Meditation

I always hear people say that meditation can greatly help pitching and focus in a game. I am interested in trying it although i really wouldn’t know where to start (meditating). Can anyone help me out?

After an inning, most pitchers walk off the field and sit at one end of the dugout/bench and kind of get into their own space. I had one pitcher(15) that not only did this but was one of the most sober young men I’ve ever coached. In fact he was all business - all the time. Although I see nothing wrong with his approach, I did feel kind-a sorry for the kid, --not enjoying the game and all. So, one afternoon before his start I asked him why so quite,…why so sober. His response was …" I’m into meditation, my inner self,… my inner strength." I had to take a step back and think to myself…“Geesh – lighten up scooter!” By the way, I wasn’t the only one who felt this way. So, that afternoon after he finished his first inning, he sat all by himself and closed his eys, taking slow deliberate breaths - and all to a backround chorus of his teammates singing-----------------
" Ouhummmmmmm ----Ouhummmmm." It totally cracked the kid up. It was also the beginning of a great season for him, our club, and parents.
Even though we finished second to dead last. So look, you’re only a kid once in life and the need for the meditation stuff – or going to your happy place, will be upon you sooner then you think. Go out there and live a little.
Coach B.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]After an inning, most pitchers walk off the field and sit at one end of the dugout/bench and kind of get into their own space. I had one pitcher(15) that not only did this but was one of the most sober young men I’ve ever coached. In fact he was all business - all the time. Although I see nothing wrong with his approach, I did feel kind-a sorry for the kid, --not enjoying the game and all. So, one afternoon before his start I asked him why so quite,…why so sober. His response was …" I’m into meditation, my inner self,… my inner strength." I had to take a step back and think to myself…“Geesh – lighten up scooter!” By the way, I wasn’t the only one who felt this way. So, that afternoon after he finished his first inning, he sat all by himself and closed his eys, taking slow deliberate breaths - and all to a backround chorus of his teammates singing-----------------
" Ouhummmmmmm ----Ouhummmmm." It totally cracked the kid up. It was also the beginning of a great season for him, our club, and parents.
Even though we finished second to dead last. So look, you’re only a kid once in life and the need for the meditation stuff – or going to your happy place, will be upon you sooner then you think. Go out there and live a little.
Coach B.[/quote]

There’s nothing wrong in building inner confidence through meditating… Is it necessary, no, but can it help, yes, but it depends on the person. Frankly, practicing simple breathing techniques can have a positive influence on a player’s performance. It doesn’t make a difference whether your 12, 14, or 21…

Great example, the pitcher in Hard Ball…

[quote](I love it when you call me Big Pop-pa)
Throw your hands in the air, if youse a true player
(I love it when you call me Big Pop-pa)[/quote]

… When he couldn’t wear his headsets while pitching, his performance suffered…

Pitchers have all sorts of techniques they can use to get themselves focused on the mound, ranging from meditation to what Mark Fidrych used to do—talking to the ball. I’d like to share a story with you about what happened to me one time.
You hear all sorts of horror stories from pitchers at every level, all centering on “My stuff isn’t working!” Of course, I heard these stories, and usually I paid them no mind, but one off-season I started thinking about them, and although I didn’t realize it they were bothering me more than I dared let on. One night I had a horrendous nightmare—I was heating up in the bullpen and I suddenly realized that my two best pitches, the slider and the knuckle-curve, had gone into hiding and would not come out, and when I went out to take the mound I saw that the opposing batters had grown to 12 feet high and the bats were six feet long. I awoke with a start and couldn’t get back to sleep for a couple of hours.
So one afternoon, a few hours before a Yankee game, I found myself talking to Ed Lopat about this. I was trying to be casual and offhand but I wasn’t doing a good job of it, because when I asked him how he would handle such a situation he turned my question right back at me—he asked, “How would you handle it?” That stopped me cold, and I suddenly found myself telling him about the nightmare I had had. He listened for a minute, and then he quietly interrupted me and said "We’ll start there."
And then he introduced me to a strategy I had never suspected he knew anything about.
He had a good working knowledge of the use of hypnosis as an adjunct to his work as a pitching coach, and he proceeded to take me deep into an exploration of the situation. And before long we hit the real focal point of this exploration, something I had not been aware of—my
uncertainty about pitching in tight spots with less than my best stuff. And he went right after it. In a little more than an hour he knocked the whole problem out of commission, restored my confidence, gave me more reassurance and support than I could ever imagine, and demolished any anxieties I might have had about the situation, using a combination of direct and indirect suggestions. It was an incredible experience.
And the next day I went out and pitched a two-hit shutout…
You just never know what a pitching coach can do to help. 8) :slight_smile: