Making a Premier Baseball Team


#1

I decided I wanted to train this year, to try out for a Premier Baseball Team in my province. This is a good team, and only the best make it.

Team: http://www.bcpbl.com/en/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=39&Itemid=50

I’m planning not to do any other sports such as Football for next year, so I can train baseball everyday, and workout. I think, if I can make this team, make a name for myself, I can maybe be drafted. Most Canadian ball players in the MLB come out from this league.

This is my daily journal: http://www.letstalkpitching.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=9623

I want to know what you guys did to get into the good teams you are on, and your successes. I really love baseball, and my dream is to make it to the Pro’s. My goal is to make the team.


#2

Good luck! We’re pulling for you.

When are the tryouts and what are you doing to prepare for them?


#3

I have been approached by another premier team in the same league as that team you posted, the Ontario Blue Jays. I throw low eighties topping out at 85 on occasion with pretty poor control and what I like to think of as a dirty breaking ball. I’m about an average player when compared to the rest of the team. These kids are good, no doubt about it, one of the kids topping out at 90mph at 17 years old.

What I would do would be to go to a few of the camps they put on throughout the year to familiarize yourself with the coaches, see what they teach and if you like how they go about things and find their schedule and go out to a few of the games to get a feel for the skill level and competition involved.

If they do show interest in you and approach you, ask all the questions you want to know the answers to. Ask if you are going to be a starter or if you are going to be a backup. If a backup, how far in the order are you to get some playing time. What I mean by that is if the starter gets hurt or needs a rest, how many players will get the playing time before you do? How many players get scholarships to colleges? Lots of players from that league get scholarships but the question is, are they full scholarships or just partial scholarships? I know that the OBJ cost 6 grand a year to play for them and most of the players only get scholarships to lower end DII, DII, community colleges. So is 6grand really worth the possibility of a 8 thousand dollar scholarship?

Also, you want to make sure that you are going to get on the actual team come playing season. Some kids pay the money, go to training for the winter then come spring they are told that they didn’t make the opening squad.

These are just some of the things you have to think about when making this decision. Goo luck.


#4

The tryouts are next year this time.

Preparing, I am working out about 2 -3 times a day. I try to involve baseball in every workout. I also do towel drills. I swing the bat a couple times a week. I’m gonna go to the library near my house and start renting book on baseball about both pitching and hitting, and try to make me a better baseball player. This year is going to be a prep for making this team. Since the league I am playing in now, is a metal bat league, I am going to purchase a wood bat, to practice for the wood bat league next year. Everyday, I am going to try to play catch and train, train, and train. I really want to make this team, and I hope my training will pull off!


#5

[quote=“OffSet”]I have been approached by another premier team in the same league as that team you posted, the Ontario Blue Jays. I throw low eighties topping out at 85 on occasion with pretty poor control and what I like to think of as a dirty breaking ball. I’m about an average player when compared to the rest of the team. These kids are good, no doubt about it, one of the kids topping out at 90mph at 17 years old.

What I would do would be to go to a few of the camps they put on throughout the year to familiarize yourself with the coaches, see what they teach and if you like how they go about things and find their schedule and go out to a few of the games to get a feel for the skill level and competition involved.

If they do show interest in you and approach you, ask all the questions you want to know the answers to. Ask if you are going to be a starter or if you are going to be a backup. If a backup, how far in the order are you to get some playing time. What I mean by that is if the starter gets hurt or needs a rest, how many players will get the playing time before you do? How many players get scholarships to colleges? Lots of players from that league get scholarships but the question is, are they full scholarships or just partial scholarships? I know that the OBJ cost 6 grand a year to play for them and most of the players only get scholarships to lower end DII, DII, community colleges. So is 6grand really worth the possibility of a 8 thousand dollar scholarship?

Also, you want to make sure that you are going to get on the actual team come playing season. Some kids pay the money, go to training for the winter then come spring they are told that they didn’t make the opening squad.

These are just some of the things you have to think about when making this decision. Goo luck.[/quote]

Wow, 6 grand??? this team is $1,200… I have to work in the summer time while training to pay for this registration!!! Sadly I wasn’t born into a family that has that kind of money… :frowning:


#6

Yeah.

The OBJs get an auto by into the perfect game finals, play against major league spring training squads, etc.

One of the better programs in the league.


#7

[quote=“OffSet”]Yeah.

The OBJs get an auto by into the perfect game finals, play against major league spring training squads, etc.

One of the better programs in the league.[/quote]

I guess its worth it. Probably the mlb players that come out of the east come out from that leauge im guessing? Jeff Francis, and Justin Morneau came out of the North Shore Blue Jays.