Lil woggy freshman

Some of his mechanics aren’t always the same, I notice in the video MVI7441 that the last pitch has a much flatter back than the other pitches, so my first advice would be “repeatable” mechanics!

I noticed the third pitch was different as well might have been a hook.that was his first day back after the flu so i could tell he was struggling.a curve ball shortens up more and the finish is more down and left for a righty.

That is my point, gotta keep all the pitches looking the same, don’t want to tip off the pitch from the action.

remember you are looking at a video tape NOT facing him in the batters box…you cannot complete a curveball and have it the same as a fastball UNLESS you want your arm to fall off.tipping pitches comes BEFORE the release.If you are looking at his followthrough thinking you know what hes throwing you’ll never ever see the ball release…

I see a difference from the end of the hand break in the video, I disagree that through release that curve needs to look different than a fastball, at least in the video I notice an definate arm path difference and not just at the end after release.

you never said through release.the fact is you cant finish a curve ball the way you do a fastball.I’m not here to nitpick this stuff.I have no idea what he threw and sometimes he will change arm slots.What i’m looking for is over rotation and opening up the front side too soon.The reason I say that is because he throws approximately the same speed with a slide step than he does winding up.that tells me he isnt using his body to an advantage when he has the opportunity.thats the reason I included the other clips especially the down look video.Thanks again.

If you already know what you are looking for then what are you looking for here, if your focus is specifically on opening front side too soon then I don’t think many here can help you since your focus is too narrow.

I guess you cant help,thanks anyway

You are correct that the over-rotating during his wind-up is an issue; I realize there are many successful pitchers who do it but that doesn’t mean it is mechanically advantageous - because it isn’t; it can lead to timing problems and it usually means the pitcher swings the leg into landing instead of driving directly to the target.

In this case, the stretch is better because the arm actually gets up into the high cocked position a tad later compared to the wind-up. He can resolve this issue in the wind-up by either holding on to the ball longer in the glove (later hand break) or by dangling his arm down by his side ala Lincecum and Sabbathia.

But the biggest velocity killer that jumps out at me is the front leg: notice how his knee is over his ankle at landing and then it continues to drift a bit forward. He needs to get his front foot out in front of his knee and then firm up the entire leg and brace it hard. As it is, he is losing a lot of energy that should be transferred to the upper body here.

I would suggest he work at driving the back leg so that he gets longer and lower - he is a bit too upright at landing (either flexibility issues or just poor use of the back leg). He does a great job of staying sideways and getting his back leg to extend before hip rotation (notice how his back knee stays sideways instead of turning down, which is what a lot of youth pitchers do), but he just needs to get out further. This will probably help the front leg issue, but he should be mindful of getting that front foot out in front of the knee at landing. Getting longer and lower should also help to keep both feet on the ground - as it is, he is most often throwing off of one foot.

[quote=“structuredoc”]You are correct that the over-rotating during his wind-up is an issue; I realize there are many successful pitchers who do it but that doesn’t mean it is mechanically advantageous - because it isn’t; it can lead to timing problems and it usually means the pitcher swings the leg into landing instead of driving directly to the target.

In this case, the stretch is better because the arm actually gets up into the high cocked position a tad later compared to the wind-up. He can resolve this issue in the wind-up by either holding on to the ball longer in the glove (later hand break) or by dangling his arm down by his side ala Lincecum and Sabbathia.

But the biggest velocity killer that jumps out at me is the front leg: notice how his knee is over his ankle at landing and then it continues to drift a bit forward. He needs to get his front foot out in front of his knee and then firm up the entire leg and brace it hard. As it is, he is losing a lot of energy that should be transferred to the upper body here.

I would suggest he work at driving the back leg so that he gets longer and lower - he is a bit too upright at landing (either flexibility issues or just poor use of the back leg). He does a great job of staying sideways and getting his back leg to extend before hip rotation (notice how his back knee stays sideways instead of turning down, which is what a lot of youth pitchers do), but he just needs to get out further. This will probably help the front leg issue, but he should be mindful of getting that front foot out in front of the knee at landing. Getting longer and lower should also help to keep both feet on the ground - as it is, he is most often throwing off of one foot.[/quote]

thank you for the helpful feedback