Mid 80's sidearmer chance at pro ball?


#1

Hey guys,

Its been a while since I’ve posted but I feel the need to ask a quick question. I used to throw around 85-88 touching 89 at times. However, lately my velocity since entering college (D1) has diminished a little. My 2 seam is my best pitch and it sits in the 82-84 range when my 4 seam sits in the 84-86 range. My off speed pitches include a change-up and slider. I have pretty good command of the strike zone and make my living off of movement and being down zone (I am a ground ball pitcher). If you look at pedro martinez I have the same sort of arm angle he does. I am sidearm but not bent over like most sidearmers now a days. My question is if in four years of being in college and my velocity doesn’t go up do i have a chance at playing pro ball?


#2

[quote=“huskyfan101”]Hey guys,

Its been a while since I’ve posted but I feel the need to ask a quick question. I used to throw around 85-88 touching 89 at times. However, lately my velocity since entering college (D1) has diminished a little. My 2 seam is my best pitch and it sits in the 82-84 range when my 4 seam sits in the 84-86 range. My off speed pitches include a change-up and slider. I have pretty good command of the strike zone and make my living off of movement and being down zone (I am a ground ball pitcher). If you look at pedro martinez I have the same sort of arm angle he does. I am sidearm but not bent over like most sidearmers now a days. My question is if in four years of being in college and my velocity doesn’t go up do i have a chance at playing pro ball?[/quote]
Are you a RHP or LHP? Righties typically have to throw harder than lefties, but it is still possible. My question is why the velocity has diminished. When did you begin to lose a little velo and can you associate it with something that can be changed to get it back? More can never hurt if you can control it.


#3

I was one of those “snake jazzers”, many moons ago—a finesse pitcher, not much on speed, but with control, command and an ever-expanding repertoire of good breaking stuff. My best pitch was a slider which I nicknamed “Filthy McNasty” (after a character in an old W.C. Fields movie) because that was exactly what it was, with a sharp late break; and being a sidearmer I used the crossfire extensively—this is a beautiful and deadly move which works only with the sidearm delivery—which gave me three times as many pitches as I had. My second-best pitch was a very good knuckle-curve, and I also had a whole closetful of changeups. The fact is, if you can’t overpower the hitters you have to outthink and outfox them, which was what I did.
It didn’t hurt one bit that I had a pitching coach who was one of the finest anyone could ever hope to work with—Ed Lopat, who was a key member of the Yankees’ legendary Big Three pitching rotation and an extra pitching coach for the Yankees during his tenure with them. He was one of the greatest strategic pitchers in the history of the game, and he shared his knowledge and expertise with me, and what I learned from him was nothing short of priceless. So I’m telling you—if you don’t have the velocity (and I do think it’s rather overrated), you can get on very well with several good breaking pitches. You’re a sidearmer, right? Have you ever tried the crossfire? You should.
And a lot of pitchers who were even slower than you have been very successful in the majors—you did name a few. So go to it! 8) :slight_smile:


#4

Yes I am a RHP and what is the crossfire?


#5

As I said, the crossfire is a move that works only with the sidearm delivery, so you’re lucky indeed. You’re a righthander, as I am. So you go into the windup, but instead of pitching directly to the plate you take one step toward third base, whip around and fire the pitch in from that angle. To the batter is looks as if it’s coming at him from third base, and just watch him go WTF as it clips the corner for a strike. I discovered that delivery when I was about thirteen, and I fell so in love with it that I wound up using it a lot—which fact was not lost on my pitching coach. One day when he was helping me resolve a problem with my circle change, he said “I know you’re going to crossfire it. You use that move with everything you throw.” And indeed, it will work with any pitch.
You have a nice little selection of stuff there, by the way. The crossfire will give you twice as many pitches. And here’s another thing—my pitching coach once told me that just about any pitch can be turned into a nice changeup. He demonstrated a few for me, and I grabbed a couple of them, worked them up and added them to my arsenal.
Have fun! :slight_smile: