Longevity and Endurance

One of the main reasons for addressing your pitching skills with reasonable form (mechanics) is not only for a safe and structured performance rhythm, but for it’s also for longevity and endurance.

Think of it this way – for a pitch count range that can go from 75 to 95 pitches during an appearance, and even 30 or more pitches just in one inning when things are not going your way, can be a daunting task. And what adds to the experience is the nature of the performance which is composured of explosive physical demands – over and over again.

Now in the professional game your given expert attention and notice how and when you’re going to perform. Well, most of the time anyway. In the amateur game – your guess is as good as mine.

So, structure your learning curve with a style and rhythm that “fits”, and takes advantage of your natural abilities, and most importantly – KNOW YOUR LIMITS. When it’s time to pull the plug – do it! Don’t perform hurt or in discomfort. Listen to your body when it’s trying to tell you things. And here’s a sobering though – if you have to ask … “What is it exactly that I’m look for?”, it’s time to sit down and ask yourself that question right now. And it’s simpler than you think So, if your planning on going nine innings with nothing but serious cheese, you’d better have a frame, muscle tolerance and endurance that can produce that kind of outing. On the other hand, if your pitch inventory mixes the strain on your body with other than heat – now you’re talking a more reasonable pace.

One of the best parallels that I can draw here is the strategy used by track and field athletes that run the four forty yard event. Four hundred and forty yards is a grueling race that has to be planned well in advance by a runner. And as such, if the runner starts off with an all-out sprint, full steam from the starting blocks there won’t be much left to finish the race. On the other hand, if the runner only jogs out of the starting blocks the distance that has to be made up to catch the other runners will be just too overwhelming. A pace that settles somewhere in between that fits the runner’s ability and the course set ahead, is the only way to go.

Now in the example above, if all runners had the same ability they’d all
have the same pace and would finish the race all at the same time –theoretically. But every runner, like every pitcher, based on age and ability has to pace one’s self differently. Each requiring a different pace using all the available assets at his or her disposal.

So, while going through your off season period, consider what would customize your game skills best and how to use them. Pitch and perform to your ability, not to someone else.

Coach B.

re: “…while going through your off season period, consider what would customize your game skills best …”

Nice post, Coach B. If you haven’t already done so, would you mind offering your specific suggestions for off-season conditioning/skill training routines?

My 14 yo son has over the past ~1 1/2 started working during the off-season on a few conditioning items: Posterior shoulder musculature, triceps, leg strength/endurance, light weights for biceps.

And a few skill training drills: Hip/shoulder separation and delayed shoulder rotation, light toss, etc.

I’d be interested to hear from your perspective what you’d generally like High School pitchers to do over the off-season.

laflippin
If you haven’t already done so, would you mind offering your specific suggestions for off-season conditioning/skill training routines?

I’ve responded to this request in a section called “Workouts”. I titled my remarks …Off Season Considerations….

Now a lot of my experience in this area has been supported by a lot of resources that the high school player and his school’s program may not compliment, but, nevertheless I hope my response will assist your son’s baseball experience.

The main point that I tried to bring accross is that the Off Season is a time for refitting and relaxing. And although some youngsters take a head long approach in participating in other sport programs like football, baseketball,wrestling, gymnastics, volleyball and the like, the single sport player that focuses on pitching is unique in so many ways … hence, by definition the off season is not only an important time line in his career path, but it also supports his training cycle that enhances his performance(s) year after year.

Coach B.