Losing muscle mass- Good idea?


#1

Hey guys, do you think it is a good idea to try and lose a little bit of upper body mass? I would like to be a little bit more lean on my top half. I guess you could say my build is sort of like a football player rather than a pitcher, kind of big and bulky. How would you go about losing some of this. I want to continue to add on mass and muscle on my lower body, but just want to slim my upper down a little bit, not lose muscle, but mass. Should i drop my calories some, or change my workouts to more core centered? Right now i am 15 yo and 5ft 8in and 155 lbs. My caloric intake is around 3800-4000 per day(when at home). Not sure about school days, but around 3000-3200. Thanks.


#2

I would have to start out by asking you why mass is so important to you?? I see you want to lose mass in the upper body you have already gained but you still say you want to gain mass in the lower body…

Are you a pitcher?? What type of weight lifting workouts are you doing right now??

If you are doing more conventional lifting such as squats and bench, lifts like this, I would suggest stopping those. I would focus more on full body movements being incorporated into the workout. For example, if you are wanting to do a dumbbell shoulder press you would take a weight that is light enough that you could do a lunge first, then a curl, then to a press…so you are now doing full body movements but still adding in the body part you are trying to workout.

Really it comes down to understanding that your training needs to be specific to what it is your sport demands and you may have to do away with all beach body type lifts…(not saying that you are doing this)

Do you know anything about Kettlebells? This is a great type of workout to incorporate the entire body, focus on stability and mobility while also understanding about rhythm and timing, all of which are incorporated in the pitching motion. I understand this doesn’t help if you have never used KB’s before but maybe you can look into it.


#3

I actually haven’t benched at all in a few years. Now i just do regular push-ups (for my chest). I also do a lot of back exercises such as rows, and scapular work. I do bicep curls, and tricep kickbacks, as well as reverse pull-ups. I do some wrist and forearm work also. So i really don’t think i would call it a beach workout at all. I also have days for med ball, plyo’s, and lower body, so i only workout my upper body every 4 days.
I don’t know anything about kettlebells. What are they?


#4

What’s your height and weight? The only time I think a person should focus on losing mass is if it inhibits flexibility. A guy I play ball with here plays both football and baseball. at 5’8" he weights 205, which is quite a bit for a baseball player. He just focuses on lighter weight during the baseball season and flexibility as much as possible.


#5

Just go to youtube and put in Kettlebell training and see what comes up…if you were serious about starting that type of training just make sure the instructor is an RKC…russian kettlebell certified…but I would bet you would love it and it would definitely keep you lean and supple…this is tough to understand in a short paragraph but the focus of training is on the nervous system, not on a muscle or muscle group…become a professional at moving your joints and you will be right where you need to be in anything you do athletically…think of your workouts as training sessions to move well and master all movements that you perform…focus on mastering movements, not whether you are building muscle…muscle is no good if you can’t tell it how you want it to move…hope I am not being too confusing here…


#6

lmao


#7

how are you worried about being big and bulky if you’re 5’8" 155?


#8

You really don’t decide whether you get lean or bulk muscles. Your genetically inclined to get "lean or “bulk” sized muscles in certain areas of your body, so basically the only true way to change this is to go back in time and change your parents. :stuck_out_tongue:

Now about that Kettleball thing, honestly I think it looks like an injury waiting to happen. The neuromuscular connections layed down in the “kettleball workouts” will not benefit the throwing of a baseball due to the difference in neurological pathways. All this will do is confuse the nervous system.


#9

[quote=“LankyLefty”]how are you worried about being big and bulky if you’re 5’8" 155?[/quote]Agreed, you are far from bulky.


#10

In regards to the comment from TheUndiscovered…

I am not sure what the response LMAO was about but that is ok, sometimes it is ok to not have heard about something before and you can respect other information and maybe read into it before shaking it off as crazy talk…

As for the KB thing…not sure if you knew this but there are many major programs using KB’s as their choice of training…I don’t feel the wanting to get into it here but there really is no carry over in training period no matter what you are doing…you can’t lift weights and be a better pitcher, you have to pitch to be a better pitcher…but what you can do is teach yourself and your nervous system to do things that will get you used to sequencing body parts, being technical and being quick and athletic…for example, when you do a snatch in KB training you are sequencing the body, you must use proper form to move the bell properly, you must be rythmic in your timing and you must be able to be mobile in certain areas of your body as other parts are stabilizing your body…these things should sound very familiar in pitching…if this is true, then this is one way to train to help your nervous system to get used to that type of movement…you can choose anything you want…that is just one way and I, along with a lot of others these days, feel it is a very effective way to train athletes. Of course it doesn’t look like a pitching motion but in no way does it “confuse” the nervous system.


#11

Thanks for your time douglasbryantwhite, i will check out the kettlebell thing, and see what i think. Although many of you don’t seem to think there is a problem, so i may just stick to what i am currently doing.


#12

[quote=“douglasbryantwhite”]In regards to the comment from TheUndiscovered…

I am not sure what the response LMAO was about but that is ok, sometimes it is ok to not have heard about something before and you can respect other information and maybe read into it before shaking it off as crazy talk…

As for the KB thing…not sure if you knew this but there are many major programs using KB’s as their choice of training…I don’t feel the wanting to get into it here but there really is no carry over in training period no matter what you are doing…you can’t lift weights and be a better pitcher, you have to pitch to be a better pitcher…but what you can do is teach yourself and your nervous system to do things that will get you used to sequencing body parts, being technical and being quick and athletic…for example, when you do a snatch in KB training you are sequencing the body, you must use proper form to move the bell properly, you must be rythmic in your timing and you must be able to be mobile in certain areas of your body as other parts are stabilizing your body…these things should sound very familiar in pitching…if this is true, then this is one way to train to help your nervous system to get used to that type of movement…you can choose anything you want…that is just one way and I, along with a lot of others these days, feel it is a very effective way to train athletes. Of course it doesn’t look like a pitching motion but in no way does it “confuse” the nervous system.[/quote]

http://www.drdarden.com/readTopic.do;jsessionid=8156EA634E72E6AA56399B21F7A85965.hydra?id=412352


#13

Just seeing those pictures didn’t make me want to read any further.


#14

Very sophisticated reasoning.