LHP IN THE 90's STILL NO OFFERS

hey dude whats up. Ya i am a sophomore in high school and i am currently throwing 80mph dude. Its not about being big at all bro. As long as your mechanics are consistent and proper then you will be able to make any team dude. And also you are tall. 5’11 is not short at all dude. Most pitchers in the majors arelike only 6’0-6’2. So ya. I am only 5’10and a half and i strike out a shit load of guys.

Tommy john surgery may be a factor as well. The college might think you are just a hazard maybe. But in the other case your fastball is very fast. So i don’t know. I would say keep doing what your doing. You will eventually get offered a scholorship.

Baseballkid111, 5’11" may not be short in the 9 to 5 fields or everyday life, but you’re kidding yourself and lying to VeLoCiTyy by saying it’s “not short at all” when compared to other baseball pitchers.

It’s basically fact that scouts look for a big frame - tall, broad, etc.

The good thing is that he is a lefty. Lefties often get a “pass” in those categories because, well, they’re lefties.

VeLoCiTyy, your teammates are not correct, in my opinion, by saying that you need to be recruited and offered by the end of your sophomore year if you ever want to play D1. If I am interpreting your post correctly, you’re entering your junior season, which means you still have your junior (and obviously senior) season to play. I’m also interpreting your post as saying you just finished your sophomore season, but missed it because of having/recovering from TJS. If that is the case, then of course you won’t be offered or recruited…college coaches didn’t get to see you at all!!!

Having TJS at such a young age is a little scary, but if you throw high 80s-low 90s from the left side, I have hard time believing you will go un-recruited much longer. That is VERY good, even for professional pitchers.

If any of my assumptions are incorrect, let me know, but regardless, make sure to keep your body in great shape to prevent any further injuries. As a sophomore/junior LHP throwing 88-91, you’ve got a bright future ahead of you. You’ve just got to stay on the field!

Good luck.

Let me make a couple of comments here.
First, there have been pitchers who were even shorter than you. There was a guy named Bobby Shantz in the American League, who was 5’6" if he was an inch, and he was one of the top pitchers in the majors—he pitched for the Philadelphia A’s and the Yankees, to name two teams, and he won a lot of games, and his size didn’t have anything to do with it. The guy could flat-out pitch. So you really should not be concerned about being under six feet.
Second, Tommy John surgery has become almost as commonplace as a tonsillectomy—there are so many pitchers who have had it, and a lot of them wind up pitching better than ever. They took all the time they needed to rehab, to get back into shape, and if some of them may have lost a little velocity they made up for it in a big way with a fine arsenal of pitches, with increased control and better command of those pitches, and lots of baseball savvy, believe me. Some of them adopted different arm angles or learned to use more than one. They did what they had to do, and they made it to the Show, and they did or are doing all right for themselves.
I’d like to tell you a story here that illustrates just how shortsighted some managers, coaches, scouts, etc. can be. It seems that one manager got wind of a pitcher in a low minor league who was supposed to be a real phenomenon, and so he sent a scout to check him out. The scout watched the kid pitch a perfect game, struck out a whole bunch of batters—only one got so much as a loud foul off him. The scout reported back to the manager about what he had seen. Back came the reply: "Sign up the guy who got the foul! We’re looking for hitters!"
TJ surgery is not the end of the road; it can be just the beginning, and those scouts, etc. who fail to realize this are, to put it bluntly, all wet. You are no more an injury risk than anyone else. If you have good sound mechanics, good stuff and can get the ball over for strikes, you have jujst as good a chance as anyone else. Stay in there and pitch! 8)

Your buddies must be top notch pitchers. In my experience, junior year is the most crucial year of a players high school years. That is when a lot of recruiting takes place, and I would say a majority of players get offers after their junior year and into their senior year.

If you’re a lefty and you really are throwing that hard you will get countless looks from colleges, and likely pro scouts. (As a side note, I’ve often been told that scouts, in fact, don’t look for broad shoulders, but rather narrow shoulders. Due to the fact that your clavicles continue to grow until you are about 23, narrow shoulders are a sign that a player will continue to grow and fill out). You still have a lot of growing to do as a junior in high school. It would not be out of the ordinary for you to put on 10 or 15 pounds before your senior year starts. Let your high school coach know you would like to pursue baseball at the next level. He will be one of your key resources.

In this day and age, you can’t rely on the colleges to find you - you have to go to them. It’s all about marketing yourself; it doesn’t matter how good you are if no one knows you’re out there! Plenty of great players (in all sports) go unsigned because they didn’t reach out to the schools themselves. Colleges don’t have unlimited budgets to scour the ends of the earth - if you play for a small school no one has ever heard of or doesn’t have a winning program, you may not be getting a lot of press. Get some professional video done, get yourself on a bunch of websites, attend showcases, start contacting the coaches of the schools you think you can play for and would like to attend (of course, make sure you are a match academically), and keep them updated of your progress, your stats, who you are playing, that you are staying out of trouble, and that you get good grades, etc. You’ve got to make it happen for yourself; don’t sit back and wait for them to come to you. You may be waiting a long time.

this is so true.

these days you cant wait for them to come to you. players recruit themselves nowadays

I had to comment on this thread…

NO, you don’t have to get seriously looked at in your sophomore year, or even sign your sophomore year. I signed my senior year and know many others that have also.

YES, size is important. Don’t let anyone else tell you otherwise

YES, throwing left handed is a huge advantage.

… and if you are lefthanded and throwing upper eighties and ACTUALLY hitting 91 you should be getting plenty of attention in the next couple years.

[quote=“Hammer”]I had to comment on this thread…

NO, you don’t have to get seriously looked at in your sophomore year, or even sign your sophomore year. I signed my senior year and know many others that have also.

YES, size is important. Don’t let anyone else tell you otherwise

YES, throwing left handed is a huge advantage.

… and if you are lefthanded and throwing upper eighties and ACTUALLY hitting 91 you should be getting plenty of attention in the next couple years.[/quote]

one of those post titles that just jump out at you huh haha

You’ll be fine but I agree you need to promote yourself. School first, then sports. Make a list of schools you’re interested in and reach out to the coaches. Also, attend some showcase tourneys. No reason that a left-hander sitting high 80’s is not getting looks.

I realize that my question may not belong in this forum, but I’m confused. I thought that DI colleges were prohibited from contacting potential athletes as sophomores. What am I missing here? I thought the rule was that they could not contact you until after June 1st of your Junior year.

Yes, for D1 college baseball, coaches may not contact any high school athlete until July 1st of the athlete’s junior year - and they can only call once per week. Official visits are not permitted until the first day of classes of the athlete’s senior year and he is only allowed one official visit per college up to a maximum of 5 official visits to D1 and D2 schools. However, the athlete can make as many calls to the coach as he wishes (at his expense) and may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

I wouldn’t be worried at all, get yourself to a couple showcases your junior year, and the rules specify that coaches can’t actually do anything more than express interest till your senior year.

And if you really are topping 90 as a lefty you don’t need to worry about anything. By your senior year I guarentee you’ll have D1 coaches after you, hell at that speed, with that arm side, youll probably end up getting drafted at some point as well.