Leg kick

yeh when your in your wind up when you do your leg kick should it be like really high in the air like dontrelle willis or should it be not as high if ianyone has photos please send me

[quote=“dtrain”]yeh when your in your wind up when you do your leg kick should it be like really high in the air like dontrelle willis or should it be not as high if ianyone has photos please send me[/quote]its all personal preference, how you feel confortable, most ppl like the high leg kick to build up more momentum

tanner lorrenz you got any movies or any photos so i can get it more

[quote=“dtrain”]tanner lorrenz you got any movies or any photos so i can get it more[/quote] thats wood, hes got a high leg kick

that is more of a low leg kick

does the toe have to be pointed down

[quote=“dtrain”]does the toe have to be pointed down[/quote]nope, personally preference again

Since you see a tremendous variation in what hard-throwers do in terms of leg kicks (from slide steps to full Nolan Ryans) I don’t think it actually matters as much as some people think.

However, a higher leg kick might have a positive psychological impact on the pitcher (it may help them feel like they can throw harder) and maybe help to intimidate the batter.

I prefer that my guys take a smaller leg kick where the GS upper leg comes horizontal. Not everyone has the balance or the flexibility to do what Nolan Ryan did or what Dontrelle Willis does.

The leg kick is very important. It is one of the pieces that lays the foundation for later aspects of the delivery. Taking into account the idea of the kinetic chain and the body acting as a whip, I don’t see how anyone could view it otherwise.

Assuming the leg kick doesn’t matter, when do we get to the aspects of the delivery that do matter?

What benefit does a pitcher get from a smaller leg kick?

Speaking theoretically here (not attacking you), if the leg kick is very important then why are some guys able to throw very hard with a smaller one and some guys are able to throw very hard without one at all (e.g. out of a slide step)?

I think that people may be making an assumption about the importance of leg kick that may not be valid. I know a lot of people assume that reverse-rotation of the shoulders is critical when it isn’t.

Faster time to the plate.

More consistent mechanics if he doesn’t have both a Wind-Up position motion and a Set position motion.

Chris, can you give some examples of pitchers who are able to throw, say, 94+ MPH from a slide step? (Please no pictures, just names.)

The reason I challenge you is, I don’t know too many flamethrowers who have a low kick, and the pitchers (that I’ve seen) who use a slide step lose at least a few MPH.

Robb Nen.

His tap-step with his GS foot after his leg lift would kill all of the momentum that he developed with his leg lift.

There are degrees of freedom in the delivery. Pitcher’s have different leg kick mechanics because they are different! The goal is to find what works best for the individual. To say the leg kick doesn’t matter is crazy. The leg kick has a huge impact in the development of momentum, sequencing the segments of the kinetic chain, loading/unloading etc.

There are methods of being quick to the plate and maintaining the quality of pitches. A lot of the time a slide step relates to a loss of velocity, a drop in pitch making and a whole lot more stress on the arm. Putting time to the plate over quality of stuff is putting the cart in front of the horse.

Again, if the leg kick doesn’t matter, when do the parts of the delivery start to become important?

Do you have any science behind your claims?

I don’t totally agree here.

The toe doesn’t HAVE to be pointed down, but if it is, there’s a better chance of you landing on your toes and ball of your foot — which usually means you’re landing softly, in control, and will be in a better position to pull your momentum forward with a slightly flexed front leg.

Comfort is important, but at the same time you want the ankle to be loose and flexible for a soft landing.

There are of course exceptions, but in general I think it’s better to try to land on the ball of your foot as opposed to your heel — landing on the heel can cause the front leg to lock stiff and hold back your momentum.

I’m sure there are people who will disagree with this idea but it’s a principle that’s worked for many successful pitchers going back about 100 years.

the leg kick i would say is your own preference, but the toe doesnt have to be pointed down, what it does need is to be relaxed, your foot will hang just being relaxed, you dont have to be pointing it down.

I’m with heelan13 on this one. There are far better things to think about than whether or not your toe is pointed in the right manner. Also, there are many examples of varying approaches to it.

yeh ive been trying to pint my toe down word but it aent working for me im just gonna do my leg kick

I wouldn’t lose sleep over pointing your toe down or landing toe first. I estimate that 80% of big leaguers land either heel first or flat footed. The teach to land on your toe is another case of voodoo baseball coaching by people who have not taken the time to look at video. I was literally amazed at how much my eyes had deceived me when I began to use slow motion video analysis.

Or does momentum allow you to get out over your front foot and land on the ball of the foot?

Robb Nen.

His tap-step with his GS foot after his leg lift would kill all of the momentum that he developed with his leg lift.[/quote]

C’mon Chris, you can do better than that. You gave me one, and it was a guy who had about four surgeries on his rotator cuff. How about some examples (plural), and preferably guys who aren’t throwing “all arm” ?

Look, Benito Santiago could hit the high 80s throwing from his knees, and Shawon Dunston could gas it up throwing from SS … which I guess is your point (that speed is possible without a high lift). But let’s do a better job of proving / disproving the theory of leg lift height in relation to speed with several examples.

For example, here is my list of some upper 90s guys:

Nolan Ryan
Billy Wagner
Roger Clemens
Dwight Gooden
Randy Johnson
Rich Gossage
Sandy Koufax
Dave Righetti
Justin Verlander
Jeremy Bonderman
Steve Carlton
Vida Blue
J.R. Richard

All of these guys got it up over 95, and all got their knee higher than their waist during their leg lift on their upper 90s fastballs.

I’m not a big fan of Tom House, but his “tall and fall” theory has some weight. Its akin to running downhill … which is faster than running on flat ground.

If the height of the starting point doesn’t matter so much, then why was the mound height reduced in 1969?

Or does momentum allow you to get out over your front foot and land on the ball of the foot?[/quote]

I think they work together … momentum + landing on ball of foot is an athletic position. In any sport, you’re stronger with your weight forward and on the balls of your feet.