Long toss conversion

does anyone know the conversion for long toss feet to velocity? I know it has been put ona thread before but i just cant find it thanks

working from memory:
70 mph = 210 ft.
80 mph = 260 ft.
90 mph = 305 ft.

What angles do they assume?

[quote=“CADad”]working from memory:
70 mph = 210 ft.
80 mph = 260 ft.
90 mph = 305 ft.[/quote]

This is interesting. I’ve never seen or heard this before. Thanks for posting. I’m assuming these distances are throws on a line with no hops.

I’d be careful with thinking that these values will transfer to “pitching” speeds, where you do not have a crow hop, are on a mound and are attempting to hit a very specific target.

No, not on a line. These are for throwing your maximum distance which requires throwing at about 30 to 35 degrees. That’s a pretty high arc.

How does long toss transfer to MPH.

To find an estimate All i need to do is throw a ball from a crow hop at 35* and follow this chart. And i can have an estimate for my MPh

working from memory:
70 mph = 210 ft.
80 mph = 260 ft.
90 mph = 305 ft.

I threw today and maxed out on two throws just to see were my arm was at and lanched them 280ft(close est give or take a few feet) so I guess that would put me at around 85mph maybe? I dont know is this right?

As long as it was 280’ on the fly and you measured from where you released the ball, not from where you started to crow hop then it would be equivalent to somewhere around 84 mph.

I have a q’s so is this absolute estimate if i do this to try to find My MPH? How accurate would it really be?

I’m not sure what value there is in these conversions. So you find that, while long tossing, you throw 90 mph. That does not necessarily mean that you will “pitch” at 90 mph. These are two different activities, throwing and pitching. Once you get on a mound, pitching to a small target, downhill, you are not guaranteed that the velo you had “throwing” on flat ground, with a crow hop, at a broader target will show up.

RIStar,
It is just going to give you a ballpark estimate. It also can tell you if there’s possibly a problem with your mechanics that’s limiting your pitching velocity. For example, if you are long tossing 280’ and your max velocity off the mound is 75 mph then you are probably doing something wrong when throwing off the mound. Conversely, If your max velocity off the mound is 85 mph and you can only long toss 240’ then you are probably doing something wrong when long tossing.

The other thing you have to pay attention to is wind direction. If you are throwing with a breeze or against the breeze it is going to affect the distance you can throw.

[quote=“CADad”]… if you are long tossing 280’ and your max velocity off the mound is 75 mph then you are probably doing something wrong when throwing off the mound.[/quote]…but what’s the connection between the conversion for long toss and actual pitching velo? My guess is that there is none, given the differences and variables involved.

The connection is that people who are able to throw a longer distance are usually able to throw faster pitches and as long as there’s nothing particularly wrong with their mechanics the velocities tend to match. Once you are throwing a ball at the angle which allows maximum distance the only way to throw it a longer distance is to throw the ball faster so the two are quite closely correlated in most cases.

My son’s maximum throwing distance and max velocity off the mound have always correlated well. I just talked to another pitcher from his school the other day and he was telling me what his maximum throwing distance was and it was about 305’. He maxes out at 90 mph. It tends to work.

I’ve seen the results from numerous players at Jaeger’s camp and the correlation seems to work out far more often than not.