Leg in pitching

how much speed can I gain from strengthening my legs a lot?

if you want a specific response ask a specific question.

How much pitching speed can bee gain from weight training my legs?(theyre very skinny so you know)

Here is an interesting anecdote: A kid I train (shot put) went from 205 to 235 pounds (6’1") in a year. He quit baseball prior to gaining the weight. His back squat went from 245 to 405. His power clean went to 255. He snatches 190. He can bench 275.

He hasn’t thrown a baseball in a year. When we had the mocap lab up, he wanted to throw for the heck of it. Keep in mind, he had just overhead pressed 7 sets of 5 reps at about 150.

Last year, he was touching 70-71. That day, while terribly fatigued, after a year of not throwing baseballs, with unrefined mechanics, he touched 80.

Think about it.

couldn’t some of this velocity be, because of natural growth.

How much did he grow(height) wise in that 1 year.

Also i wouldn’t doubt it as well. Adding nearly 150lbs to your back squat. Thats got to help your velocity

His arm must have hurt like hell after wards, i know mine would of.

1 year of natural growth definitely helped, but he hasn’t grown that much heightwise. I would attribute most of the gain to strength; probably 80%. Plus you have to factor in velocity loss simply because he hasn’t throw baseballs in a year, so that at least offsets the natural growth, IMO.

And yes his arm (specifically elbow) was inflamed the next day. Like I told him it would be. :roll: But kids are gonna be kids!

[quote=“kyleb”]Here is an interesting anecdote: A kid I train (shot put) went from 205 to 235 pounds (6’1") in a year. He quit baseball prior to gaining the weight. His back squat went from 245 to 405. His power clean went to 255. He snatches 190. He can bench 275.

He hasn’t thrown a baseball in a year. When we had the mocap lab up, he wanted to throw for the heck of it. Keep in mind, he had just overhead pressed 7 sets of 5 reps at about 150.

Last year, he was touching 70-71. That day, while terribly fatigued, after a year of not throwing baseballs, with unrefined mechanics, he touched 80.

Think about it.[/quote]

His increase in the weights of his exercises is not a reflection of increased strength/muscle, but a increase in the skill of using free weights…

[quote=“TheUnDiscovered”][quote=“kyleb”]Here is an interesting anecdote: A kid I train (shot put) went from 205 to 235 pounds (6’1") in a year. He quit baseball prior to gaining the weight. His back squat went from 245 to 405. His power clean went to 255. He snatches 190. He can bench 275.

He hasn’t thrown a baseball in a year. When we had the mocap lab up, he wanted to throw for the heck of it. Keep in mind, he had just overhead pressed 7 sets of 5 reps at about 150.

Last year, he was touching 70-71. That day, while terribly fatigued, after a year of not throwing baseballs, with unrefined mechanics, he touched 80.

Think about it.[/quote]

His increase in the weights of his exercises is not a reflection of increased strength/muscle, but a increase in the skill of using free weights…[/quote]

Yes, he become more skilled at using free weights to the tune of squatting 405 instead of 245.

If you would stop reading that garbage Body by Science nonsense (which was mostly disproven decades ago), you would know this. Have you ever thought to read OTHER material to see if it squares up with what you believe?

I already know the answer to this question, but it bears repeating so no one else listens to your nonsense.

I’ve read the material and even have had to do some of these age old exercises at my HS. I feel badly for those that must perform these stone age exercises, it is very unfortunate. My arm never felt better this HS season, never any pain… If only more people understood… :slight_smile: Best of luck to you Kyle, hopefully you will wip that figure of yours into shape sometime soon :wink:

-For those who want to quit wasting their time and want the best for their body, check out the link below :smiley:

What material have you read? Science and Practice of Strength Training? What research papers have you checked out that backs up “super slow motion” training?

Have you read Rippetoe’s materials? Pendlay’s?

No. What you’ve done is succumb to confirmation bias. You read some material that agrees with your worldview and succeeded as a novice lifter (EVERYTHING works as a novice) and assumed that it is the best for all.

You have not done honest research whatsoever. And it is important that everyone on this site understand this to be true.

Well Kyle, if anyone has a bias it would have to be you. Basically you make money from people that go to your baseball/workout facility. Come on… What reason do I have to be bias…? All I want is a workout that maximizes results and keep my body injury free. What is wrong with that?

On another note I’ve touched 90-92 this spring, and my new goal is 95…

[quote=“TheUnDiscovered”]Well Kyle, if anyone has a bias it would have to be you. Basically you make money from people that go to your baseball/workout facility. Come on… What reason do I have to be bias…? All I want is a workout that maximizes results and keep my body injury free. What is wrong with that?

On another note I’ve touched 90-92 this spring, and my new goal is 95…

8)[/quote]

UnDiscovered…you have touched 90 as of 2 days ago when i talked to you, so don’t exaggerate. At 6’3" 165lbs you are doing what many many others like you have done…throwing mid to upper 80s and touching 90 as a skinny and projectable high school righty with very solid mechanics.

As I recall, the levels of strength you gained from your superslow training were minimal, at best. You really have no place to be criticizing traditional strength training when 1) you have not tried it and 2) your “superior” method of training has not yielded any appreciable gains in strength for you. yes, I get that you are healthy and throwing hard…but if your strength training has not improved your strength, I would argue it hasn’t done much of anything for you really, or that what it has done for you is because pretty much ANY training will have SOME benefit for a novice lifter.

I think you would be surprised how much more powerful and explosive your body feels when you pack on 30-40lbs of muscle. You’re lucky you’re 6’3" as you have some good natural levers…you may get to that 92 mph mark but my guess is you’ll plateau until you start a good lifting program…

your only argument for why superslow training is good, is “I’m healthy and have touched 90.” You’re not going to find much support if that is your argument

[quote=“TheUnDiscovered”]

His increase in the weights of his exercises is not a reflection of increased strength/muscle, but a increase in the skill of using free weights…[/quote]

this is such a ludicrous claim…you are brainwashed my friend if you think he can add 150lbs to a lift and not increase strength/hypertrophy.

Undiscovered is posting anecdotal “evidence.” I see that he won’t respond to any of my actual questions and instead just goes off on a tangent about his personal experience.

The plural of anecdote is not data. Just because you managed to touch 90 doesn’t mean the Body By Science garbage is meaningful. Multiple inputs are responsible for that, and if anything, you’re fortunate that you throw that hard despite a terrible workout routine.

I own a workout facility that trains athletes using methods that make sense and don’t bastardize the word “science.” If machines worked for non-injured athletes, we’d use them. They don’t.

Well your methods obviously aren’t working for you, Kyle… lol

I feel fortunate that my personal trainer has over 30+ years in the fitness industry… And has also worked along side fitness greats such as Arthur Jones.

again, you are bringing absolutely nothing to the table in terms of intelligent discussion… there are thousands of personal trainers who have been in the industry for 30+ years…this does not mean the training methods are sound. Why don’t you explain your point of view instead of just telling us you’re right? Also kyleb’s left nut is stronger than you…maybe he doesn’t have the pitcher’s body or mechanics that you do, but he has certainly come closer to maximizing his strength than you have.

What does this even mean? In terms of athletes I’ve produced? You might pitch pro ball, but I’ve trained people who are currently pitching pro and college ball. So you tell me what is working.

from my own personal experience.

I can tell you right now that increasing your strength and size will allow you to throw much, much harder. This is from personal experience. Not from any of your body science crap.

Last year in august i was around 160lbs. And threw around 71mph, i was mainly a control pitcher. Last august my bench was 140lbs. It is now 260lbs.

My squat went from 170lbs to as of 3 days ago 400lbs for 5 reps(thx kyle for that pyramiding routine u gave me on my other post, it allowed me to get to my 400lb squat.)

My deadlift went from like 180lbs to as of today, 480lbs for 5 reps.

All my lifts went up drastically.

As of today i throw consistently 85mph and sometimes hit around 88mph.

Will that being said i just turned 18 years old and am getting scouted as well, due to my increase in size.

I can say right now strength training will only benefit you.

Why not try strength training for 3 months or so. I can gurantee with that extra size you would maybe be throwing 95mph consistently and maybe harder. You are only hurting yourself due to your stupidity.

LOL personal trainers. I went to a personal trainer for a year. Biggest mistake of my life.

He had use to doing machines the whole workout and we would only do 1 set each time. Biggest f ing joke ever.

We never squatted, deadlifted, or benched at all. WE never did any rows at all. The only compound lift we did was chin ups and those were on a limited basis hahaha

I think personal trainers are a joke, get a strength coach buddy.