Me pitching at my batting cage




Me pitching at my batting cage…love to here some posts on what i might be doing wrong.

Not bad. I noticed the following:

(1) You take your eyes off your target and look down momentarily during your delivery. That causes unwanted head movement. Plus, it takes a certain amount of time for the eyes to refocus on that spot on the ground and then refocus again on the target.

(2) You lean back (toward 1B) at foot strike. As your hips and shoulders come around, it becomes a sideways lean towards 1B. This is a posture issue that can affect release point and consistency. It can also lead to opening up the shoulders too early which robs velocity and puts more stress on the arm.

(3) Your glove seems to flop around around a bit. I’d prefer to see it stabilize out in front to help create a stable base for the throwing arm to throw against.

(4) Right after release, you look down at the 1B side of the mound. I’d rather you continue to keep your eyes on the target.

Well, I must say that I’m suitably impressed with this young man’s mechanics. Nice explosive motion. Nice leading with the front hip sideways. I’m going to disagree with Roger on a couple of points here. Sorry, Roger. :wink: Doesn’t happen often, you know.

Although I believe that excessive amounts of lean CAN be a problem, I do believe that it is quite possible to have SOME lean and be just fine. My thought on this particular pitcher is that any lean he may have is minimal, at best. Actually, I almost don’t see any at all. I think he does a great job into and through landing in this regard.

quote=“Roger” Your glove seems to flop around around a bit. I’d prefer to see it stabilize out in front to help create a stable base for the throwing arm to throw against.[/quote]Again, just to confuse this kid completely, I think his glove side action is very, very good, with one small suggestion for further improvement. If you compare his motion to MLB guys (see Kevin Brown and Nolan Ryan below), you’ll see that he brings his glove up on the 3rd base side, slightly and the glove hand is pronated (arm internally rotated). Just like the big boys. Then the elbow comes across, horizontally, just like Ryan and Brown, BUT, and this is where this pitcher could improve, he drops it down too early. My recommendation is to bring it horizontally at shoulder height longer, before turning it over and dropping it. You MUST ensure that this is balanced by the throwing elbow doing the same thing to “load the scapulas”, or pinch the shoulder blades together as this is done. If not, the movement on the front side will bring the back one with it and cause early shoulder opening.

My other observation is that the stride could be a bit longer as a result of that nice front hip drive being a bit longer to build up a bit more momentum with increasing tempo.

All in all, good job heelan13!!

real nice. real nice. If I had to nit-pick in my amateurish fashion, I’d point out the head movement, especially how it’s leaning towards first and down at the point of release.

But real nice there, kid.

How hard do you throw?

aim me or call me its jay21328 or Ristar

im a freshman, 5’6 and i weigh about 115 i throw 77 right now…

Nice job

I can definitely see the momentum start right prior to your knee lift at the top…

dm, great point about the glove being pointed to 3rd base. I think a lot of pitchers simply throw their glove arm straight to the plate too soon and that’s why they tend to fly open too soon. I think breaking with the glove toward 3rd and then toward home can really help in staying closed that extra bit.

I think looking away from the catcher is a good way to improve focus. Most ML pitchers do look away as they begin their wind up, which allows them to relax, turn their shoulders to point to 2nd and home without stress, and to refocus on the mitt prior to release, sharpening their focus for that few moments rather than “over concentrating” and losing muscle relaxation. Personally, I am much more consistent, more accurate, and faster when I refocus rather than maintaining eye contact with the catcher’s mitt from start to finish. I’m no major leaguer, not even a good high school pitcher anymore (30 years past! man where does it go?) but I have worked with many pitching coaches both for myself and recently my son, and they all seem to be okay with it, some even encouraging it.

Now, I would probably not encourage a “Louis Tiant” move, but it worked for him…

I think it’s safe to say you’re really close to maximizing / getting the most out of your frame.

[quote=“dm59”]Well, I must say that I’m suitably impressed with this young man’s mechanics. Nice explosive motion. Nice leading with the front hip sideways. I’m going to disagree with Roger on a couple of points here. Sorry, Roger. :wink: Doesn’t happen often, you know.

DM, you’re not suggesting “equal and opposite” are you? :wink: (Keeping the front arm horizontal longer would get him to an equal and opposite position at foot strike, yes?)

Actually, DM, I think we are in agreement on this point. What you referred to as dropping his front elbow (and glove?) is the “floppiness” I referred to. You just described it more eloquently than I did. In the video clips you posted, those guys’ front arm and glove firm up in front to provide a stable base for the throwing arm to throw against. This pitcher’s front arm and glove don’t firm up at that point. I was referring to the same thing - I just called it “floppy”. :smiley:

just commenting,your last pitch is pretty nice.

[quote=“Roger”]DM, you’re not suggesting “equal and opposite” are you?[/quote]Oh, man. You caught me!! :lol: As I was driving to work yesterday morning, I said to myself that you would probably get a kick out of this one.

[quote=“Roger”]Actually, DM, I think we are in agreement on this point. What you referred to as dropping his front elbow (and glove?) is the “floppiness” I referred to.[/quote] OK. I agree. Anyway, I think this kid is very, very solid and his glove side action is ALMOST exactly like guys such as Ryan, Brown and many others (I’ll go so far as to say MOST others). No “pointing the glove” there, thank goodness. 8) He’s got some small mechanical improvements to help out and he needs to work of course on conditioning (not implying that he’s not conditioned well now, just that every pitcher needs to do that) as well as tempo (again, every pitcher needs to work on that).

I’ve really enjoyed seeing this kid’s clips. Again, good job heelan13. Don’t let anyone change any significant items in your mechanics. Fine tuning and hard work (tempo, fluidity, scap loading and explosiveness) is what you need now.

scap loading doesnt work. People dont get the shoulder and arm deliever the ball and dont produce all the speed. the way to get better speed and be a better pitcher is not to waste time scap loading and trying to improve on being more explosive. On a mound. Flat ground is totaly different then mound.

RIstar
Regardless of what your hero, Dick Mills, says, ALL hard throwing pitchers scap load!!! Check out this pic of Roger Clemens and tell me he’s not scap loading. Check out the video below of Nolan Ryan and tell me he’s not scap loading. Or the video of Roger. I’ve got oodles of videos that show this. Want some? There are several more videos in the “Pitching Resources” section. Go there and study some. Real study, instead of simply regurgitating what Dick Mills or anybody else says. Do some research of your own. Understand what the term really means and then look very closely at what MLB pitchers do.

Mills has always stated that the pitcher needs to “pinch his shoulder blades together”. Can you say “scap loading”?

RIstar. It’s part of the build up of elastic energy that fuels arm acceleration. Sound familiar? How long have you been listening to Dick? I’ve been doing it for several years. I’m pretty familiar with his teachings.

If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it’s a duck!!!



thanks everyone ill keep conditioning all off season and working on some little things . You’ve really made my confidence go up now being in high school, i really needed it. Again thanks a lot!

“Scap Loading” ?? Can someone define what this term refers to… what positioning of what body parts this refers to???

Scap loading is a term first coined by Paul Nyman of SETPRO which refers to the act of pinching the shoulder blades back to do two things.

Firstly, it increases the range of motion for the arm. The scapular complex contains the shoulder socket. Move the scapula and the humerus (upper arm bone) moves, potentially, also. This allows the humerus to remain aligned within the socket even though everything has been pulled back.

Secondly, it facilitates the “loading” process of various muscles and connective tissues. Mills talks about “prestretch” and “elastic energy”. The “stretch shortening cycle” is also discussed a lot, especially on this board. For simplicity sake, you load and unload. The “unload” subsequent to an effective “load” is significantly more powerful than without this process. The unload must happen immediately after the load. Any pause and the energy just built up is dissipated and wasted with respect to the pitching motion.

All hard throwing pitchers do it, whether you call it “scapula loading” or something else, or wish to ignore it all together. What Mills actually says is that focussing on an aggressive scap load is not the way to go. He continually talks about pinching the shoulder blades together and thrusting the chest out as the shoulders rotate. That’s the same thing, RIstar.

There are those who say that scap loading is dangerous because it stretches tissues on the front side of the shoulder and socket beyond anyone’s idea of a safety zone. That may be true but it’s still done. Some also warn of “hyperflexion”, another Nyman term. Hyperflexion would be where the humerus is pulled back behind the shoulder line but the scaps have not been pulled back to make that happen. In this case, the humerus may not be aligned in the socket and tissues could suffer from impingement. Nyman has also come out to say that it would be very difficult for hyperflexion to actually happen.

I agree that focussing on this to extreme levels is not what we want. Focussing on any one single element isn’t a good thing. The whole package must be smooth and fluid.

Thanks. I’ll have to think about this element of the motion. I think it’s something I do naturally.

Scap loading can be dagerous. and i do not think any kid should be doing it. It will tear your shoulder apart and you dont want that.