Lost art of throwing


#1

Just throwing to warm up the arm is out right stupid. This is not something that helps get the arm warm at all or prepares it for high speeds. What all of use need to teach kids from a little age is to us the tubing exercises to get there arm ready to throw the ball. Kids now and days take there arms for granted.

I can tell you the reason more and more kids are having arm problems and it is because they don’t do the tubing exercises before the game and after to help the arm prepare the arm and then strengthen the arm after the game.

Coaches are the problem also because they don’t notice that kids need to do tubing exercises between starts to keep there arm strong for the next game. So that they can hit peek performance on game day.

I have been doing tubing exercises now after my elbow injury and I can say that it has saved my life from an injury like that again. The other day I pitched on Sunday threw a lot and then on Monday was tired did some tubing felt a little better the next day I had practice I was still pretty sore but I went to practice did some tubing then some light throwing and the soreness went right away this is proof that it does work and you don’t have to have a sore arm anymore.


#2

I understand your point, but think you are mis understanding something in your very decisive statement:

[quote]I can tell you the reason more and more kids are having arm problems and it is because they don’t do the tubing exercises before the game and after to help the arm prepare the arm and then strengthen the arm after the game.
[/quote]

Bob Gibson, Seaver, probably Ryan, and most all of the HOF never touched a theraband or resistance tube. I would wager quite a lot on that one.

So not using it is far from the reason there are more problems because as bands have become more popular, more arms have been ruined.

Now is there any correlation, I seriously doubt it, infact I think bands are productive and great prehibilitation. I’d just be careful if your going to be so decisive with one’s statements.

Personally I don’t use bands much in season, I find I have a very hard time staying loose between innings and actually become more sore than the usual, as I rarely get sore, pitching just makes me a little more still.

I know plenty of people that do them religiously and it sounds like you follow that as well, it does seem to be very effective for many.


Saying kids NEED to use tubing is also a whole other story. It is probably unfortunate and a due to a lack of quality information available to players, but those that use bands are deep in the minority. Many a player has been successful without them.

I understand your point, but statements that are so sure and definite always need a devil’s advocate eh, :wink:


#3

what do you see barry zito, mariano rivera and many other players before they pitch they do tubing or 5lb weights? There is a study that proves that tubing can help mantain a strong arm.


#4

This is why I played devils advocate:

For one you missed my point, thousands have made successful careers without them. You only came up with two names, and I know one is the posterboy for the jaeger stuff, which is fine.

Please read the conclusion:

The only purpose was to determine whether or not the shoulder muscles were activated. The idea was that pitchers may use useless exercises that do little for the arm. There are also many exercises to choose from. This data aloows for a better regimen determined by what muscles are activated per exercise.

NEVER DO THEY ONCE say that it has any correlation to throwing from the exercises. Meaning they did not prove your point at all.
There are many exercises that activate those muscles in the same nature. The bench press is one…

BAND EXERCISES ARE PRODUCTIVE, I already agreed to that, but to say every kid has to do them or their arm will explode isn’t exactly correct.

I told you I’m playing devil’s advocate, and you have missed a lot in your very (possibly excessively) sure statements.

That is a great study you posted, bookmarked it even. Hopefully more of that nature will come out in the near future.


#5

This is from the article

Context: Athletes who throw commonly use rubber-tubing resistance exercises in the field setting to assist with warm-up before throwing. Yet no researchers have described which muscles are being activated or which exercises are most effective during rubber-tubing exercises used by throwers for warm-up.

These 7 exercises exhibited moderate activation (>20% maximal voluntary isometric contraction) in each muscle of the rotator cuff, the primary humeral movers, and the scapular stabilizer muscles. The results suggest that these exercises are most effective in activating the muscles important to the throwing motion and may be beneficial for throwers during their prethrowing warm-up routine

This is something alot pro’s are starting to do. and i have the book nolan ryan wrote and it has 5lb weight exercises i wouldnt be shocked if he didnt do them before he took the field.


#6

The critical statement is that the MAY BE BENEFICIAL for throwers during their prethrowing warm-up routine.

My point was that the research was not investigating that really. It was investigating simply which muscles were activated for which movement.

If pro’s are just starting to do them, then obviously their arms didn’t explode before they began using them.


The theme being don’t use such broad statements if you want to be definitive and make statements that are closed, and have no question in them.

You shouldn’t do that in most any case, but if you’ve acheived high level degrees, decades of experience, ect, then it’s another thing to be so sure of relatively unresearched topics.

The most brilliant people in the world are that way because of the rationalization of how little they actually know.


#7

We are the first researchers to describe and rank the effectiveness of 12 rubber-tubing resistance exercises commonly used by throwers in the bullpen, in the dugout, or on the sidelines to activate the shoulder muscles important for throwing. According to the EMG analyses, performing 7 exercises—external humeral rotation at 90° of abduction, throwing deceleration, shoulder flexion, shoulder extension, low scapular rows, throwing acceleration, and scapular punches—resulted in the most activation of all muscles tested. With these 7 exercises, moderate activation (>20% MVIC) was present in each muscle of the rotator cuff and primary humeral mover and scapular stabilizer muscle groups. The results of this descriptive study will assist clinicians, coaches, and athletes in deciding which exercises may be better suited to include in their rubber-resistance tubing warm-up programs before throwing.

look at this statement
The results of this descriptive study will assist clinicians, coaches, and athletes in deciding which exercises may be better suited to include in their rubber-resistance tubing warm-up programs before throwing.

So they are saying that you should be doing them and these 7 exercises are the best they could find


#8

Tubing is the only way to get your arm prepared to throw a baseball. There is no other way to get the muscles ready to throw at high speed. Also it reduces soreness and recovery time and im proof of it before the tubing I had so many sorearm/injury’s because I dint know how to prepare my arm. But I have done research and have concluded that it does work to keep your arm in shape to throw the baseball at high speeds while reducing the chance of injury.

I have also found that the tubing has helped me gain some more velocity. And throw deeper into the game.


#9

My son has been doing the long toss and tubing work for 5 years now. I think it is great, but I’d be the first to say that a pitcher or other player can loosen up effectively and condition their arm effectively without it. I just think it is a bit easier and a bit safer with the long toss and tubing.