Lower back pain and tuffcuff

hey everyone. currently im dealing with some lower back pain, due to straining it while lifting something heavy at school. so i havent been conditioning the past couple months, as it hasnt got any better, and why i think it has i reinjure it. i was conditioning for two months up to the back strain, and i need to get started on tuffcuff. how should i get my back to where it needs to be before working out, and what phase should i jump into? all help is greatly appreciated. i am a junior in high school

OUCH!!

There is nothing more mysterious than back problems. The cross-section of muscle tissue, the spine and a roadmap of nerves, makes this portion of the body a nightmare for any athlete, and at any age, with pain and recurring discomfort.

Your in Jr high school which means you’re still young enough to correct most problems associated with youth. But there’s a catch - your growing and developing at the same time. A double edge situation that requires careful going with the sports stuff.

Here’s my suggestions and reasons why:
I’ve worked with pitchers who, for whatever reason, neglected getting back into condition 100%. Instead, some ignored a chronic problem which seemed minor at first, then escalated into a series of nagging problems that haunted them for the rest of their life. I’ve seen one pitcher, a couple of fielders and a few backstops in my time that ended up with spine fusion surgery because of their lack of vision and ignoring advice from specialist in this area. Don’t go there.

If it’s a matter of insurance, expense, etc., there are people out there and organizations that can help you - ASK! If it’s just a matter of not wanting to address the situation, for whatever reason, you’ll pay for it in just a few years - big time.

So, my advice is to STOP. Address this back problem head-on with your parents. You are in no way qualified to make a judgement one way or the other - leave that to the medical professionals.

What you described in your posting is enough to warrant my advice here. Please consider the advice from a coach who use to make his living watching some very talented people make some very bad decisions. Please, don’t be one of them. Ok?

Coach Baker

i aprreciate the response coach. i actually visited the doctor about a month ago when the pain was at its worse and he suggested the pain would go away with some rest. he said some core exercises would help. i guess its my fault for not doing them, but maybe i should start and do them for week and see how i feel?

If your doctor has not suggested a back support - I would start off with one.

There are many different types of supporting equipment, clothing and accessories that can be used as a back support. There are the wrap-around types that go around the waist, with stiffness that snugs the lower back and a velcro front that holds the entire garment together at the belly.

In any event, I would be very cautious doing anything that isn’t charted out by your medical professional - and easy does it.

Now, if you’ve aggrevated the injury to the point where you should make a return visit to your doctor - DO SO.

I sincerely wish you the very best with your progress. By the way - your smart to take this approach. Shows good judgement on your part and a lot of maturity. Stuff that a lot of youngster just pass by.

Coach B.

thanks, that means a lot. by the way, i notice you live in springfield. i live on the cape, and alot of my family lives in that area.

Outstanding baseball country … I use to do a lot of traveling from Barstable, Yarmouth, East Falmouth - then up to Plymouth and as far north as Brockton when I was on the road looking for talent. Nice people, very home-grown types. RI - Warwick to Woosocket was great baeball grazing country too during the 80’s. A lot has drop’d off since then. I’m sure there’s good talent there, over and above the high profile Cape League, but it’ll take time for the economy here in the Commonwealth to afford baseball again. Some of the old fields have given way to building.

Stay the course with your progress, and easy does it. Don’t go any faster than your system is telling you to. Listen to what your body is trying to tell you - when enough is enough, LISTEN. Take it from one who doesn’t have his youth any more - your health is a precious thing. Take care of it.

Best wishes for your recovery and your baseball experience.

Coach B.

Thank you so much, take care

One more thing to add to the discussion, try going to a chiropractor, they actually can work wonders and believe it or not, they may see something that a regular doctor cannot, Why? Because that is their specialty. Some people say they are a load of crap, but I honestly can tell you they work.

my son develops pain and stiffness when he squats. his trainer who is a physical therapist who is an expert in spinal rehab and trains major league players took him completely off squats 2 years ago. he only uses machines @ a club for lower body and does all core/ab work with the spine supported. he has had no further trouble and is considered one of the strongest players in the 2011 class.

anyone who tells you you must squat to become strong is mistaken. you can do it with machines if necessary. our trainer’s philosophy is strengthen the muscle in the planes it grows, train it in the planes you will use it.

and there is a limit to how much you can train. if you over-do it you are @ sub-maximum performance. he doesn’t do more than 3 different exercises targeting the same muscle group and always strengthens both sides.

a common imbalance is your quads are stronger than your hamstrings. after 2 years my guy does just as much with his hamstrings as he does with his quads. very important for a catcher

[quote=“dusty delso”]my son develops pain and stiffness when he squats. his trainer who is a physical therapist who is an expert in spinal rehab and trains major league players took him completely off squats 2 years ago. he only uses machines @ a club for lower body and does all core/ab work with the spine supported. he has had no further trouble and is considered one of the strongest players in the 2011 class.

anyone who tells you you must squat to become strong is mistaken. you can do it with machines if necessary. our trainer’s philosophy is strengthen the muscle in the planes it grows, train it in the planes you will use it.

and there is a limit to how much you can train. if you over-do it you are @ sub-maximum performance. he doesn’t do more than 3 different exercises targeting the same muscle group and always strengthens both sides.

a common imbalance is your quads are stronger than your hamstrings. after 2 years my guy does just as much with his hamstrings as he does with his quads. very important for a catcher[/quote]
You are right, any traditional lift such as squats, cleans, etc. can be substituted with other lifts using machines. However, most people don’t know how to properly create balance within the muscles and with imbalance comes injury. If you can do the traditional lifts, I say do them as you train the body to work as a whole, entire system. This is important, just be careful when only working with machines. Another thing most people do is they build the beach body muscles and forget about the muscles that are most important which are the ones that you don’t see in the back, shoulders, triceps, etc.

Your workouts shouldn’t always be a max, your body adapts and stops building muscles because it is too busy attempting to rebuild, this is why the variation within your lifts is important.

Consider getting something like magnetotherapy, it seems ideal in your case.