Lose weight


#1

I really need to lose weight this off-season.
Does anybody have experience in this
or any information to share with me on this subject?


#2

I meant to add “Not necessarily” to that poll.
I believe that extra body weight does not help pitching velocity or the ability to hit the ball farther with more power.
Higher pitching velocity and better hitting (more power) is caused by better pitching and hitting mechanics.


#3

[quote=“CardsWin”]I meant to add “Not necessarily” to that poll.
I believe that extra body weight does not help pitching velocity or the ability to hit the ball farther with more power.
Higher pitching velocity and better hitting (more power) is caused by better pitching and hitting mechanics.[/quote]

there is actually a correlation between overall size and throwing velocity and batspeed.

Obviously mechanics play a (HUGE) role, but you are never going to see a 5 foot 100lb kid throwing 95mph. You don’t need to be 6’5" 250lbs to have appreciable power or velocity, but size does play a role, among many other variables.

note that correlation is different from cause and effect. Being big doesn’t cause you to throw hard, but in general those who are bigger will throw harder (on average).


#4

Thanks for the comment!
That’s what I like about this site, everybody can share their own opinion whether they are an expert in baseball or not.


#5

It depends on what you define by weight. Obviously gains in muscle, while maintaining athleticism is likely going to net you some velocity. Losing fat, on the other hand could potentially gain you velocity as well. An unhealthy amount of fat is like deadweight that can slow you down. obviously guys like Sabathia and David Wells got away with it. Just as their are skinny guys like Lincecum and Matt Purke who can throw very hard even without large muscle masses.


#6

Pitching coaches and baseball experts that I have learned from
usually say that most (if not all) of a pitcher’s velocity should come from their lower body (legs, hips, etc.).


#7

Genetics plays the biggest role in Athletics.


#8

Sort of …

While it’s true I could have never been a pro basketball player b/c at 6’3" I didn’t have the “right genetics” (not to mention, I was just plain BAD at hoops), but it’s false to say every kid who’s 6-foot-10 (good genetics for basketball, no doubt!) will be a pro basketball player is totally false.

Yes, genetics gives you the opportunity, and separates people right away. But that’s about it… lots of people have the right genetics and end up being desk jockeys, not NBA players. Genetics alone doesn’t get you really far after some point. What the athlete does with those genetics is entirely determined by the athlete and no one else. Work ethic, drive, attitude, a willingness to out work and out perform the competition – all those things take athletes well beyond genetics.


#9

Sort of …

While it’s true I could have never been a pro basketball player b/c at 6’3" I didn’t have the “right genetics” (not to mention, I was just plain BAD at hoops), but it’s false to say every kid who’s 6-foot-10 (good genetics for basketball, no doubt!) will be a pro basketball player is totally false.

Yes, genetics gives you the opportunity, and separates people right away. But that’s about it… lots of people have the right genetics and end up being desk jockeys, not NBA players. Genetics alone doesn’t get you really far after some point. What the athlete does with those genetics is entirely determined by the athlete and no one else. Work ethic, drive, attitude, a willingness to out work and out perform the competition – all those things take athletes well beyond genetics.[/quote]

I know this firsthand…


#10

palo20-
how do you know this firsthand?


#11

[quote=“CardsWin”]palo20-
how do you know this firsthand?[/quote]

Probably because he’s tall. Comeon RiStar.


#12

No way…
Not even close…hasn’t changed his mechs once yet.


#13

Cut your caloric intake.


#14

No way…
Not even close…hasn’t changed his mechs once yet.[/quote]

for those who are interested, RISTAR has stuck to the same mechanics for well over a year and after talking to him for some time I convinced him to start going to Cressey, who he has now fully bought into and is obsessed with. Just goes to show that people can change.


#15

:bowdown: :bigtup:
All hail Lanky…
Ben you are truely the KC86 of your generation…I can give you no bigger compliment.
I stand in awe of the master.

I note the term obsessed…So RiStar is still RiStar…but hey maybe Md. has a great psycho-analysis school too… :wink:
Or maybe you can go hang with CF up at Johns Hopkins.


#16

[quote=“jdfromfla”]:bowdown: :bigtup:
All hail Lanky…
Ben you are truely the KC86 of your generation…I can give you no bigger compliment.
I stand in awe of the master.

I note the term obsessed…So RiStar is still RiStar…but hey maybe Md. has a great psycho-analysis school too… :wink:
Or maybe you can go hang with CF up at Johns Hopkins.[/quote]

yeah I’m in touch with both of them. RiStar’s the same kid, just matured and settled into what he has found to work for him. CF seems to be doing pretty well too from everything I’ve heard.

thanks for the kind words JD


#17

Who’s Comeon RiStar?
:?: :?: :?: :?:


#18

Memo to CardsWin: As usual, you’re smack-dab on target.
I don’t know whether I ever told you this, but when I was a kid I would go to Yankee Stadium—the original ballpark—every chance I got, and I would watch the pitchers. I noticed that the Big Three rotation—Allie Reynolds, Vic Raschi and Ed Lopat—were all doing the same thing: they were driving off the lower half of the body, using the legs, the hips and the torso in one continuous (and, it seemed to me, seamless) motion, and that was how they were getting the power behind their pitches—even Lopat, who most definitely was not a fireballer. I watched them closely and saw just how they were doing this, and I made a note of it and started working on this on my own.
As I practiced this essential—and believe it, it is essential—aspect of good mechanics, I found that not only was I getting more power into my pitches, snake-jazzer that I was, I was also throwing harder—and faster—with less effort, and my sidearm delivery seemed to get more snap and sizzle. I call this “The Secret”, and if more pitchers were to pick up on this they would experience the same results—and not a sore arm or a sore shoulder or a sore anything else into the bargain!
You probably had, or have, a very wise pitching coach who, among other things, would take the time to explore what might work for you and then work with you to help you make the most of what you have and can do. Like the one I had. :slight_smile: 8)


#19

Zita Carno-
What level of baseball did you play?
The Yankees have had some really great pitchers
throughout the years.


#20

Did they ever!
As to what level I played at, I would have to say it was major league. The team I played with was a very good one that would have been called semipro if we had gotten paid. Our manager was a former semipro infielder (second base) with good baseball savvy, and we played major league rules all the way, which pleased me very much. And after meeting Ed Lopat, my pitching ramped up several notches—what I learned from him was nothing short of priceless, and it didn’t matter that I didn’t have a fast ball to speak of. I had a whole closetful of breaking pitches and the control and command to go with them. I played until I was well into my thirties and then I had to stop when my work schedule caught up with me and I lost my free weekends—but while I played I had fun and won more than my share of games, not to mention rescuing more than my share in the late innings! :slight_smile: 8)