Longer stride?


#1

Ok everyone says a longer stride equals more velocity. But for me it slows me down alot. Whem i try taking a longer stride it feels like everything is slower in terms of motion and it doesnt allow me to explode. If im going for max velo i my normal stride (maybe sometimes shorter) and get all my movements faster.


#2

This is a myth.

Overstriding can certainly cost you velocity by limiting how much your hips can rotate.

A shoter stride will also raqise your release point (which is a good thing).


#3

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]Overstriding can certainly cost you velocity by limiting how much your hips can rotate.

A shoter stride will also raqise your release point (which is a good thing).[/quote]
A shorter stride can reduce hip and shoulder separation and delayed shoulder rotation because you don’t have the proper timing to do those things well. That’s a bad thing. So, some where between too long and too short is a stride length that is proper for you. The trick is to figure that out. A good pitching instructor can help.


#4

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]Overstriding can certainly cost you velocity by limiting how much your hips can rotate.[/quote]Yes, if you actually do “OVERstride”, whatever that might be.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]A shoter stride will also raise your release point (which is a good thing).[/quote]My opinion is that raising your release point is a non-issue. Any perceived benefits you may come up with will be marginal at best. I mean virtually non-existent. There are just SO MANY other things that give so much more “bang for the buck” in comparison with raising the release point.

Actually, I’d say that your attempts to raise the release point by shortening your stride (if you’re not overstriding), will severely reduce your overall potential to generate velocity by shortening the time you have to generate forward centre of gravity momentum, which is a major component of overall velocity generation. Understriding is your real enemy here folks, not overstriding.

DON’T SHORTEN YOUR STRIDE, unless it’s so incredibly long that it does actually inhibit your hip rotation. A long stride is almost useless if there’s no generation of forward c.o.g. momentum BUT combine it with good toward the plate movement, sideways, and you’ll be hard pressed to overstride and your hip rotation will be fine.

Guys. LOOK AT VIDEO OF MLB PITCHERS AND THEIR STRIDE LENGTHS. Did Nolan Ryan inhibit his hips with his long stride? Did Roger Clemens inhibit his hip rotation with his long stride? Wagner? Rivera? Brown? Beckett? Shall I list more? Anybody want these videos?

DON’T BLINDLY SHORTEN YOUR STRIDE!!! Especially not to "raise your release point!! Futile and unproductive.


#5

[quote=“dm59”][quote=“Chris O’Leary”]Overstriding can certainly cost you velocity by limiting how much your hips can rotate.[/quote]Yes, if you actually do “OVERstride”, whatever that might be.

[quote=“Chris O’Leary”]A shoter stride will also raise your release point (which is a good thing).[/quote]My opinion is that raising your release point is a non-issue. Any perceived benefits you may come up with will be marginal at best. I mean virtually non-existent. There are just SO MANY other things that give so much more “bang for the buck” in comparison with raising the release point.

Actually, I’d say that your attempts to raise the release point by shortening your stride (if you’re not overstriding), will severely reduce your overall potential to generate velocity by shortening the time you have to generate forward centre of gravity momentum, which is a major component of overall velocity generation. Understriding is your real enemy here folks, not overstriding.

DON’T SHORTEN YOUR STRIDE, unless it’s so incredibly long that it does actually inhibit your hip rotation. A long stride is almost useless if there’s no generation of forward c.o.g. momentum BUT combine it with good toward the plate movement, sideways, and you’ll be hard pressed to overstride and your hip rotation will be fine.

Guys. LOOK AT VIDEO OF MLB PITCHERS AND THEIR STRIDE LENGTHS. Did Nolan Ryan inhibit his hips with his long stride? Did Roger Clemens inhibit his hip rotation with his long stride? Wagner? Rivera? Brown? Beckett? Shall I list more? Anybody want these videos?

DON’T BLINDLY SHORTEN YOUR STRIDE!!! Especially not to "raise your release point!! Futile and unproductive.[/quote]
Excellent! I couldn’t have said it better.


#6

Then why is raising the mound universally seen as a way to shift the balance of power in the pitcher’s favor?


#7

The mound is 6" high, giving some vertical drop to build up momentum in addition to the horizontal component of the stride. Gravity helps here. Also, there is benefit in having a downward trajectory to the target. In a 1" = 1’-0" slope, how much benefit are you going to get out of shortening the stride compared to the detriment of reducing the potential for horizontal c.o.g. momentum? Raising the release point in this manner will provide very little, if any benefit at all.

My point being that we need to look at this in terms of a cost / benefit analysis. Shortening the stride = little, if any, benefit vs. longer stride (well done) = more c.o.g. momentum and potential for back leg contribution. Too much cost, too little benefit.

Oh, and thanks Roger.