Losing weight increase velocity?


#1

Can losing body fat help increase velocity?


#2

Losing body fat maybe, but probably only if you replace fat with muscle.
Something like this may very from different people, and also it mostlylikely won’t change (unless muslce is gained) unless one has far to much excess weight.

In my honest opinion if your under 20% body fat or so there won’t be substantial gain from LOSING weight.

Pitching is one of those weird positions in sports where someone like David Wells in terrible shape can dominate (he said he was even hungover the day he threw his perfecto). It’s also a spot where someone like little irvin santan (like 6’3" 160 lbs can throw about 96).

Losing body fat is always a good thing, will probably see running speed results, and if replaced by muscle you will see a broad spectrum off results.
It’s definately something to go for! I just don’t know if you will see substantial velocity gain from loss of body fat alone.


#3

Most of the pitchers in the Chicago Cubs organization were encouraged to be around 12 to 16% body fat. 12% being on the lower end, of course; 16% being on the high end. Some guys, like Kyle Farnsworth, a former Cubs pitcher, who’s now with the Yankees, was 4 to 6%. I was 10 to 12%. Most were a little higher.

In some respects, body fat was used as a measure of fitness in the organization, which was why it was taken and monitored on a regular basis. To quick gains, and the trainers would work to get it down. To quick decreases, and you’d likely be placed on a high-calorie diet.


#4

hey steve, would you mind posting what a high calorie diet would consist of?


#5

The things with diets is that they are so individual that it’s difficult to post just one diet, and have it work for everyone here. However, you can do it yourself. Here’s how…

Find out how many calories you expend in a day. Then, find a way to add 500 extra calories to your diet on top of the average, which you expend daily. 3,500 calories equals one pound. So, 500 extra a day X 7 days in a week will give you an additional one pound (3,500 calories) each week.

Gaining weight is just like losing weight in that a one to 1-1/2-pound increase or decrease is healthy. Anything over that, and it’s probably too much, too soon.