Looking for some advices on my motion of pitch [modified]

First of all…Since I’m not an native English speaker, please forgive me for misusing some term in this article. The video and motion clips are following.

Side View
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Front View
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If these pictures are too small for you to see, please visit this site.

My questions are:

I think that my pitching mechanic can be categorized into tall-and-fall. However, I’m wondering if I can take advantage of power supply from pitch-arm-side foot’s pushing out from the plate? Does my body move forward too early?

My lower body is not so steady when glove-side-foot´s landing. How can I correct this?

Shoulder and heap separation is not always good on my pitching mechanic. How do I keep it consistency.

The last question is about the standing position on the plate. According to my motion of pitch, is there any suggestion on my standing position on the plate where I can get more benefit? In general, I often stand on the left-front corner of the plate. Beside fastball, I have a slider-like curve ball, and my fast ball is not slow in my amateur league level. As you can see, I’m a R.H.P.

Any other advices and opinions, no matter encouragement or criticism…even one-line comment, will be fully appreciated!! (Grammar and article structures too~ lol )

Thank you!

Leno Lin

I think it’s kind of hard to analyze my mechanic, isn’t it? lol
Well, I ask some friends of mine, they all told me that the biggest problem of my pitch is my stride. Moreover, it may also lead to my control problem.

By the way, I also review some articles on this forum, and I find that you guys in US are soooo~ strong!! No wonder you guys can easily pitch a 80mph up fast ball… I even see a guy who can pitch 88mph at max, and kids can easily pitch a nearly 80mph… OMG, they are still growing! My max speed is at 82mph, and get an average about 76-80mph in game. It’s not slow in our league, amateur one. In Taiwan, my country, the normal max speed for a decent players without regular professional training in childhood is around 120km/hr(75mph), and some talent player can reach about 130km/hr(81-82mph).

So… It’s good to discovery this for me to pursue further pitching skills, it’s the greatest fun I get from baseball.

Leno Lin

Your form is good and proportional with your height and your progress moving forward with your body in motion is good. In fact, it appears that you’ve had some coaching.

I would suggest during your first movement of your glove … to change FROM draping the glove downward infront of your chest and LEAVING IT THERE while you move forward to pitch … instead, as you stretch your stride leg out, follow with your glove hand by extending your arm along the same line as your stride leg… but remember to keep your glove on the inside of your stride leg’s knee… then move your body to your glove.

Maintain the same body and pitching arm motion, in addition to what I suggested above.

You have excellent stride leg discipline and control and your release and pitching arm follow through is good.

If you have a coach, let him read this suggestion and discuss it with him. Then try it at 1/3 game speed (slow) and increase the delivery a little faster. For example the first 30 pitches slow, then the next 30 pitches a little faster, then the next 30 pitches a little faster.

Please post back on this site how you did.

Coach B.

[quote=“Coach Baker”]Your form is good and proportional with your height and your progress moving forward with your body in motion is good. In fact, it appears that you’ve had some coaching.

I would suggest during your first movement of your glove … to change FROM draping the glove downward infront of your chest and LEAVING IT THERE while you move forward to pitch … instead, as you stretch your stride leg out, follow with your glove hand by extending your arm along the same line as your stride leg… but remember to keep your glove on the inside of your stride leg’s knee… then move your body to your glove.

Maintain the same body and pitching arm motion, in addition to what I suggested above.

You have excellent stride leg discipline and control and your release and pitching arm follow through is good.

If you have a coach, let him read this suggestion and discuss it with him. Then try it at 1/3 game speed (slow) and increase the delivery a little faster. For example the first 30 pitches slow, then the next 30 pitches a little faster, then the next 30 pitches a little faster.

Please post back on this site how you did.

Coach B.[/quote]

Hi, Coach Baker.
Thanks for your reply, but I have some questions about your suggestion.
The purpose why I leave my glove arm while I move forward to pitch is trying to keep my upper body closed. In fact, before I learned how to close my upper body, I did extend my glove arm with my stride leg.

This link is my motion clips when I still pitched with upper body open. Not so good, isn’t it?

So, its the reason why I don’t quite understand your suggestion about extending glove arm along with stride leg. I just tried a few fake pitch in the air. I don’t get the way how to close my body with a extended glove arm. Though I also conscious that you had mentioned keeping glove on the inside of the stride leg’s knee, it’s still hard to feel the power from my hip rotation.

Furthermore, what is the purpose to do this? Helping control or preventing back hurts? Well, I do have some pain on my left back near my upper spines. I think it may caused by leaving my glove arm while stride forward.

According to your reply, you comment that I have “excellent stride leg discipline,” but I think my stride is not so stable after landing. I don’t know. Or… do I misunderstand your comment… lol

After all, I do not have any coach, honestly. If I do, they are all professional pitchers I like and their motion clips over the internet and of course, some experts like you guys in the forums.

Thanks again~

Somehow I missed a critical part of reviewing your request for advice with the following:

Had I known, my suggestions to you would have been entirely different. If you have PAIN in that area of your body, you’re gambling with a potential life long problem that WILL NOT go away.

Before you go any further… here or anywhere else for that matter, you must … I REPEAT MUST, be examined by a pediatrician (if your still consider a candidate for that age.) Or a doctor that specializes in the spine.

I’ve had pitchers in their mid twenties who have walked onto my field with all kinds of secret aliments and for some unknown reason they’ve nursed these problems for years. What’s really a heartbreaker is to watch a young man go from level to level of competition — then get a real shot at making it professionally or even semiprofessionally only to be turned away due to a disability in the making. I’ve seen my fair share of these situations and it’s nothing that I recommend for anyone – coach or player.

Coach B.

And Lin, this is one reason you may not be able to increase velocity and possibly the cause of the instability you refer to.
As our Coach Baker says, you must be physically sound in order to get to your potential. We here on this site always, without exception, need injured posters to be healed before we can help you perform better (If we can).
Be aggressive, get treated and return, we are very happy to have you participate and to learn of our art in far away places.

Firstly, I have to say that your emphasis on healthy body of athlete really impresses me, and you do make me pay attention on my injure. I’ll search for healing soon.

Indeed, without physical sound body, players cannot absorb any advice. This really touches my deep heart. Due to some environment and system defects, a lot of talent young pitchers in Taiwan still have been ordered to pitch when they’ve already gotten tired or even get hurt! The most famous cases must be Kuo, a 5th starter on active duty in LA Dodger. Other cases like Tsao (3A in Royals farm system), Cheng (1A in Blue Jays’), even like the most successful Taiwan player Chen-Ming Wang all have serious or minor injury history. Of course, countless unnamed players who have no luck to continue their professional career. Kind of sad, isn’t it? If I could have a wish to our baseball culture, it must be one with correct concepts about players’ healthy care. Yeah, It’s not easy to change this situation in an environment that “needs” student team to win to get notice. Well, I hope this wish may come true eventually.

Back to the topic of me… lol
I’ll post back the diagnosis by my doctor. I may need your suggestion furthermore.
Thanks a lot~~

Could you please tell us a little about yourself:

--------------CURRENTLY-----TWO YEARS AGO-------- FIVE YEARS AGO
Age…
Height…
Weight…

General description of your baseball playing experience (any).
Injuries outside of baseball.
How did you get involved in baseball at first - age, level of play, etc.?
Has ANYONE shown you how to pitch? Any instruction at all. If so what
was their qualifications … if any. And at what age were you?
When you watch a professional pitcher, what are you looking for… and
be specific and detail here. (legs, arm movement, body control, etc.)
What are you planning for in baseball … general fun, a college team, a professional team?

Coach B.

Sure, I’m 5’10’’ in height and 150lb. in weight. 28 years old.

I start playing baseball from the first year in college. But most of the time, I didn’t join any team and didn’t have regular training. I just learn how to pitch by imitating professional players’ mechanics, try and error. Before I actually joined a baseball team, I also play softball in graduate school. When my general skills reach certain level, I try to join the college baseball team in my graduate school, but due to the heavy load of my master thesis I just keep in there for about one semester. After that, I have joined two amateur baseball team which play in local community amateur league. Currently, I’m in one of them.

So… summarize in one words, I’m a totally amateur player. In fact, I’m a software engineer in CG animation. Playing baseball is totally for fun. Well, I think it’s all about me, and … nice to meet you~ lol