Long Toss Length


#1

How much is the the length of the throw in long toss important? If one is able to throw farther than the other does it matter? does it translate onto the mound? For example is the one who can long toss the farthest usually have the best velocity on the mound?


#2

okay first and foremost i think that it is important how far you throw.

Even when you are long tossing it translates into the mound.

When i long toss i use my hips and get a good crop hop and make sure i follow through and use my whole body. I can throw 330ft with one bounce which is pretty good. I also topped out at 86mph. Anyways i am pretty sure that people said 330ft equals 90mph. I am pretty close since i am one hop bouncing it. Anyways enough of me. Just trying to show you that long toss does matter to translate into good pitching.

Also for the people who say " i know a kid who can throw 90mph but can’t long toss over 250ft. But you can throw lets say 270ft and you only throw 80mph. The difference is maybe that this kid is throwing more on a line and throwing a bullet compared to someone who is just rainbowing it in the air. Even with a little wind if you get the ball in the air it will really go.

So ya i really thing that how far you throw does translate into your pitching velocity.

Also i would highly doubt that you would see a finest pitcher who throws about 80mph at the college level or something out long toss a flamethrower pitcher who throws like 95mph. It just is not going to happen.


#3

anyone else?


#4

I have done long-toss programs where most of my throws were over 120 feet and I have done programs (Woolforth’s Combat Pitching) that after every five throws that hit a certain spot - I move back two steps. This program took me out to about 250 feet pretty consistently (you had to hit a certain spot and couldn’t just chuck the ball as hard as you could). I tried to keep the ball on a straight line.

I like the first program better. It didn’t seem to mess up my mechanics as much. Woolforth’s program - caused me to tilt my front shoulder upward and I took this to the mound with me. I had to work through this early in the Spring. I guess the way around this would be to have a pretty focused pull down phase at the end of the your long toss.


#5

[quote=“baseballkid111”]okay first and foremost i think that it is important how far you throw.

Even when you are long tossing it translates into the mound.

When i long toss i use my hips and get a good crop hop and make sure i follow through and use my whole body. I can throw 330ft with one bounce which is pretty good. I also topped out at 86mph. Anyways i am pretty sure that people said 330ft equals 90mph. I am pretty close since i am one hop bouncing it. Anyways enough of me. Just trying to show you that long toss does matter to translate into good pitching.

Also for the people who say " i know a kid who can throw 90mph but can’t long toss over 250ft. But you can throw lets say 270ft and you only throw 80mph. The difference is maybe that this kid is throwing more on a line and throwing a bullet compared to someone who is just rainbowing it in the air. Even with a little wind if you get the ball in the air it will really go.

So ya i really thing that how far you throw does translate into your pitching velocity.

Also i would highly doubt that you would see a finest pitcher who throws about 80mph at the college level or something out long toss a flamethrower pitcher who throws like 95mph. It just is not going to happen.[/quote]

You throwing 330, is that a bullet or just throwing straight for distance