Major help please

Hey guys… I am brand new to this site, I just registered a couple days ago and have been reading and reviewing as much of the past and current stuff as possible-- it’s alot of information, and a little overwhelming for a novice like me.

Anyways, my son is now a HS freshman, and time is really of the essence now, kind of a countdown to varsity try outs.(are HS try outs usually in the beginning of Feb? I’m in NoCalif…So roughly 5 months to get ready…

I want to help him get started ASAP(yesterday!) on a strength and conditioning program to help prepare him for next season, but we are both kinda clueless about exactly what to do. To make things even more difficult, finances are extremely tight right now, so we’re probably going to have to make do with the little equipment that i currently have…

My son is naturally strong and he’s curently 6’00 " and a very lean 180lbs and can reach 80mph( or so ive been told). But he has never done any type of work out program at all, and I have a feeling his “core” is probably pretty weak, and i dont think he has very good balance either( those 2 things probably go hand in hand i guess?)
I hope i’m not offending anyone with this next statement as it is really most likely just an indication of my ignorance, but when i’m trying to sort through this “pitching workouts and nutritions” forum, all of the information is kinda scattered, and really seperated by specific topics on workouts.
Would I be asking too much if I asked for ya’lls help with creating a really tough and good 5 month workout and conditioning program that culminates with the beginning of the season in Feb, and would also include some ideas on bullpen sessions during that time.
If anyone might be interested, i could reply later with the type of equipment that I already own…
I’m also looking really forward to finding a way to post a video of my son pitching and getting some feedback from that, only problem is for now I dont have a working video camera…

OK, so I thank you all so much for your help everyone

Have you checked into Steven’s book, TuffCuff? That provides both in-season and off-season workout programs.

yes, I have reviewed the Tuffcuff website a little bit, and I’ve read some of what the posters on here have said about it. But from what I understand, there’s quite a few different pieces of equipment that you need for it. The cost for that stuff, along with the $70 it costs for the Tuffcuff, I was kind of hoping to get by with the equipment that I already have in my garage only.

I agree that when purchasing a program or workout book online, it’s tough because you don’t have the opportunity to peruse the pages. You can do TUFFCUFF, however, on limited equipment: a set of dumbbells, a medicine ball, perhaps some lightweight tubing and a strong work ethic. But if after receiving it in the mail, you decide it’s too advanced for where you re right now, please know that you can send it back. Either way, good luck and keep working hard!

Search “Starting Strength” on google. This will allow your kid to create a base of strength with the compound lifts.

Bench
Squat
Deadlift
Incline Bench
Clean

With these 5 excercises mastered your kid should then be able to perform both assist lifts and specific lifts. Make sure to establish a BASE before any isolation is done.

I have the exact body type your son has, and the same velocity. I have been doing the sticky that lanky lefty has with the band exercises, as well as some light dumbbell work in the injury section. I’ve found that in the last month of doing it I’ve noticed some change in just my arm strength. I’ve been doing something along the lines of this.
Monday:legs
Tuesday:upper body
Wednesday:core
Thursday:legs
Friday:upper body
Weekend: depending on how I’m feeling I’ll get some band exercise in or another core exercises

I tend to mix up the workouts on days just so that i’m getting a wider range of workouts on my legs and workouts, as well with core i’d suggest a medicine ball it’s a great workout and you can make them cheap, forget about buying one.

[quote=“Hoysauce”]Search “Starting Strength” on google. This will allow your kid to create a base of strength with the compound lifts.

Bench
Squat
Deadlift
Incline Bench
Clean

With these 5 excercises mastered your kid should then be able to perform both assist lifts and specific lifts. Make sure to establish a BASE before any isolation is done.[/quote]

You people keep beating me to the good suggestions!

I highly recommend what this poster said - except the “Incline Bench.” That’s not one of Mark Rippetoe’s workouts. Bench Press is done on a flat bench.

Anyway, you can sub Pendlay Rows for Power Cleans, which is probably not a bad idea for baseball pitchers. Additionally, doing the DB Bench Press over the barbell bench press is probably better too.

[quote=“kyleb”][quote=“Hoysauce”]Search “Starting Strength” on google. This will allow your kid to create a base of strength with the compound lifts.

Bench
Squat
Deadlift
Incline Bench
Clean

With these 5 excercises mastered your kid should then be able to perform both assist lifts and specific lifts. Make sure to establish a BASE before any isolation is done.[/quote]

You people keep beating me to the good suggestions!

I highly recommend what this poster said - except the “Incline Bench.” That’s not one of Mark Rippetoe’s workouts. Bench Press is done on a flat bench.

Anyway, you can sub Pendlay Rows for Power Cleans, which is probably not a bad idea for baseball pitchers. Additionally, doing the DB Bench Press over the barbell bench press is probably better too.[/quote]

Not trying to start an arguement but i’m just curious why you’d suggest leaving out incline BP? Are you saying it’s because it’s not one of Mark Ripptoe’s workouts? Or is it for another reason? Personally I feel that along with a flat bench press incline helps work different part of the pecks, and I do that instead of finding different workouts to work the pecks and shoulder area.

Really its all up to the person. I include them in my workout but I also static stretch for 15 minutes after most of my workouts that dont include cardio. What I would suggest is do some pushups with your feet up on a chair instead of the incline press. Doing this keeps the upper pecs strong but without beating them to death with weight. Also, what are these Pendlay Rows? and what are their benefits?

Incline bench is fine - though decline bench is not - I was just clarifying that it’s not an exercise in the traditional Starting Strength routine.

Personally, my adapted SS workout for baseball athletes is:

-Back Squat
-Press
-Deadlift
-Pendlay Row
-DB Bench Press

Other Exercises: Chin-ups, Sledgehammer work, Push-ups, lots of foam rolling and movement prep.

That’s a basic template. I think Pendlay Rows (and most other types of rows) are very important for scapular health. Check out Eric Cressey’s stuff on this subject.

On the Pendlay Row:

OK, I’m a complete dummy, I just put 2 and 2 together and realized now that you (Steven Ellis) that runs this forum is the same person that invented the Tuff Cuff program :oops:

WOW, this could be a really good thing… I’m suddenly more interested in ordering this for my son when I know youre here to answer questions (hopefully)…