Mechanics change


#1

My son (12u) went to a new pitching instructor yesterday. He has been taught when breaking, to break with thumbs down and push the ball and glove downwards and then out. Last night, he was shown to basically break straight back and push the shoulder blades together. This seems like throwing a dart to me. Any insights??
Thanks


#2

I guess it depends on how he transitions from those positions to his cocked position and what his arm throwing motion is like. It seems like he’s having him focus on loading his scapulas. It shouldn’t lead to a dart throwing motion.


#3

Unless there is some specific issue the instructor is trying to correct, instructing hand position and arm path is over-instructing, IMHO. But even if the instructor was trying to correct some issue, you’d have a hard time convincing me that the above instruction was necessary or appropriate. Hand position and arm motion are things that do - and should be allowed to - differ from pitcher to pitcher. Arm motion needs to fit into the time allotted for it by the lower half which establishes overall timing for the entire delivery. Changing arm path will likely affect its timing and will be unsuccessful unless a corresponding timing change is implemented somewhere else in the delivery.


#4

Just seemed odd to me. He has always been taught to push his thumbs down and hands follow the knee down and around to the power postion. I always thought that created a bigger arch with his throwing motion. He said looking from home plate he wants to be able to see his arm/elbow behind is body when cocked at the top.
This is the first time he has been to a “paid” instructor, so just wanted to check before we continue with him. Thanks for the input.


#5

If he’s teaching that semi circular arm path, that tends to be more unsuccessful. If you look at most (not all but a lot) major league pitchers, they have a delayed hold after hand brake ( to prevent from early cocking) then they pintch the arm back while flexing the arm while moving the arm up. For an example of this, look at someone like Aroldis Chapman, Sonny Gray or David Robertson to name a few. Also, changing arm path could lead to changing your timing which could decrease velocity. Unless your arm path is really bad, don’t focus on it and do t change it. Focus more on a dynamic lower half.


#6

That’s right, when the arm is fully cocked, you should be able to see his arm behind his back. This is showing he is scap loading which is keeping his shoulders back which is good