveball action on your forkball and on another you say it has knuckleball movement, that’s one hell of a pitch…[/quote]

i can throw it 5 different ways tail inside on leftys, cut inside on righties, go straight down to the ground, drop back in the zone like a curveball and go straight with spiral spin. i throw this pitch friom 70 to 80 percent of the time you have to get different look to it.

Normally, after the hands break and the stride begins, the throwing arm extends back and the glove arm extends out front. Dropping the glove early means dropping the glove from the position out front well before the front foot plants. Doing so often pulls the shoulders open early. Not good.

:shock: In one post you say you get curveball action on your forkball and on another you say it has knuckleball movement, that’s one hell of a pitch…[/quote]

i can throw it 5 different ways tail inside on leftys, cut inside on righties, go straight down to the ground, drop back in the zone like a curveball and go straight with spiral spin. i throw this pitch friom 70 to 80 percent of the time you have to get different look to it.[/quote]

I’m pretty sure a forkball doesn’t tail, curve, or cut. I’m not doubting you throw a decent-good forkball but I’m doubting it does all of the above mentioned. You might just be using different grips and finger pressures if your ball is tailing or cutting. If this were the case then why would we have curveballs, cutters, or sinkers?

He uses a forkball grip and does different things with it. It doesn’t matter what you call it. A forkball, a curveball with a forkball grip, a sinker with a forkball grip; if it works it works. He can call it whatever he wants. You can call it whatever you want. He explained what he does with the grip, so it’s not like he’s lying to you. So stop bashing him.

Since a splitter, cutter, and sinker are actually just a split-fingered fastball, cut fastball, and sinking fastball, if i say “I can throw a fastball than can dive, cut, and sink” am I lying?

A 3-fingered or 4-fingered fastball are just changeups. You can call a fastball a 2-fingered changeup. It doesn’t matter what it’s called. You know the grip and the hand action, call it whatever you want.

[quote=“magicbumm328”]Ok two questions what does dropping the glove early mean? And what is the problem with pulling the knee forward and inward beacause I filmed my slef and noticed I do that?[/quote]Let me start by saying that all of the responses in this entire thread are given as opinions based on what we’ve all experienced, seen or been taught. These are my personal views and not presented as “laws” or “absolutes”.

The problem that the glove can present is that it has a certain amount of weight that, when it’s out at the end of an extended arm, can have the effect of “wanting”’ to drop. This quite often brings the front shoulder with it, earlier than you want it to. I find this particularly prevalent in kids and in some who have been taught to “point the glove at the target”, a cue I find weak since I’ve yet to find a hiqh level pitcher who actually does it and dropping the glove is often the result with kids. As always, my recommendation is to study the pros in the video section of this board for what they do with the lead arm.

Regarding the “pulling the knee in” issue, I find this to be a cue that has been taught much but also has no significant support in the actual mechanics of high level pitchers. I find that pitchers who employ this technique with the intent of facilitating hip rotation tend to not get their upper body and release point as much forward as the elite pro pitchers do. They tend to be “held back” relative to what you’ll see in the pros. Check out the videos in the “library” portion of this site and you’ll see the upper leg (the femur) extended out behind them and rotated, with the sole of the back foot pretty much pointing to the sky. The knee is NOT in by the other one at release. All of this indicates that the the back leg and hip has fully rotated, as opposed to what I see in those that pull the back knee forward.

[quote=“Top_Secret”]1.) Rushing. Don’t think the speed and power your body creates will go into the velocity and movement of a pitch. A rushed body without proper timing leads to a lagging arm and injury.[/quote]I kind of disagree with this but maybe not. Speed and power of your body most definitely CAN go into the velo of a pitch. Most definitely. There is a big “IF” there, though. The timing part is where I agree with your statement. Let’s put this another way. Speed of body movement CAN lead to velo IF the timing of the parts allows it to. The wording of your statement could be taken by some that it CAN’T help with velo when, in reality, it can, IF …

[quote=“Top_Secret”]Just wanna point out before getting any hate messagers that those points came from The Art of Pitching by Tom Seaver. Enjoy.[/quote]Let’s remember that Seaver had his own style of pitching that isn’t the only successful one.

Sorry about that dm that’s what I meant to say but I just reread it and realized it could have been taken as: even if your timing is good it still wont effect velocity. But I really meant if you rush yourself most likely you wont have good timing and then the speed and power of your body wont have too much of an effect.

Yea I just got that book yesterday, my dad ordered it and I never knew he did until it got here. Its actually really cool because not only does it give you Tom Seaver stuff but give you pictures of other pitchers pitcher throughout their wind-ups. I’m not sure how much the book is but I’d recommend it to you guys.

i think one of the biggest things i see is kids thinking you have to grip the ball tight and muscel up to throw hard, and its just the opposite.
another thing i see alot of is the lack of getting a good push off with there legs.