Lightweight fireballers

i read alot about people wondering how important weight is for gaining velocity. i was even wondering this myself a while ago so i thought id post a couple videos i found on youtube on a couple prospects. they throw hard but arnt to heavy…enjoy



Those are great videos. Thanks. I’ve saved the last 2 for my son to watch how these guys throw. We’re new to baseball…it’s only his 2nd year playing hardball. So, about the height and weight thing: I guess, in most cases, the bigger the kid, the harder they usually throw? I can’t really tell how big the guys are in the videos but, boy, they are fast!!! Our son, Brett, is 12 (he’ll be 13 in July) and is already 6 ft tall and just under 160lbs. Dad is just over 6’4 so we’re told that Brett will likely be about 2-3 inches taller than that. Right now his fastest throw is 74mph. My question is, if he continues training over the next few years, how much speed is typically added just from growing? Thanks.

hard to say. most likley get into 80s pretty easily but its more about learning how to throw over those years. the more he throws the better he gets, when he matures he’ll usually throw a lil harder but in the end its all about mechanics

Great! Thanks for answering. Some of this stuff is so confusing to newbies like us!

with aaron crow… look at his right arm at :27 his fingers ar facing down, then at :28 his hand is up…

is that normal, and will it increase speed, and how does he rotate it that quickly without doing damage in the long run

The reason scouts put emphasis on size is the ability to take the beating that pitchers do. Not saying that smaller guys are any less strong, its just easier for a larger frame to take the punishment of pitching.

Aaron Crow and Jacobson wouldn’t be considered “undersized”

Usually undersized righties are 5’10-5’11 and usually these guys only get picked up if they throw so serious heat.

It’s about projectability more than wear n tear.

Ye im not sure how weight effects it but im 125 pounds at 5’11 and I have one of the better arms in my class.

[quote=“TheOleOneBall”]Aaron Crow and Jacobson wouldn’t be considered “undersized”

Usually undersized righties are 5’10-5’11 and usually these guys only get picked up if they throw so serious heat.

It’s about projectability more than wear n tear.[/quote]

eh i dont consider em undersized per say but def not the normal 220 6’4 flamethrower you see normally

It is all mechanics and flexibility.

I’m 6’0 160lbs, can’t bench squat, and I can hit high 80s.

Mind you if I was 6’6 240lbs, I’d probably hit 110 :wink:

Not only that but it’s easier to throw faster from a taller frame. Think about getting hit by a short belt and then getting hit by a longer belt (sort of a cruel example :P). You can generate the same hand speed for both but the longer belt will hurt a lot more.

I can’t find the statistical evidence saying this is true. If you look arounds the pros and count the true horses (IMO throw 120+ pitches on any given day), you’ll have your big guys who are Randy Johnson (in his prime), Roy Halladay, CC Sabathia, and you’ll have your little guys who are Johan Santana, Lincecum and at 6’2 190 lbs I guess I’ll throw Grienke in there. I mean you see in the NBA all the time, the little guys have more endurance and stamina. I would think that your theory is, if anything, contrary to the truth. Blood flow travels longer distances in larger bodies and cuts off the limbs first meaning blood travels there last. The point is, bad mechanics are bad mechanics. It doesn’t matter how big or little you are, you have to throw the proper way, just like you have to bench press a proper way and squat and etc. The problem is distinguishing the bad mechanics from the good ones.

[quote=“Lights Out”]It is all mechanics and flexibility.

I’m 6’0 160lbs, can’t bench squat, and I can hit high 80s.

Mind you if I was 6’6 240lbs, I’d probably hit 110 :wink:[/quote]
canadian in so cal?

where did you play in canada?

it should be pretty clear that those with the best (most efficient) mechanics are those who throw the hardest and with the least size advantage. Thus, studying 95-100 mph pitchers who are under 6 feet and weigh less than 200 lbs is a valuable pursuit. There’s a reason guys like Wagner, Lincecum, Volquez, and other thin/short guys can throw so hard. This is not to say there are not big pitchers who also have exceptional mechanics, but in general you take the 6’4" 225lb pitcher throwing 95 and the 6’0 170lb pitcher throwing 95 and it’s fairly clear whose mechanics are “more efficient” i.e. able to transfer the most force to the ball for their size, strength, etc.

Strasburg strikes me as one of the rare “big” pitchers who throws like a small pitcher. The “Usain Bolt” of pitchers, if you will (at least at the college level).

One thing I’ve witnessed and heard is the incredable strength of the smaller guys who bring it. Randy Meyers (When I met him he was just traded to the Cubs from being one of the “Nasty Boys” in Cincy) had the most “Popeye” lookin forearms I’ve ever seen…I’m talkin mutant…no roids action back then, Lincecum and Billy Wagner impress me that they could bend nails with their core’s. So having efficient mechs complemented with being very strong in order to acheive the hi speeds, to me, is the deal.

Good points about strength. Agree 100%

With that said, I find it comical that a lot of the baseball workouts you find, and all the buzz words and talk about core training only…fail to incorporate the basic movements that develop the kinds of strength and nervous system activity required to throw the ball at high velocity.

Tons of explosive “speed strength” and “loosey goosey” whip action of the arm/body is what is needed to deliver a ball at high velocity.

Exercises like squats, dead lifts, power cleans, BB rows, bench presses are the corner stone movements a baseball player should engage in. Plyo’s and olympics lifts don’t hurt either.

Unfortunately too much political correctness and fear mongering steers a lot of people away from these types of workouts.

Just my humble opinion… :lol:

[quote]Good points about strength. Agree 100%

With that said, I find it comical that a lot of the baseball workouts you find, and all the buzz words and talk about core training only…fail to incorporate the basic movements that develop the kinds of strength and nervous system activity required to throw the ball at high velocity.

Tons of explosive “speed strength” and “loosey goosey” whip action of the arm/body is what is needed to deliver a ball at high velocity.

Exercises like squats, dead lifts, power cleans, BB rows, bench presses are the corner stone movements a baseball player should engage in. Plyo’s and olympics lifts don’t hurt either.

Unfortunately too much political correctness and fear mongering steers a lot of people away from these types of workouts.

Just my humble opinion… [/quote]

Careful bout that agreeing stuff, might stand you in bad staid in some corners :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

My belief is in holistic pitching…whole body, whole program, leave a part weak and pay…I say…ok? No play…can’t talk this way…
Yeesh sometimes… :roll:
It is why I whole heartedly and without any reservations recommend Steven Ellis’ book Tuff Cuff…not a paid advertisement btw…I can’t even squeeze a stinkin hat out of the guy :wink: