Long time, no post! New mechanics

Hey Guys,
It’s been a while since my last post on here, but I have been working vry hard on the field and in the weight room. Season opened up last night and i have about two minutes worth of video to show for it. If you could look it over, id really appreciate it.

Thanks in Advance,
The Bear (new nickname i picked up this season? haha)

Here are my new, improved mechanics 2/19/08:
Link
http://video.berecruited.com/videos/athletes/150127/97376086

And, in comparison, here are my old mechanics from last summer’s legion season 7/16/07:

[/url][/b]

looks like you go into rotation early and release the ball even before you get full rotation of your hips and trunk if that makes sense. i know that sounds strange but that’s what i see when i slow it down.

if you are looking for velocity, if you can delay your rotation and then throw the ball after that later rotation, it should help your velocity. it might be a little late to do that now but something to try in the bullpen or off-season.

nice tilt when you throw.

I didn’t have time to do a thorough analysis but one thing I did notice is that you seem predictable with runners on base. You take one look at the runner and then you go home just about every time it seems. That is unless the camera only caught those pitches where you did this.

You need to mix it up - differ the number of looks at the runner, pause for different amounts of time, step off sometimes, etc.

Roger, thanks for the feedback :). That is an easy fix. I just completely overlooked it. I did go six innings and thats only like 20 or so pitches im guessing, but I dont remember ever thinking about how many times I look over, so I’ll definately keep that in mind during my next start!

And, Dusty Delso, are you saying that my hips are rotating too early, and that I need to keep my hips closed longer during my stride? If that is what you mean, then I totally understand you, and have actually been told that by my pitching coach. It’s just one of those things that is hard to work on during the season, but I can definately try to work on that during bullpen.

Thanks for all the help :slight_smile:
Anyone have any other feedback?

Hello, on one of the pitches in the video, you were at a 45 degree angle, on one of the others, you were horizontal. That’s what you should be at everytime, HORIZONTAL!!! Throw the ball toward the catcher, streching your hand out toward the catcher, snap off the pitch, complete the pitch, by slapping your knee. Get HORIZONTAL!!! Other than that GREAT!!

Oh wow, another thing I somehow manage to have overlooked. I see it now that you’ve told me. Im upright in my followthrough in most of the pitches. Especially from the stretch. I can definately fix that!
Thanks! :slight_smile:

I’m guessing you’re around 80 mph? you don’t look like you’re throwing your hardest in that clip, although the timing of everything is very good. I think you would benefit maybe a little bit from something like a weighted ball program to help teach you to really unload on the ball. I like the mechanics, but either you’re not throwing your hardest, or you’re not explosive enough. I don’t think you need to worry too much though, you probably have good control judging from your mechanics, and I’m sure your velocity is at least average. Overall, good work, keep it up.

PDF,

You’re the definition of a one-trick pony.

looks pretty fluid but when your coming to land your body is pretty far forward. meaning your coming forward with to much weight your not staying back. so when you land that why you over rotate and if you stay back a lil longer you could gain some velocity because everything else looks pretty good

PDF,

You’re the definition of a one-trick pony.[/quote]

:lol:

I didn’t have the heart to say it

One thing that stands out in my mind is how your front foot looks at foot plant. Take a look yourself. Are you landing on your heel? Do your toes ever touch the ground before release?

Your stride looks pretty abbreviated, though if that works for you, so be it. But landing too heavily on your heel seems to be robbing you of velo and limits your ability to field come-backers (as witnessed on the slow roller to second where your infielder had to try an heroic glove-toss to first), in my opinion.

The Hose

[quote=“hoseman18”]One thing that stands out in my mind is how your front foot looks at foot plant. Take a look yourself. Are you landing on your heel? Do your toes ever touch the ground before release?

Your stride looks pretty abbreviated, though if that works for you, so be it. But landing too heavily on your heel seems to be robbing you of velo and limits your ability to field come-backers (as witnessed on the slow roller to second where your infielder had to try an heroic glove-toss to first), in my opinion.

The Hose[/quote]

Haha, you hit the hammer on the head with the slow roller that my 2nd baseman dove for (unfortunately he didnt make the play). But, I see, so maybe elongating my stride should lead to me landing “lighter” on my foot and less on the heel? Would that help with the problems the others above found (for example: early rotation)?
Thanks for the help guys! :slight_smile:

[quote=“SP1B”]

so maybe elongating my stride should lead to me landing “lighter” on my foot and less on the heel? Would that help with the problems the others above found (for example: early rotation)?
Thanks for the help guys! :)[/quote]

Yes, a longer stride should delay your hip rotation. Try to keep your front hip pointing to home as long as possible and only turn your foot to home as your foot is about to strike dirt. Keep in mind, changing something like your stride or changing the duration and timing of hip/shoulder rotation will mess up the timing of your entire motion. A longer stride won’t necessarily benefit anything without a conscious effort to delay the shoulder rotation until your hips are in several degrees of rotation already. Again, this can really screw up your timing, so get a coach you trust to work with you or you could be riding pine while you work out the kinks (in self-taught lessons, the student is only as good as the teacher 8) )

I always hesitate to give too much advice this close to the season because this time should be used to perfect those things you already do well, to polish up your act so to speak so that you have the best chance of success. The time to be making big changes in your mechanics is in the winter off-season, so proceed with caution and don’t try to change too much too soon.

Good luck, and have fun. It’s a GAME! :smiley:

The Hose